Interfaith Hospitality Network of Warren County

aka IHNWC   |   Lebanon, OH   |  www.ihnwc.org

Mission

To assist Warren County homeless families achieve sustainable independence through a community-based response.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Linda Rabolt

Main address

203 E Warren St

Lebanon, OH 45036 USA

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EIN

31-1578564

NTEE code info

(Temporary Shelter For the Homeless) (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The strain homelessness places on a family cannot be underestimated. It is critical for parents, children, and siblings to continue living and interacting like a family. Preserving family unity and providing opportunity for growth are key elements the shelter program. Nutritional meals, shelter, and transportation are requisite components for success for all families. Guiding shelter families towards true success requires numerous additional considerations. In March 2020 in response to COVID-19 our shelter program changed from a host church rotational model to housing homeless families in local motels. The host churches remain active in the program by providing all meals for each family in the network.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Shelter Program

Provide temporary shelter, food, hospitality, and support to homeless families. Our staff works with each family to gain employment to regain sustainable housing.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau 2021

Affiliations & memberships

Charity Navigator, Gold Status 2020

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Mission Statement: "To assist Warren County homeless families achieve sustainable independence through a community-based response.”

Our Vision: "To have a county where every family has a home, a livelihood and a future full of promise."

Interfaith Hospitality Network opened its doors in Warren County as a community response to family homelessness on October 1, 1998. This endeavor began with ambitious intentions: find sustainable housing solutions for families while preserving and nourishing family bonds – the bonds that are essential to a household. Families and their homes are both uniquely greater than the sum of their parts. In the IHNWC program, it is of paramount importance to preserve the intangible components of the household, and success is truly a community effort. IHNWC works with the community to ensure each family receives the comforts and resources that are commonly sacrificed during the crisis of homelessness. Through 20 years of collaboration between network congregations, the community, and IHNWC the goal was transformed into reality for 695 families

IHNWC has revised our strategic vision to move forward with a permanent facility, in parallel to our church rotational network, the goal being to open in 2022. The new facility will include expanded temporary housing, food service, and hospitality facilities for our families as well as on-site staff offices. The new facility will better enable families to stage for daily work, education, and engagement of our staff and will better serve families with handicapped members versus moving from church-to-church weekly. This public facility will also enable IHNWC to engage more of corporate/industrial Warren County to support the families with meals, hospitality, and overnight hosts via their community outreach programs, beyond the over 30 local corporate groups that support us today.

Our staff is highly trained to work with families and family backgrounds to find appropriate housing and housing benefits: federal, state, & local governments, as well as private sources. Similarly, once the family situation is better understood the staff helps with referrals to other agencies and institutions that support education and training to move the family into a more sustainable livelihood. We have hired an "after-shelter" facilitator who continues frequent contact with the families after moving into permanent housing to prevent a return to homelessness.

We have a staff of 7 highly trained and skilled consultants, including our Executive Director, Linda Rabolt. The staff includes: 1 Case Manager, 1 Day Center Coordinator, 2 Homeless Crisis Response Coordinators, 1 Special Events Coordinator (e.g. family finance, nutrition, and housekeeping education programs), and 1 Office Assistant. We also have two CDL drivers to shuttle the families from shelter to day center to work and education sites.

We also maintain a warehouse of gently used furniture that the families can chose (free) as the move into their permanent housing. The warehouse also has a two bedroom apartment that we have converted to a elementary/high school online facility for students to continue their education during the Covid crisis.

- We have served over 850 families find housing in the 20 years of operation. We track year-over-year trends.
- In 2019 we supported 43 families, 127 individuals, 74 children, 43 children under 6, and 9 unborn children through birth.
- We have referred over 14,000 referrals since our founding with1168 in 2019.
- We hired an after-shelter coordinator in 2018 and are working through historic data on family abilities to remain in permanent housing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Homeless and near-homeless families in Warren County Ohio. We provide temporary housing and grants to near-homeless families to remain housed. Our staff works with the families to identify permanent housing, education, and job improvement programs.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our clients, homeless families, were concerned about online elementary and high school learning since the parents work during the day and were isolated in motel rooms otherwise. We setup a wifi area and provided tablets to the children to maintain their school work during the day. We also got retired teachers to volunteer for administrating the facility supporting the socially distanced students.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Interfaith Hospitality Network of Warren County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Interfaith Hospitality Network of Warren County

Board of directors
as of 4/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. David Yelton

Tom Ludeke

Todd Rockstroh

Rev. Mary Joseph

Paul Dillenburger

Rev. Jackie Mattisse

Ms. Jenniffer Goepper

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/13/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/19/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.