PLATINUM2022

UpSpring

Cincinnati, OH   |  www.upspring.org

Mission

UpSpring's mission is to empower children experiencing homelessness by providing opportunities for education and enrichment. Our vision is to positively transform our communities by breaking the cycle of homelessness and poverty. As Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky's only non-profit exclusively serving the educational needs of homeless children and youth, UpSpring provides these students with the consistency needed to achieve academic success and become well-rounded, active participants in their community. A consistent education breaks the cycle of childhood homelessness and elevates kids, families, and communities.

Ruling year info

1999

Executive Director

Alex Kuhns

Main address

P.O. Box 23300

Cincinnati, OH 45223 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Faces Without Places

EIN

31-1628027

NTEE code info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

THE FACTS ABOUT CHILDHOOD HOMELESSNESS There are more than 8,000 children who experience homelessness in Greater Cincinnati each year. Nearly half of children in the Greater Cincinnati area live in poverty - between the 2nd and 4th worst rate in the country. Kentucky has the worst childhood homelessness rate in the country. Today, in the U.S., the average age of a person experiencing homelessness is 9 years old. Only 25% of students experiencing homelessness graduate from high school. Profile of an average local family experiencing homelessness: single mother age 30 with 2 kids under the age of 6. Children experiencing homelessness are typically 2 to 3 years behind in school.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

UpSpring Summer 360

UpSpring Summer 360 (formerly Yellow Bus Summer Camp) is an educational and enrichment-based program for local children experiencing homelessness. Each morning our students (ages five to twelve) focus on literacy and math lessons delivered by licensed teachers. In the afternoon our students engage in enrichment, fitness, and other activities. One day a week is generally reserved for an off-site field trip. UpSpring provides transportation and meals to the students each day, completely free of charge.

The Program's objectives are:
-To improve students’ literacy and math skills
-To boost students’ social, emotional, and physical health
-To expand enrichment opportunities and important childhood events

UpSpring Summer 360 has proven results for our region’s most at-risk students. For example, our pre and post-testing shows that 95% of our students retained or increased their literacy and/or math skills. Furthermore, metrics designed in conjunction with Dr. James Canfield of the University of Cincinnati revealed measurable increases in several “well-being measures” including health, self-confidence, stability, belonging, hope, and comfort. Students who are housed have more hope as their basic needs are met. When a young person is focused more on survival than aspiration, then he/she is far more likely to give up. UpSpring provides hope for a better future.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Children and youth

Through UpSpring Resource Collaborative, we work with over 60 direct service providers (such as schools, shelters, and agencies) to identify and meet the needs of children experiencing homelessness by providing items that they need to attend and succeed in school.

The items include bus passes and gas cards, school supplies, book bags, school uniforms, personal hygiene items and more. It is through our collective approach for improving school achievement that we are able to have a measurable impact on the children we serve and our community as a whole.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Homeless people

UpSpring After School provides educational opportunities with a service-learning curriculum to students experiencing homelessness at Newport Intermediate School in Newport, KY.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Difference Maker 2012

Cincinnati Children's Museum

Outstanding Individual Working in a Program to Beth Griffith-Niemann 2012

National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth

Affiliations & memberships

Community Shares 2003

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of children felt healthy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Homeless people

Related Program

UpSpring Summer 360

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of children felt they could be successful at school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Homeless people

Related Program

UpSpring Summer 360

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of children had hope for the future

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Homeless people

Related Program

UpSpring Summer 360

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

UpSpring enables students experiencing homelessness to have the same access to opportunity as all other children. We provide the necessary resources for these children to get to school, stay in school, and succeed in school. Our programs & services change lives, and therefore our region, for the better.

UPSPRING SUMMER 360°
A seven-week summer day-camp that provides structure for continued learning and academic skill-set retention. In preparing for the school year ahead, the curriculum addresses math, literacy, and social-emotional intelligence, with an emphasis on fun and enrichment.

UPSPRING RESOURCE COLLABORATIVE
We work with over 70 direct service providers to meet the needs of children experiencing homelessness by distributing items needed to attend & succeed in school.

UPSPRING AFTER SCHOOL
Site specific programming uniquely designed to meet the extra-curricular education and enrichment needs of students ages 9-18

Our experienced Program Team has developed and implemented a well-rounded and balanced curriculum based on trauma-informed care. They integrate a variety of experiences, educational lessons, and exploratory opportunities to ensure that students are empowered during their summer with UpSpring. Year after year, this program has proven results. We feel very confident in the structure of this program and know the importance of it for the students who partake.

Since our founding in 1998, we've elevated more than 45,000 children experiencing homelessness. Each year UpSpring empowers the lives of approximately 3,500 children experiencing homelessness in our region. We are looking to expand our programming to additional school sites to be able to serve more children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children experiencing homelessness

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We changed tactics with math lessons to reflect our digital age and increase participation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The children we serve are at the forefront of everything we do; listening to their feedback helps us meet them where they're at.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

UpSpring
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UpSpring

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ryan Higgins

EY

Term: 2019 -

Rebecca Riegelsberger

The E.W. Scripps Co.

Kara Wysinski

Barnes Dennig

Jordan Celestin

KPMG

Courtney Barlow-Schulte

Working in Neighborhoods

Jonathon Bresnen

Mariner Wealth Advisors

Antwone Cameron

Thomas More University

Vagelis Kontopos

The E.W. Scripps Co.

Kelsey Mehaffie

Thompson Hine LLP

Margaret Palmer

Johnson Investment Council

Lena Stringham

Anthem, Inc.

Wendy Ungard

Cincinnati Children's Hospital

Denise Weinstein

Envoi Design

Tamara Vest

National Government Services

Tamara Vest

National Government Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/9/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.