Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, Inc.

Connecting people with wild places.

aka Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation   |   Hungry Horse, MT   |  www.bmwf.org

Mission

The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation connects Americans with their wilderness heritage by providing access to and stewardship of one of the world’s most spectacular places – Montana’s Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex, the crown jewel of the Wilderness System. We help hundreds of hard-working volunteers, including youth, develop a land ethic and give back to the wilderness by opening trails, restoring heavily used areas, maintaining historic structures and fighting weeds. Active wilderness stewardship is our mission.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Bill Hodge

Program Director

Rebecca Powell

Main address

PO Box 190688

Hungry Horse, MT 59919 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1597921

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex (BMWC), located in northwest Montana, includes 1.5 million acres of designated Wilderness including the Great Bear, Bob Marshall, and Scapegoat Wilderness Areas. It is considered by many to be the crown jewel of American Wilderness. As federal funding for recreation and wilderness declines, the Forest Service is challenged to maintain the extensive trail system within the BMWC. Second, noxious weeds threaten the ecological integrity of the BMWC ecosystem and thus the largest intact native elk herd in the lower 48 states. Lastly, the number of youth in the US that actively recreate in the outdoors is in decline.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Trail Maintenance, Weed Suppression, and Habitat Restoration

BMWF maintains and restores trails, removes invasive weeds and conducts other conservation projects that preserve Wilderness. We are raising the next generation of conservation leaders by providing paid internships in the outdoors that lead to skills and competencies towards natural resource careers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

BMWF is working to raise the next generation of conservation leaders through offering paid internships and apprenticeships that help college age youth develop skills and competencies towards natural resource careers. In the Wilderness Conservation Corps work as a team to build trail and work on a diversity of wilderness projects that give them a breadth of experience in Wilderness Management.
In the Packer Apprentice Program youth gain valuable skills and training with stock handling and back country packing. Apprentices attend a 5 day packing clinic at the renowned Nine Mile Wilderness Training Center and assist BMWF Master packers on 6 pack trips where they practice and perfect the skills of building pack loads and livestoce handling from an expert packer.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Enduring Service - Volunteer and Service Award 2019

USDA Forest Service

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 1997, The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation (BMWF) has engaged adult and youth volunteers and interns in trail maintenance, invasive weed suppression, and other conservation work to minimize human impacts within the BMWC. The BMWF has been a crucial U.S. Forest Service partner since 1997 and is a member of the 21st Century Conservation Service Corp. Together they promote wilderness conservation skills and education through volunteer and internship programs in the lower 48's wildest wilderness area and surrounding roadless areas.
The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation:
• Provides conservation stewardship for the crown jewel of the Wilderness system –
the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex
• Engages youth and adults in life changing back country experiences
• Helps keep open 1700 miles of trail to quite places
• Works to keep the wilderness wild and preserve habitat for the lower 48's largest
elk heard by fighting invasive species
• Is raising the next generation of Wilderness stewards through internships and
apprenticeships that teach traditional skills and provides career paths to natural
resource related careers
• Ensures that future generations will continue to have access to 'The Bob'

The objectives of a BMWF projects are to: 1) Engage volunteers in wilderness stewardship projects that restore and maintain trails, suppress noxious weeds, and remove user impacts; 2) Build a public land ethic by educating youth and adults on topics of cultural and natural resources such as ecology, bear awareness, and Leave No Trace ethics; and 3) Encourage youth (and adults) to participate in outdoor activities and live healthy lifestyles.

Each year BMWF engages up to 350 BMWF volunteers, ages 12 to 80, participate in 40 Wilderness projects. Projects are accomplished in coordination and cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service on trails and land within the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex.

Volunteer trail maintenance projects include opening and maintaining trail tread, construction and maintenance of water diversions to prevent erosion and protect water quality within pristine wilderness streams. Project work also includes campsite restoration and/or obliteration involving site analysis, vegetative restoration, social trail obliteration, stock containment management, and fire ring and litter removal.

Additional volunteer projects include noxious weed reconnaissance, mapping, and suppression using hand-pulling and herbicide spraying techniques. Volunteers work with a BMWF crew leader who is Forest Service trained in noxious weed identification and eradication. Noxious weed projects increases public awareness as well as managing threatening weed infestations.

The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation recruits, trains, and places volunteers on projects compatible with their strengths, knowledge and time constraints by providing projects that vary in length and physical demands. Projects last 3 to 9 days and may be trailhead based to 32 miles deep in the wilderness.

BMWF is also helping raise the next generation of Conservation Leaders through offering Wilderness Conservation Internships. These are field based training programs for college and high school students who hope to pursue careers in natural resource related fields. Through field based work on Wilderness trails, invasive weed suppression projects, and Wilderness monitoring tasks, interns gain valuable job skills that build career opportunities in the Forest Service and nonprofit partner field.
The Foundation is also hopes to build the next generation of Wilderness packers. Volunteer pack support is an integral part of the work BMWF does and the Bob has a uniquely rich heritage of stock use, which has helped to shape the character of the Complex and its users, as well as support its conservation and stewardship. However, despite this deeply engrained heritage, packing is a fading skill. The current generation of packers is aging, and there are few young packers being trained to replace them. In BMWF's packer apprentice program, youth attend a week long packing clinic taught at the highly regarded Ninemile Wilderness Training Center. Following certification, apprentices assist a BMWF Master Packers on six (6) pack trips in support of BMWF crews. These experiences provide training in stock safety, packing mule loads, handling a variety of animals, using different styles of packing, safety on the trail, and wilderness skills.

The Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation (BMWF) has been serving the wilderness recreation community for over twenty (20) years. Our humble beginning was launched by a half time seasonal Program/Volunteer Manager and we have now grown to 3 full-time staff and 6 seasonal staff including an Executive Director, Program Director, Outreach Coordinator, Intern Coordinator (seasonal), and 5 Crew Leaders (seasonal).
The Executive Director handles all financial management, business transactions, writes and manages grants, communicates with donors, and supervises lead staff. The Program Director builds the project calendar, hires, supervises, and trains crew leaders, recruits volunteers and creates and coordinates project plans 40 Wilderness Stewardship Projects each year. The Outreach Coordinator is responsible for communication with donors and members, volunteers, and for local and national marketing of BMWF's programs, and plans 3 fundraising events a year. The Intern Coordinator selects and trains Wilderness Interns and acts as a mentor and project planner for all interns from May to September, and helps carry out all aspects of two internship programs and the Packer apprentice program.

Since its incorporation in 1997, the Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation (BMWF) and its volunteers have cleared over 5,000 miles of trail and treated 100's of acres of invasive species. The value of this labor donated to national forest lands is approximately $500,000 annually.

In a typical year BMWF volunteers:
Hike 700 miles, Pack 350 horse and mule loads,
and
Maintain up to 250 miles of trail by:
- Cutting 3,000 downed trees out of trails,
- Maintaining 15,000 yards of trail tread,
- Cleaning debris from 400 water diversions,
- Removing brush from 80 miles of trail corridor,
- Treating 20 to 30 acres of invasive weeds.
The total value of this labor donated to public lands has been valued at up to $500,000 annually.

For the past 5 years BMWF has been growing it's internship programing. This will be the emphasis in the future as the Foundation grows to fill the growing need for utilizing volunteer labor to maintain trails on National Forest Lands.

Financials

Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sara Boilen

Bob Marshall Wilderness Foundation

Term: 2016 - 2021

Al Koss

Lynn VanHorn

Sara Boilen

Becca Wheeler

Secretary

Josh Kroll

Vice-Chair

Eric Belanger

Treasurer

Terry Knupp

Frank Vitale

Randy Gayner

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No