CENTER FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND EDUCATION

Fighting poverty and restoring dignity through messages of faith, freedom, and personal responsibility.

aka CURE   |   Washington, DC   |  https://curepolicy.org

Mission

Fighting poverty and restoring dignity through messages of faith, freedom, and personal responsibility.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Center for Urban Renewal and Education is a policy and research center that seeks free-market solutions to provide education, employment, healthcare, and the opportunity for Black families to grow and their communities to flourish. CURE is at the forefront of revitalizing America. We are devoted to the work of policy, advocacy, & action on behalf of our nation's distressed zip codes. In 2020 we accomplished the following in key areas of focus: 1. We connected churches with development programs to help them transform their fallow property into affordable housing that benefits the local community. 2. We developed the Church Youth Training Program to educate tomorrow's youth and planned a Youth Policy Summit for 2022. 3. We started developing our Policy Workshop placing high priority on repairing the damage done to US Healthcare by regulatory pressures. 4. We defended Conservative Economic Policies on National Television and launched our own weekly show: CURE America with Star Parker

Ruling year info

1997

President & Founder

Ms. Star Parker

Main address

1317 F St NW FL 8

Washington, DC 20004 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education

EIN

31-1467594

NTEE code info

Freedom of Religion Issues (R65)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Right to Life (R62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CURE seeks to reach urban communities with our message of responsible government, free markets, and traditional values.

Today, there are more people are taking benefits from the government than there are contributing to the economy. In addition to this, the government is furthering its debt with nearly a trillion dollars of annual anti-poverty spending that is doing little to assuage the obvious systemic issues at hand. And the story specifically within the urban community makes these problems at the national level seem even more dire.

➢ 75% of black children are in fatherless homes, a number that has tripled since 1970.
➢ More than 684,000 black babies are aborted annually.
➢ 43% of the prison population is black.

We seek to reverse the course of wasterful, ineffective government spending on welfare programs that further impoverish people of color.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CURE Clergy Center

Through our Clergy Center, CURE is educating, equipping, and engaging Clergy that serve in distressed zip codes across the nation with resources that prove the answer to poverty is freedom: not a welfare state.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Through our Media Center, CURE is addressing issues of culture, poverty, and race relation from a Judeo-Christian conservative perspective in mainstream, cable, and social media.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
People of African descent

Through our Policy Center, CURE is helping change anti-poverty laws to help change the lives of the poor by consulting directly with the White House, elected officials, and allied organizations.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, Christians, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CURE Clergy Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CURE is the only DC-based organization that exclusively focuses on public policy that promotes market-based solutions to fight poverty in African American and urban communities. We accomplish that mission through our policy center, our 875-member Clergy Network, and our vast media outreach. These efforts work in tandem to dismantle government dependency and advance economic growth through faith, family, and local governance. For more than twenty years, CURE has led the fight to transition America's poor out of the bondage of our welfare state.

At CURE we believe we can change laws to change lives, continue to build an alternative black media outlet, and reach minority clergy members. That's why our work is divided into three sectors— Policy, Media, and Grassroots Organizing— that specifically target these needs to bring about the change urban communities need.

Policy: CURE provides testimony before Congress and educates policy makers with conservative answers to the areas of urban poverty, federal entitlements, and market-based solutions. We issue policy reports and white papers, and work with academics specializing in the concerns of modern urban communities. Our goal in these activities is to create, influence, and advocate for policy solutions that have a direct positive impact on communities rife with social and economic struggle.

Media: CURE has created new avenues to promote principles we believe can transform urban communities, including:

➢ CURE president Star Parker's nationally syndicated weekly column which reached a readership of 8 million people in 2017.

➢ BlackCommunityNews.com, that now has over two million pageviews and its own engaged online community.

➢ In addition to our own media, CURE staff members also frequently appear in major print, web, radio, and television networks advocating for our ideas and conservative values.

Grassroots Organizing: CURE knows from personal experience and the testimony of friends and neighbors that one of the biggest ways the African American community can be impacted is through the influence of committed clergy and church communities. With this evidence in mind, CURE founded The National CURE Clergy Network, a nationwide network of clergy who work with CURE to expand the impact of our work in urban communities.

We work to educate and inform our 875-member clergy network on issues that have an impact in their communities, and these clergy in turn engage their congregations in conversations about government, poverty solutions, and the family values that can strengthen their families and urban living. The CURE Clergy Network provides a practical way for pastors to engage their congregations, and for CURE to help identify the concerns of black communities across the country.

CURE hosts regular roundtables, strategy sessions, and an annual, pastor-focused National Policy Summit to provide them with training in ways to activate church communities around the most pressing issues in their community. Our educated, influential, and strongly networked clergy collaborate with us in these ways to make a profound difference in their churches and the culture at large.

CURE founder and president has a syndicated column in national news outlets that reaches over 8 million readers on an annual basis.

CURE's website, BlackCommunityNews.com, had 693,728 page views, and boasts 181,156 unique users.

CURE's Annual National Policy Summit is held in Washington DC and hosts over 100 minority pastors for three days and features nationally recognized experts in their respective fields.

In 2017,

1. CURE's team visited 25 state capitals to lobby, meet with and educate lawmakers and policy makers.

2. CURE's team visited, spoke to and engaged with students on eight college campuses.

3. CURE's team visited, spoke to and engaged with pregnancy centers in eight states.

4. CURE's team consulted with the White House on Welfare Reform, Israel, Sanctity of Human Life and Religious Freedom.

5. CURE's team testified before Congress; lobbied Congress; and educated multiple Congressional leaders on minority related concerns.

6. CURE's Media Center has 66,440 friends on Facebook, 158,049 YouTube views, 26,200 Twitter followers, and the website, BlackCommunityNews.com has over 181,156 unique users.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CURE serves a National Clergy Network and their congregations, supporting our mission to fight poverty and restore dignity through the messages of faith, freedom, and personal responsibility. CURE National Clergy Network is a nationwide coalition of pastors and faith leaders working with CURE and committed to the common pursuit of national renewal and transformation through the intersection of Christian faith and public policy. Our Clergy Network serves local communities and our pastors proclaim the urban Christian voice in the country and its capital. Our pastors seek to reverse the deleterious effects of secular influence in American society, inspired by the preaching of the Gospel to influence public policy and support ethical leadership.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CENTER FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND EDUCATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CENTER FOR URBAN RENEWAL AND EDUCATION

Board of directors
as of 9/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Marc Little

Attorney

Term: 2019 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mr. TW Shannon

CEO & Director

Term: 2019 - 2020

Dr. William Allen

Professor

James Golden

Media Consultant

Angela Minter

Sisters for Life

John Strauss

Businessman

John Bedrosian

Philantrophist

Rosie Grier

Minister and Former NFL Player

Kenneth Blackwell

Former Ohio Secretary of State

T. Shannon

Attorney, Public Policy Consultant

Star Parker

Founder of CURE

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data