Volunteers in Medicine America

Together We Heal

Hilton Head Island, SC   |  https://volunteersinmedicine.org/

Mission

To build and support a national network of free health clinics that utilize volunteer health professionals in caring for low-income, uninsured and underserved populations.

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Mr. Mark R. Cruise

Main address

P.O. Box 21177

Hilton Head Island, SC 29925 USA

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EIN

31-1467440

NTEE code info

Management & Technical Assistance (E02)

Management & Technical Assistance (Y02)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

30 million people in the U.S. lack health insurance and millions more face barriers to care such as gaps in coverage, high costs, and provider shortages. Communities are stronger when everyone - regardless of religion, country of origin or financial status - has the opportunity to be healthy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

New Clinic Development

Volunteers in Medicine America is the only national nonprofit dedicated to the development of free health care clinics for the uninsured. Volunteers in Medicine (VIM) clinics depend on local leadership, community organization and sound planning for sustainability. Experienced Volunteers in Medicine America staff provide assistance and resource materials through each step of the clinic development process. A site visit is required to assess leadership potential, troubleshoot issues, and further guide the planning process. Each local steering committee is required to complete a feasibility study to assess the needs and resources of the community to determine the viability of a VIM clinic. VIM clinics emphasize the “Circle of Caring” treating each person who enters the clinic with dignity and respect. Within this culture, volunteer medical professionals are able to practice “pure medicine” without the headaches associated with the business of medicine, and patients are treated as “friends and neighbors” not as diseases, cases, or numbers.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Volunteers in Medicine America supports a national network of health care clinics based on the VIM model and developed under the guidance of the Volunteers in Medicine America staff. Network benefits include networking opportunities, access to a discounted purchasing programs, educational programs and clinic resources.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Volunteers in Medicine America aims to achieve health care access for all with a circle of caring in every community. We strive to harness the collective will of communities to come together and compassionately serve their neighbors in need.

Volunteers in Medicine America is a national nonprofit dedicated to building a network of free primary health care clinics for the uninsured and underserved.

Key strategies include guiding local organizing committees through a proven model to ensure a sustainable, community-owned free clinic; promoting volunteerism and creating fulfilling opportunities for retired professionals; and, supporting the long-term success of our clinic network by providing relevant data, continuing education programs, a discount group purchasing program, networking and funding opportunities.

Volunteers in Medicine is a movement that began 25 years ago and has spread from one free health care clinic in Hilton Head, South Carolina to 92 free clinics in 30 states and 10 more in development across the country. The Volunteers in Medicine model has endured many changes in the health care landscape. Built on a solid foundation with commitment from the local community, the model has succeeded in all types of geographic locations.

This scalable approach to the nation’s medically underserved relies on support from corporations, foundations and philanthropists that share our vision. Volunteers in Medicine America values collaboration and partners with many organizations to fulfill its mission including the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Americares, Dispensary of Hope, Direct Relief and the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics.

According to the 2015 National Survey of Free and Charitable Clinics, Volunteers in Medicine clinics have a greater focus upon quality, are open more hours, are better resourced and have a substantially higher number of volunteers than other clinics in the sector.

In 2019 our network of 92 clinic affiliates in 30 states provided care to 93,000 patients thanks to the dedicated efforts of almost 5,000 healthcare professionals and an additional 4,700 community volunteers. 57% of patients are minorities, 59% are female, and 91% are between the ages of 19-64. Among the services provided were 315,482 medical visits, 34,189 dental visits, and 15,314 behavioral health visits. 4 new clinics were added to our network in 2019.

Volunteers in Medicine America will continue to evolve and innovate with the changing healthcare landscape. To continuing strengthening our network of free clinics and the care they provide, we aim to build Volunteers in Medicine America into a nationally recognized brand that draws supporters to the mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Volunteers in Medicine America
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Volunteers in Medicine America

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Ned Allen

Scott Hauge

CAL Insurance and Associates, Inc.

John McGinty, FACHE

Peregrine Consulting

Todd Sagin, JD, MD

Sagin Healthcare Consulting

Steve McConnell

Vanguard Cleaning Systems, Inc.

Edward R. (Ned) Allen

Intercoastal Communities (Retired)

John Richardson

John Richardson & Company, Inc.

Barbara Walker, PhD

Clinical health psychologist

Elizabeth Howell

Fundraising consultant

Jim Collett

Retired telecommunications executive

Amy Garcia, DNP, MSN, RN, CENP

University of Kansas School of Nursing

Louis Weinstein, MD

OB/GYN physician

Marucci Guzman, MPA

Latino Leadership/Clinica Mi Salud

Kat Mastrangelo, MPA

Volunteers in Medicine of the Cascades

Barbara Blackmond, JD

Retired health attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/20/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.