PLATINUM2024

Cooperative for Education

Helping Guatemalan schoolchildren break the cycle of poverty through education.

aka CoEd   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.cooperativeforeducation.org

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Mission

To help Guatemalan schoolchildren break the cycle of poverty through education.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for taking the time to learn about Cooperative for Education and our work to help Guatemalan schoolchildren break the cycle of poverty thorough education. We look forward to hearing from you soon and embarking on a journey together to transform lives for thousands of Guatemalan youth, empowering them with opportunities to achieve better lives in their home country.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Mr. Joe Berninger

Main address

2300 Montana Avenue Suite 401

Cincinnati, OH 45211 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1545464

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security N.E.C. (Q99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Guatemala's Western Highlands exhibit one of the most extreme combinations of systemic poverty, illiteracy, and inequality in the hemisphere. The indigenous people who inhabit these regions suffer from poverty, malnutrition (rates of which rank among the worst in the world), poor health outcomes, high rates of illiteracy, and low levels of educational attainment. Together, these factors virtually guarantee that the next generation will be no better off than the last. More than 1 in 3 indigenous adults cannot read or write and 4 out of 5 live in poverty. In Guatemala, girls are not traditionally supported in their desire to go to school. Often, when parents have to decide which child to educate on their meager earnings, they prioritize the boys, and the girls get left behind. In some parts of Guatemala (where we work), there is a boy and a half in school for every girl.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Textbooks

Roughly 90% of middle schools in rural Guatemala don't have access to textbooks. Without them, students waste most of their learning time copying the teacher's notes from the blackboard. They often fail to develop proper study skills, lose motivation, and then drop out.

CoEd's Textbook Program provides vital books in the core areas of math, science, social studies, and Spanish to middle schools. We also train teachers to use them effectively in the classroom in order to improve the quality of teaching and learning.

https://www.coeduc.org/textbooks

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
People of Latin American descent
Families

While almost 60% of entry-level jobs in Guatemala require computer skills, children in rural communities lack access to quality computer instruction.

The Computer Centers Program gives indigenous youth the opportunity to use technology to problem-solve while developing the computer skills needed to secure better jobs after graduation. Students learn from an internationally-recognized curriculum using a project-based methodology that encourages critical thinking and working cooperatively.

https://www.coeduc.org/computers

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Poorly-trained teachers often use ineffective techniques to teach reading, emphasizing memorization instead of comprehension and critical thinking. Kids fail to learn to read and become bored, resulting in high dropout rates: 80% of rural indigenous children who begin primary school will not complete it.

The Spark Reading Program delivers high-quality children’s books and training in effective reading instruction to primary-school teachers, transforming rural Guatemalan schoolchildren into enthusiastic, competent, and lifelong readers.

https://www.coeduc.org/spark

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

In Guatemala, it takes a high-school degree to support a family above the poverty line, but 90% of students living in poverty never graduate from high school. Poor educational quality and extreme familial poverty lead the majority of students to drop out before the sixth grade.

CoEd’s Rise Program removes economic barriers to education and involves students in leadership, professional, and life skills training, as well as community service. Rise students become leaders who will help guide their communities to a better life, beyond poverty.

https://www.coeduc.org/rise

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

We live in a global world. What happens in other countries affects us at home. As such, we must continue to increase awareness, build relationships, and strengthen bonds with our neighbors, including those who lives on the margins of society.

The Bridges Program increases understanding and knowledge of global challenges and connects people in the U.S. and beyond with friends in Guatemala.

Bridges has five program areas, including:
Guatemala Service Learning Trips
Educational Presentations
School to School Partnerships
Educational Resources
Global Partnerships

https://www.coeduc.org/bridges

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Community Partnership Prize 2009

Research Triangle Institute

Rural Productivity Prize 2003

World Bank

Gutierrez Prize 2005

Guatemala’s highest award for service to humanity.

Literacy Prize 2010

Better World Books

Official certification for our textbook, computer, and literacy programs 2012

Guatemalan Ministry of Education

Literacy Award - Best Practices Honoree 2020

Library of Congress

Cultural Experience of the Year 2020

Travel & Hospitality Awards

Top-Rated Award 2017

GreatNonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

Obama Foundation's Girls Opportunity Alliance 2018

Rotary International Collaborating Organization 1997

Youth 4 Change Network 2020

Evidence for Gender Education and Resource Network (EGER) 2023

95% of computer graduates have gone on to find employment or further their education.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Computer Centers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Purpose: To provide Guatemalan school children with badly-needed technical training that positions them with necessary skills for future employment or further education.

53 Percent less time teachers spend dictating/writing on the chalkboard than they did before receiving textbooks

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Textbooks

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Purpose: Contribute to improving the quality of education for middle school students in rural areas, through the provision of Spanish, social studies, math, and science textbooks.

Eighty percent of scholarship students who enter our diversificado Rise Program graduate from diversificado.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Rise Youth Development Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

To ensure that middle and high school students can overcome the socio-economic barriers to their education through the Rise Program. The program has a strong focus on low-income indigenous women.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Cooperative for Education's mission is to help indigenous Guatemalan schoolchildren break the cycle of poverty through education.

We believe that all humans are born with abundant potential—we are destined to become creators, healers, innovators, builders, educators. We yearn to leave the world better than we found it.

But a child born into the generational cycle of poverty is too often stripped of this destiny. We believe that every child, no matter where they were born or what their circumstance, deserves the opportunity to determine their own story.

That’s where education comes in. Education is about justice. Where poverty robs us of opportunities, education gives them back. Education levels the playing field. Education opens doors.

We have a vision of a Guatemala transformed through education: a future in which every Guatemalan child learns to read and graduates high school with the skills they need to thrive. Is this a tall order? Yes. But is it possible? Absolutely. Because we know that when we empower young people with the opportunities to rise out of poverty, not only will they determine their own stories, they will shape the destiny of their country.

CoEd offers sustainable programs that work together within Guatemala's schools to help children break the cycle of poverty.
The Rise Youth Development Program removes economic barriers to education and involves young people in community service and leadership development.
Our Spark Reading Program delivers children's books and training in effective reading instruction to primary-school teachers, most of whom have little more than a high school education.
CoEd's Textbook Program provides much-needed textbooks to impoverished middle schools (grades 7-9), improving the quality of teaching and learning.
Finally, CoEd Computer Centers deliver computer equipment and high-quality technical training to middle school students, providing marketable skills.

CoEd has grown to serve schools in 12 of Guatemala's 22 departments. We have formed lasting relationships with several partners, including Guatemala's Ministry of Education, principals, teachers, parents, businesses, universities, and other nonprofits. Our work has been recognized by Rotary International, Microsoft, the United Nations, the Center for Sustainable Development, and the Obama Foundation's Girls Opportunity Alliance; and has won awards from the World Bank, the Juan Bautista Gutierrez Foundation, Better World Books, the Research Triangle Institute, and the Library of Congress.

One of CoEd's strengths is its committed and experienced staff, both in the U.S. and Guatemala. Our team is comprised of seasoned educators and development professionals, several coming from the very communities we serve. The Guatemala staff is more than twice the size of the U.S. team.

CoEd has made great strides in addressing the root causes of poverty in Guatemala, rather than merely treating its symptoms. Thanks to the sustainable nature of our programs, we have reached a cumulative total of 278,000 Guatemalan students since 1996 through the Textbook Program, Computer Centers Program, Spark Reading Program, and Rise Youth Development Program. When we began this work over 25 years ago, 2 out of 3 indigenous Guatemalans could not read or write. Today, it’s down to 1 in 3. But out of a country of almost 18 million, there is still a long way to go.

Studies show that Guatemalans need to complete 12 years of education in order to support a family above the poverty line. However, most rural Guatemalan students do not graduate from high school, leaving the vast majority of youth facing a difficult choice: a life of desperate poverty, or a dangerous journey north in hope of finding work in the U.S. We need to reach these children and create opportunities for young Guatemalans in their home country. That's why we're expanding our Rise Program and also continuing to grow our other programs at a steady rate.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, To report back to funders on the changes made possible by our programs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We have standard processes in place to collect targeted feedback for each of our four main programs.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Once students graduate from our programs it is difficult to reach them for long-term feedback.

Financials

Cooperative for Education
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cooperative for Education

Board of directors
as of 06/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brian Todd

Clark, Schaefer, Hackett & Co.

Term: 2023 - 2026

Paul Porcino

TransformaTech

Aurora Lambert

Jewish Hospital

Brian Todd

Clark Schaefer Hackett

Eric Landen

Frost Brown Todd, LLC

Rolando Archila

Atalanta Consulting

Michelle Hanavan

Change Management Consultant

Ken Petren

University of Cincinnati

Laura Trujillo

USA Today

Patrick Farfsing

Pilot Chemical Company

Joe Berninger

Cooperative for Education (ex-officio board member)

Olivia Citak

Curiosity Advertising

Rick Corcoran

Slate Capital Group

John Berninger

Deloitte

Romina Sapinoso

Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati

Mary Geren Lutz

Community Volunteer

Molly Tyger

Shine Commerce & Brakecrafters

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/11/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.