HISPANIC MINISTRY CENTER INC

New Leadership for a New World

aka Urban Youth Workers Institute   |   Santa Ana, CA   |  www.uywi.org

Mission

MISSION: We exist to resource and develop urban leaders so that urban youth have the role models they need to live transformed lives by the Gospel of Jesus Christ. VISION: UYWI fuels a movement of urban leaders who lead generations of youth to restore and rebuild broken communities globally.

Ruling year info

1997

Chief Executive Officer

Tommy Nixon

Main address

2321 E. 4th St. Ste C607

Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1524740

NTEE code info

Christian (X20)

Religious Leadership, Youth Development (O55)

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (S19)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We know 1.2 Million youth are leaving the church every year. At this rate it is estimated that 42 million young people could leave the church by 2050. We are facing an incredible urgency to reach the next generation! UYWI provides networks, resources, certification, and coaching so that urban youth have the role models they need to live transformed lives by the Gospel of Jesus Christ. A study by the Pinetops Foundation in 2018 states, “There is incredible urgency to the moment—every year over one million young people will walk away from the Christian faith. Statistically, most people decide on their faith by 35—and the oldest millennial is now 38; the oldest Gen Z is 18.” This study states the following numbers: 42 MILLION - Based on the current rates of retention and evangelism, it's estimated that 42 million young people could leave the church by 2050. 20 MILLION - If, however, we can revert to Gen X rates of retention and evangelism, that number can be reduced to only 20 million.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Certification Program

UYWI Certification Program in Urban Youth Ministry Leadership, formerly known as 90 Degrees, is one of UYWI's most successful programs. The program offers both leadership development and personal development designed to equip high-capacity urban leaders with key elements of effective leadership in ministry. This certification was created to fill a void in the Urban Ministry Training landscape to provide solid, practical, leadership and ministry training by experts in ministry who have lived the urban ministry experience.

As of 2020, UYWI has led 16 cohorts and graduated 265 leaders. The UYWI Certification Program helps leaders build competencies and acquire practical training from experts in the field of Urban Ministry. The key areas and topics covered in the program are healthy leadership, self-awareness, spiritual rhythms, strategic planning, ministry organization, discipleship, community engagement, and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults

ManHood Camp Initiative gathers young men 13 -18 years old, and encourages them in God-honoring masculinity, by helping them identify, and begin to overcome father wounds that may have developed in their life-time, and to give practical tools that every young man needs to thrive and one day be a faithful, and committed man, husband and father.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Adolescents

We created the UYWI Network to bring you together with equally passionate people ready to solve the unique challenges of urban ministry.

A few things you’ll see quickly that make the UYWI Network different:

1. We have some great features for creating exclusive content, deeper conversations, richer polls, and online or in-real-life events. Plus, by building this community off of social media, we can have a more efficient and valuable experience for leaders.

2. There are more ways for leaders to meet people who are near them, who fall into the same categories, or who care about the same topics. We can’t get this in free groups or on a website elsewhere.

3We bring together content and community. This means we are able to bring leaders new, fresh ideas and resources that they can take into their unique ministry context.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents

Our Leadership Coaching program is the pinnacle of our process for urban leaders to help them become healthy high-capacity, high-impact leaders. We define those qualities in leaders as:

1. Healthy – Holistically balanced moving towards healthy indicators in all areas
2. High Capacity – The ability to lead and manage several key areas of
organizational directives
3. High Impact – Measured and defined success of growth
4. Our goal is to help leaders implement best practices for operative, personal, and
strategic growth so they may have a greater impact in the lives of urban youth.

Process:
Our process begins with a leader that has come through the larger process and programs of CONNECT, LEARN, and GROW. In this way, leaders are vetted before being invited or applying for this program. Once an application is made there is an overall assessment of the organization and/or program that the leader is leading. That comprehensive assessment will help us understand the context and areas that need to be addressed to grow capacity and impact. There are four types of leaders we work with — mission-driven catalysts, ministry leaders, non-profit leaders, and non-profit builders. The areas of focus will be in operations, personal, and strategy or OPS. Under operations, we can provide coaching in management, accounting, human resources, and legal issues. Under personal, we can provide coaching in personal development, life balance, leader profile, holistic formation and personal management. Under strategic, we can provide coaching in shaping mission, vision, and values, collaborations, communications, marketing, and fundraising.

Once the assessment is completed an OPS manual will be constructed for the individual leader. They will be assigned a coach and that coach will walk them through the process of implementation in the areas that have been identified with them. Each manual would have templates for each area of the OPS development. The method of validation for each area would be completed templates, implementation, and assessment of impact for those areas.

The key is that we are helping them create and implement better systems and practices that will have a greater impact in their work. That impact is to be determined and measured with a baseline, target, and method of validation from the beginning of the assessment to the end of the coaching program.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Top Rated List 2019

Great Nonprofits

Top Rated List 2020

Great Nonprofits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

DKIT RESOURCE - number of youth discipled through DKIT

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: 75,000 Youth discipled through DKIT. BASELINE: 53753 Youth discipled through DKIT

CREATION OF CORE LEADERSHIP TRAINING - number of trainings executed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the pandemic, we shifted to Zoom training calls.

DIGITAL DISCIPLESHIP (NEW RESOURCE) - number of youth in discipleship through our DKIT

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: 52,939 - 3000 more youth using this resource as part of our Discipleship series. BASELINE: 49,939 - total number of youth in discipleship through our DKIT resource since 2015

3 REGIONAL TRAINING EVENTS (Results reported below reflect youth worker attendance)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: Youth Workers - 650 | Youth - 1,300 BASELINE: Youth Workers - 475 | Youth - 1,146 Due to Covid-19, we shifted to virtual events, thereby expanding our reach significantly

GOALS AND METRICS FOR OVERALL TRAINING CENTER

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: 9,501 leaders in process past CONNECT BASELINE: 8,651 leaders in process past CONNECT

CERTIFICATION CENTER (Results Reported below reflect completion of revised training)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: Revised training that can be used to train the trainer for expansion. BASELINE: Current Certification Program

COACHING SESSION

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Young adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

TARGET: 10 Leaders of organizations that have measurable growth in 2 major areas of capacity building. BASELINE: 5 Leaders

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adults, Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Beginning in 2020, we have shifted how we will move forward with National Conference. Due to the Conference attendees being accounted for in 2019 and earlier, there was a decrease in overall attendees

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Christians, Social and economic status, Ethnic and racial groups, Young adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2018 we included an email list that is no longer active. Therefore, as of 2020, we now only count our leader Newsletter email list.

Number of online groups served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

532 Urban Youth Workers registered to learn more about the online Discipleship Toolkit. From those leaders 463 Discipleship Groups were started with their youth.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Due to events being cancelled throughout the pandemic, our volunteer hours has decreased.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Mission – We exist to resource and develop urban leaders so that urban youth have the role models they need to live transformed lives by the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

OUR PROGRAMS

Training and Resources:
The UYWI Training Center is envisioned to be the destination where urban youth workers can find and receive the finest, practical, and most relevant training for effective urban youth ministry. In the Training Center, youth workers can access tools, resources, teaching, and certification courses to help train them for more effective, impactful work in urban youth ministry. The main delivery method for the training is through the digital medium.

Certification Program:
Our certification program offers leadership training, along with personal development tools. We gather a cohort of leaders together for intensive training once a month for 13 months (including graduation day). The Certification Program focuses on equipping leaders with the 12 elements of effective youth ministry with a specific focus on Personal Leadership (Developing Me), Ministry (Developing My Ministry), and Community (Developing My Community).

NXT LVL Leadership Coaching:
Our leadership coaching is a program for high-capacity urban leaders who are ready for a more targeted and intensive coaching experience for themselves and the organizations they serve. Through an assessment and customization process, we provide targeted, intensive coaching for you and your organization. Our focus is on maximizing your leadership potential by implementing best practices for operative, personal, and strategic impact.

Networks:
In partnership with DVULI, we have launched 10 Fuel Networks throughout the country. Our regional leaders are partnered with our Network Coordinator to establish a connection with youth leaders in their cities. UYWI is providing a model and framework for establishing Fuel Networks, the framework will help Regional leaders establish a specific mission, determined by each community, supported by 3 major objectives: Gather & Connect, Carry & Care, Create & Collaborate. We are committed to supporting each network by providing resources, training, and development.

Our 2025 goal is to train and develop 15,000 urban leaders that will be actively pursuing and engaging 1,000,000 urban youth with the Gospel.

“Historically, the church has often grown by the mission effort of the youth, making them both the largest missions opportunity and the largest missions resource. The majority of the disaffiliated did not go through a crisis of faith or intellectually reject church teachings. They left because they just weren’t interested in the Christian life they saw."

We believe that it is through the efforts of urban youth workers — who lead and disciple urban youth — that the tide of disinterest in following Christ will change. It is by their example and relational engagement that gives them a true picture of the Christian life. These urban leaders are and will be the experts for the future iteration of the Church.

But who will resource, train, and develop those leaders to engage youth to see the church thrive again?

“There is a dramatic need to invest specifically in planting in emerging urban cities reaching those who have left the church; Gen Z (which follows the Millennials) is the largest generation in American history and will likely increase urban density over the next two decades. The church will need to find new models for lowering the cost of planting while increasing the number of leaders who reflect the increasing diversity of urban populations, all without sacrificing historic orthodoxy.”

There is no one better positioned to address this great opportunity than Urban Youth Workers Institute.

We create healthy, high-capacity, high-impact, urban leaders who are reaching 50% more youth with the Gospel. In 2015 our surveys showed that our leaders work with an average of 25 youth. In 2020 our leaders reported an average of 40 youth, which is a 60% increase!

In the last 5 years, we have 8,651 urban leaders engaged in our process. With a goal of 15,000 leaders, we need to reach 6,349 more leaders to engage in our process. For this to happen, we would need to have an audience reach of 317,450. There is a 2% conversion rate from those connecting with us digitally, i.e., social media, to the act of signing up on our email list, which is the gateway to using all of our resources and deeper engagement through our process.

Through an internal audit of our leaders, we discovered that the average number of students each one of our leaders works with is 25. If we can increase that number to 67 students per leader, then we would be able to reach our goal of 1,000,000 students through 15,000 leaders.

Partnership catalyst toward this goal:

Through three strategic partnerships, we also have an international, national, and regional strategy to reach more urban leaders.

Compassion International – Compassion currently works with 2 million sponsored kids. We are working toward a partnership to collaborate and create resources for all their leaders in urban areas. Currently, we are piloting a partnership with Compassion’s work in the Dominican Republic. They are using our Spanish Discipleship Toolkit that reaches over 22,000 youth. If it is received well, then expansion into the rest of Compassion’s Latin American operations is possible.

Young Life – Young Life Multi-Ethnic has over 800 staff members who work with over 400,000 urban youth. The goal of our partnership is to provide all of Young Life Multi-Ethnic’s staff with relevant resources, training, and tools to help them grow in their capacity and impact the lives of urban youth.

DeVos Urban Leadership Initiative - DVULI has an incredible network of urban youth workers in 34 major cities in the United States. We are partnering together on a regional strategy that will support their current networks of urban leaders while growing in the number of next-generation urban leaders that are engaged in our process.

CONSTANT CONTENT CREATION AND AUDIENCE GROWTH
With the advent of our Creative team, we have doubled our projected outcome with a 10.12% increase in engagement. Most importantly we are excited to see many of our current audiences engage in our leadership process.

DKIT RESOURCE
The UYWI Discipleship Toolkit: The UYWI Discipleship Toolkit is a digital resource of videos for youth workers to lead their youth on a discipleship journey through biblically-based spiritual conversations. Currently, our Discipleship Toolkit has reached over 75,000 youth through their leaders in all 50 states and 30 different countries.

DIGITAL DISCIPLESHIP (NEW RESOURCE)
Digital Discipleship: In partnership with Love Thy Nerd and Satellite Gaming, UYWI is seeking created video resources and training to help leaders and churches know how to reach and disciple youth digitally. Engagement #’s

REGIONAL TRAINING EVENTS
- MANHOOD CAMP: Thanks to leaders coming together for this conference in the midst of a pandemic, Manhood Camp was available as a digital conference for youth across the country. We had 69 leaders and 116 youth in attendance.

- ZOOM CALLS: We provided 23 Zoom calls in 2020 and continued to host Zoom calls again in 2021. They focused on the series, Implementation of Best Practices and Conversations About the Future. Our goal is to share the best practices for social engagement with youth during this time of physical distancing and igniting a conversation about how today’s reality shapes the future of the Church and the movement of urban leaders.

CERTIFICATION CENTER
The Certification Program Los Angeles and New York: In 2020, we had 30 graduates from 2 cohorts in New York and Los Angeles. In 2021 we launched 2 new cohorts in LA and NY, while also adding a new cohort in Houston, TX.

FUEL NETWORKS
We continued to invest in our 10 networks in the following cities: Los Angeles, Long Beach, Phoenix, Houston, Milwaukee, Columbus, Cleveland, Queens, DC, New Jersey.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We train and develop urban leaders so that urban youth have the role models they need to live transformed lives by the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have been intentional to increase female representation in our trainers as that has been an expressed need and desire of our continutents.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    As we seek feedback and make changes to our organization, programs, resources, and networks based on the expressed needs of our constituents, trust and mutual respect continues to increase.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

HISPANIC MINISTRY CENTER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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HISPANIC MINISTRY CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Steve Carter

Tommy Nixon

Urban Youth Workers Institute

Hector Gonzalez

Physician

Dennis Neal

Real Estate and SRG

Steve Carter

Preacher & Author

Anthony Flynn

CEO/Founder, Gifted Foundation

Chantel Runnels

Co-Owner Raincross High Performance

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/02/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.