COROLLA WILD HORSE FUND INC

Keep em Wild and Free

Corolla, NC   |  http://www.corollawildhorses.org

Mission

The mission of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund is to protect, preserve, and responsibly  manage the herd of wild Colonial Spanish Mustangs roaming freely on the northernmost Currituck Outer Banks, and to promote the continued preservation of this land as a permanent sanctuary for horses defined as a cultural treasure as designated as the state horse by the state of North Carolina.

Ruling year info

2001

Chief Operating Officer

Ms. Jo Langone

Main address

P. O. Box 361 1130E Corolla Village Road

Corolla, NC 27927 USA

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EIN

31-1810713

NTEE code info

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Protection of the approximately 100 wild Spanish Mustangs in the Northern Outer Banks and the education of visitors to raise awareness of proper and safe behavior when visiting the area are our top priorities.. In the 1920's, 5000 to 6000 horses were estimated to roam freely on all of the Outer Banks. Due to development, the herd has been confined to a small area in the northern end of Currituck County. The Fund was organized in 1989 when a group of caring citizens recognized the need to heighten awareness about the presence of Outer Banks horses between Duck, NC and the Virginia border. Eleven horses had been hit and killed on Highway 12 between 1985 (when the road between Duck and Corolla was paved) and 1989. Between 1985 and 1995, a total of twenty horses were hit. It was in 1996 that fences were erected, and all the horses moved to the north beaches for their own protection. They were designated as the North Carolina State Horse in May 2010.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption

Our adoption program offers opportunities for the public to physically adopt a gentled Spanish Mustang.

If a wild horse becomes too habituated to humans, becomes seriously ill, or is critically injured, the Fund may have to capture and permanently remove them. We also must remove and raise orphaned foals.

Once rehabilitated, a wild horse cannot be returned to the wild because it has been exposed to domestic horses either at the equine hospital or stable where it received care. A disease could be carried back to the wild herd for which they have no immunity. Additionally, in the course of saving it’s life, the horse will require extensive handling and will likely approach humans if returned to the wild.

Population(s) Served

Each year the Corolla Wild Horse Fund hosts over 100,000 visitors at the its Wild Horse Museum. Visitors learn about the history of the wild horses, how the herd is managed, and the challenges faced as we further our mission to keep them wild and free. The museum and museum gift shop is open year round.

In addition, the Fund operates a Sanctuary Observation/Patrol program. Staff patrol the beach and behind dunes daily with a dual purpose. Not only do they gather data in detail about the sightings of the horses but they also educate the 50,000 to 60,000 visitors that arrive each week during the high season about proper behavior while in that area of the horses and about the Wild Horse Ordinance that protects the horses.

Educational summer activities such as Meet a Mustang and Paint a Mustang are available for children. Some of these activities are done on our premises and some are out in the community.

The weekly summer Mustang Morning events at our rehabilitation farm gives visitors the ability to meet the rescued Corolla horses currently in our care, hear their stories, and learn the history of this legendary breed, only found on the Outer Banks. We also conduct open houses throughout the year at this facility.

We are also available as a resource for community events where education is the focus.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Managing wild horses on 7,544 acres of diverse habitat that includes roughly 700 houses, thousands of people, and hundreds of vehicles presents many complex challenges. Responsible wild horse management requires 100% dedication. As the guardians of the wild herd, we respond 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Herd Management Includes breed conservation, contraceptive darting, soil and plant studies, DNA testing, emergency response, necropsy, fence and cattle guard maintenance, habitat preservation, and advocacy.

Each wild horse is documented and entered into a database. and much time is spent in the field monitoring the harems, documenting body condition, habitat usage, harem composition, determining breed conservation, and reproduction control methods. Horses are not branded or micro chipped. They are identified by color, markings, and their home territories. As many as six aerial counts are conducted by helicopter and compared to field notes.

A full time Herd Manager and Sanctuary Observers monitor the herd on a daily basis, documenting their health and behaviors, responding to emergencies, and transporting injured horses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Severely injured or habituated horses are removed from the wild as a last resort. Fractured bones, deep wounds, and severe colic are some of the reasons for rescue intervention.

The Fund was given the opportunity to purchase the Betsy Dowdy Equine Center, a 31-acre facility in Grandy where our rescued mustangs have been residing since 2014. Rescue and conservation are key components of our mission and we have recognized the need for a permanent “off-island” sanctuary.

Every horse that requires removal from the wild has a stable, permanent home on our farm. It is a peaceful, quiet place where injured, ill, or otherwise suffering rescued horses can decompress, heal, and be slowly domesticated. They will receive the specialized veterinary care that they need as they adapt and adjust to human contact and a new diet. After that, they may enter into our adoption program or they may live with us forever if they require special care.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Non Profit of the Year 2008

Currituck County Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Humane Society of the United States 2007

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Protective legislation, the Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act, has been passed by the United States House of Representatives twice but has not passed by the Senate. One of our goals is for the Corolla wild horses to have the same protection that the wild horses on Shackleford Banks (Cape Lookout National Seashore) have enjoyed since 1998 (Shackleford Banks Act)

2. We have an ongoing effort to acquire land in the wild horse area. Unfortunately, 70% of the land is privately owned and potentially subject to development. With each tract of land we acquire, more land can be conserved for the wild horses and other wildlife. As human/horse interaction increases, the need for land designated for the wild horses increases.

3. Raising awareness and educating the public of their historic and cultural significance while stressing the importance to protect and conserve this highly threatened herd of wild horses is vital for their long-term survival.

4. As part of our long-term strategic planning, we recognized that charting all of the relationships among the wild horses, and creating a family tree that can be used to help us responsibly manage breeding and track family lines through many different generations is essential for our work with the herd.

The Corolla Wild Horse Fund will build national, state, and local alliances that will enable the organization to effectively protect and conserve the Colonial Spanish Mustang breed in general, and to specifically maintain the optimum physical and genetic health and safety of the wild herd roaming the northernmost Currituck Outer Banks. This will be achieved through increased and diversified sources of funding, sufficient and qualified staff, and continued CWHF Board development and growth.

The CWHF has a diverse and engaged Board of Directors and we employ a Chief Operating Officer and a Chief Financial Officer. Our Herd Manager is a lifelong horse person as well as is our Trainer/Registry Manager. We also have a staff of Sanctuary Observers to collect data in the field and educators in our Museum/Gift Shop.


We have grown our board to include the skill sets necessary for growth and success and worked hard to foster partnerships with national humane and advocacy organizations that now support and promote our mission.

* Implementation of a successful contraception program to affect better overall health of the horses and lessen the risk of birth defects;
* The body condition of our horses is optimum;
* We were successful in engaging elementary school children in a campaign to have our wild horses designated as the North Carolina State Horse:
* Protective federal legislation has passed the United States House of Representatives unanimously twice and a companion bill was introduced in the US Senate. The former Executive Director testified before a Congressional Committee twice.
* We created a Freedom Fund for the purchase and upkeep of land for the wild horses. Thirty-two acres have been donated to date.
* We purchased a 31-acre equine facility for the rehabilitation and training of injured or sick wild horses. The horses that will not be eligible for adoption will be cared for for the remainder of their lives on the farm.
* We have a new 22-panel educational exhibit in our new location in the Old Village of Corolla.
* We are working with geneticists from Texas A&M University and UC-Davis for genetic analysis of our DNA project. In some of these instances, we are not only obtaining data for charting of family lines and genetics but also for studies of particular gene traits.

Financials

COROLLA WILD HORSE FUND INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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COROLLA WILD HORSE FUND INC

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kimberlee Hoey

Twiddy & Co

Term: 2009 -

Kimberlee Hoey

Twiddy & Co

Matthew Hewes

Certified Public Accountant

Bob White

Currituck County Commissioner

Jane Webster

Community Activist/Hilton Garden Inn/Ramada Inn

Richard Brown

Business Owner

Mike Dianna

Business Owner

Elzabeth White

The World Bank/Global Econ Dev

Jean-Paul Peron

Realtor

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data