PLATINUM2024

Children of Vietnam

Building Bright Futures by Lifting Children Out of Poverty

aka Children of Vietnam   |   Greensboro, NC   |  https://childrenofvietnam.org

Mission

Building Bright Futures by Lifting Children Out of Poverty Children of Vietnam lifts children out of poverty by eliminating barriers to fulfilling their potential through comprehensive services that focus on one child, one family, and one community at a time.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Ms. Giang Wells-Dang

Main address

PO Box 18039

Greensboro, NC 27419 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1605964

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

International Relief (Q33)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the last few decades, Vietnam has made remarkable progress in reducing poverty, even though there have been setbacks caused by the pandemic and severe effects of global warming Political and economic reforms launched in 1986 have transformed Vietnam from one of the poorest countries in the world, with per capita income below $100, to a lower middle-income country with per capita income of $3,756.50 by the end of 2021.(World Bank) Yet, Vietnam’s poor and ethnic minority children and their families still have challenges. Delving deeper into the intra-country statistics, there is evidence of a growing disparity between those who shifted from agriculture to the manufacturing and service sectors (Asia Fund Managers: https://www.asiafundmanagers.com/us/) and those most vulnerable populations including manual laborers, people with disabilities, women, migrants, children and ethnic minorities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Increasing Opportunities for Children with Disabilities Initiative: Hope System of Care

We empower children with disabilities and their families by providing individualized and comprehensive services to improve health, educational opportunities, safe living environments, nutrition and hygiene. Greater opportunities for independent living, higher education and vocational training allow youth to thrive and achieve their life goals and their families to develop stable incomes.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
People with disabilities

We nourish young children’s bodies to ensure healthy physical, intellectual, social and emotional development, partnering with organizations which produce vitamin fortified meals. We distribute them to 2-5 year olds attending kindergartens in rural and mountainous regions. Further, we work with local school systems to provide daily nutritious soy milk to kindergarten children. We train school staff on soy milk preparation and equipment and the school system provides the needed space to produce the milk.




Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

We enable university students from poor families to graduate with degrees that will prepare them to gain full employment, raise their standard of living, and fulfill their dreams by achieving lifelong goals.


Population(s) Served
Young adults
Students

We empowers bright students from poor families by financially supporting their educational goals. Students receive long term scholarships and after school tutoring in core subjects. They engage in enrichment activities which support their ability to lead, collaborate, develop brainstorming and problem solving skills, as well as build self confidence, ingenuity and resilience in their fast changing environments. After graduation, many students become recipients of our Bright Scholars University Scholarship program.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Students

We facilitate young (2-5 year olds), ethnic minority children living in remote, mountainous villages with a strong educational foundation by constructing well built, permanent and easily accessible classrooms. Vietnamese teachers, equipped with fully furnished classrooms with preschool teaching tools supplied by COV, instill a love of learning that will serve the children well and encourage them to seek further education in their communities.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Students

We invest in groups of enterprising, poor, single mothers with school age children to face financial and personal challenges with dignity and strength, believe in their own abilities, and achieve fulfilling futures. The mothers are offered micro-loans for small businesses and the training needed to run them; educational scholarships for their children; and community building opportunities to share their challenges and knowledge with others in their group.


Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth
Students
Low-income people

We ensure children have access to clean water, sanitation and good hygiene to promote healthy development, and a safe environment in which to thrive.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students
Teachers
Low-income people

Where we work

Awards

Champion Medal honored Ms. Huong for ten years of service 2009

Danang Foreign Affairs and People’s Committees

Remarkable Contribution for the Economic and Social Development of Province 2008

Quang Nam People's Committee

Contribution in humanitarian Activities of Danang City 2008

Chairman of Danang People's Committee

Excellent Achievement in Work for Poor Children of Hai Chau District 2008

Hai Chau People's Committee

Significant Achievement in Work of Protection and Taking Care of Children 2008

Hoa Vang People's Committee

Top Rated 2021

Great Nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

AmCham 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of schools built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Age groups

Related Program

Educating for the Future Initiative: Kindergarten Building Blocks

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Kindergarten classrooms for (2-5 year olds) built near remote, ethnic minority villages.

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Extremely poor people, Low-income people

Related Program

Educating for the Future Initiative: Bright Scholars University Scholarships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children with disabilities receiving early intervention services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Adolescents, Children, Extremely poor people, Low-income people

Related Program

Increasing Opportunities for Children with Disabilities Initiative: Hope System of Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Empowering Single Mothers Initiative: Empowering Foundations for Women & Their Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children reached with a meal each school day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Extremely poor people, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Keeping Children Nourished Initiative: Lunch and Learn

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

COV has identified three groups of children who are particularly vulnerable: children with disabilities, poor rural and ethnic minority children, and children living with single mothers. While these groups have similarities low socio-economic status, limited educational and/or medical access, etc. each also have unique challenges, strengths, and opportunities to have an improved life and brighter prospects. We aim to educate, financial support, feed and provide medical assistance to our three groups of vulnerable children.

COV’s key strategies include effective, individualized, comprehensive, and best practice programming which targets specific populations: children whose families live below the poverty line, have intermittent and low-paying jobs, and severely limited number of breadwinners in a family. We focus on children with disabilities caused by the long-term effects of Agent Orange over generations and who have other health and genetic conditions. We support ethnic minority children whose families live in remote, mountainous regions and live on subsistent farms. We build stronger single-parent families by providing micro-loans and job skills training for single mothers. We focus on the education of poor children as a means to end the poverty cycle.

COV has significantly benefited from strong, visionary, and goal-driven leadership over the years. Our new, high energy, change making Executive Director transitioned into her new role smoothly as of August 2022. COVs 16-member, working Board of Directors form a strong team, designing and evaluating an up-to-date three-year strategic plan (2022-2025) which includes committees for programming, marketing, fundraising, and financial growth. We value gender equity at the board and staff levels.
Our Vietnamese staff members work as a team and are expertly managed by our Vietnamese Country Director. They are well trained (receiving regular staff development) and give our beneficiaries compassionate, dedicated, and effective support. Our U.S. staff is lean and efficient in working with our donors and managing administrative responsibilities. All staff members are experienced, flexible, open to innovation, and productive in implementing programs and improving the lives of the poor children and their families we serve.
COVs Executive Director, Country Director, Board of Directors, and staff members communicate effectively. Our Executive Director, and Board meet quarterly; our committees meet monthly; and our Executive Director, Country Director, and Vietnamese staff members meet weekly to exchange information and carry out the organizations mandates.
COV builds capacity by partnering with local Vietnamese government officials and non-profit organizations. We seek partnerships in the U.S. to help achieve our goals. (Rotary Clubs, Kiwanis, Rise Against Hunger, and charitable foundations). In addition, we have built a relationship with the Vietnamese Rotary Clubs, American Chamber of Commerce in Vietnam, and VUFO-NGO Resource Center. We enlist Vietnamese professionals in the medical, educational, financial, and psycho-social fields to partner with us in providing the best services to our beneficiaries.
COVs best practices include the using technology to create accurate and concise records, in the field and at the office. Each child and family has a log for recording assessments and achievable goals. Especially for children with disabilities, each child has an individualized care plan and a committed team of medical, educational, and psycho-social experts working together for the good of each child and their family. All programming includes monitoring and evaluation over multiple years to compare achieved results; gain feedback from the beneficiaries, educators and doctors; and improve programming strategies based on results and feedback.
COV implements programs that support the tenets of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: No Poverty, Zero Hunger, Good Health and Well-being, Quality Education, Gender Equality, Clean Water and Sanitation, Reduced Inequalities, and Partnerships for the Goals. These tenets are achievable by designing programs that address the needs of children and their families.

Children of Vietnam has been operating in Central Vietnam since 1998. We started as a very small organization doing relief and crisis work. We now work to build the capacity of individuals along with our local partners to increase community sustainability. As of 2023, we have:

Empowering Foundations for Women & Their Children
672 Total number of single mothers
XX Total number of children

University Bright Scholars
280 Total number of university graduates
XX Total number of female university graduates

Study Steps Tutoring & Life-Skills
Five groups totaling 280 children beginning in 6th grade

Hope System of Care
1,102 Total children with disabilities
XX Girls
XX Boys

Nutrition School Food Distribution
Over 1 million meals yearly

Kindergarten Building Blocks
56 kindergarten classrooms for children, 2 through 5 years of age

COV enables children and their parents to become changemakers in
their own communities by providing them with the knowledge and
skills to be economically self-sufficient, build community with other families, know their rights as citizens, access government and other resources to improve their lives and the lives of those in their communities.

What's next?

Under the leadership of our new Executive Director, COV is undergoing extensive reviews of programming, finances, marketing, media presence, communication, and staff development, both in Vietnam and the U.S. In addition, board involvement, donor relations, partnerships, technology, and capacity building and sustainability is also being reviewed and improved.

COV stays current in our understanding of Vietnam government policy changes, new and important areas of development, additional best practices with programming, training staff to adjust to local conditions and better addressing of beneficiary needs, and being prepared to support our children and their families in times of personal crisis, as well as during and after natural disasters.

We continue to develop ways to increase our scholarship students preparation for the demands and needs for 21st century skill development. We encourage students to gain important knowledge in fields of interest, foster their creativity, innovation, critical thinking, problem solving and collaboration skills. We engage them in technology and share ways to use the technology both at school and at home, in preparation for the working world. We emphasize their abilities of self-direction and adaptability in order to thrive in their ever changing environments.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Children of Vietnam
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Children of Vietnam

Board of directors
as of 04/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Scott Willis

Sales Director

Term: 2018 - 2026


Board co-chair

Ms. Helena Berger

Benjamin C. Wilson

Retired - Founder

Dabney W. Schmitt

Retired - Development Director

Elliott Wilson

President, TRC Professional Solutions

Debbie Baker

Retired Educator

Scott Willis

Sales Director

Thao Sommerville

Self-employeed

Kathy Orms

Retired HR/Organizational Development Executive

Lyn Greer

Public Relations Executive

Desta Raines

Director of Sustainability, Sephora Americas

Helena Berger

Retired CEO disability non-profit

Maddi Niedbanck

e-Commerce Coordinator, Hermès

Willie Tran

Chemist - R. J. Reynolds

Andrew Lysaught

Computer Scientist

Nia Silgardo

Asset Management - Neuberg Berman

Benjamin C Wilson, Jr.

Consumer Product Development - Back of Our Napkin, LLC

John Merson

Real Estate Management

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/3/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.