BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE GREATER TWIN CITIES

aka BBBS Twin Cities   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  http://www.bigstwincities.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported, one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

Ruling year info

2002

Chief Executive Officer

Pat Sukhum

Main address

3110 Washington Ave N

Minneapolis, MN 55411 USA

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Formerly known as

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Minneapolis

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Saint Paul

EIN

32-0017737

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community-based Mentoring

Approximately 2,000 children are enrolled in the Community-based program. Each is matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister – a carefully screened and interviewed adult volunteer mentor. Each match is paired based on common interests and backgrounds, complementary personalities, and the potential to form a long bond from the very start of their relationship. A highly-trained, committed Match Coordinator works with each child, volunteer and parent, regularly checking in to ensure the relationship is happy and strong. Matches meet on their own based on common interests, or join in one of many group activities scheduled by BBBS each month.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Matches in the School-based program meet at the Little’s school for one hour each week. Each of our thirteen partner schools have a high population of low-income and minority students, who may benefit the most from the additional support of a Big Brother or Big Sister. A BBBS Match Coordinator is on-site at each school to support Bigs and Littles with activity ideas, supervision and encouragement. School-based mentoring is especially important for children who might not otherwise be able to be Littles; their families may speak a different language or have an unstable living situation, or regular communication with the parent may not be feasible. Building the mentoring relationship at school provides additional support and structure for Bigs and Littles, enabling BBBS to serve over 500 additional youth.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

College and career readiness for our Littles

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

BBBS’ overall goal is to provide mentoring and enrichment opportunities for local youth so they can develop into well-rounded, successful community members. Additional goals include increasing multi-cultural activities to promote respect for all cultures and to create a welcoming environment, providing high quality programming for teens to increase the longevity of their matches, offering tools to plan their career and education futures, and ensuring the safety of children and volunteers.

To meet these goals, BBBS implements the following strategies: Recruiting, screening, and training Bigs who can serve as supportive, positive role models; Recruiting children who would benefit from having an additional role model in their lives; Matching Bigs and Littles based on compatible personalities, interests, and life experiences; Providing on-going support for these matches to ensure child safety and positive development; Offering two models of mentoring – community-based and school-based – depending on the child’s needs, family involvement, and volunteers’ schedules; and, Supplementing the impact of mentoring by offering enrichment programs for matches, including ongoing match activities on diverse subjects including sports, nature, arts, academics, and cultural events, college and career exploration and preparation assistance, workforce readiness programming, and leadership opportunities.

BBBS has the capacity to provide mentoring support and enrichment activities to at least 3,000 children a year in the 7 county metro area. This support includes mentoring screening and training, ongoing child safety precautions, and enrichment activities. The BBBS staff provide ongoing individual support for these matches, leading to average match lengths of 35 months for community-based and 19 months for the site-based programs, which are well above the national averages of 27 and 16 months, respectively. Because of the high quality services, BBBS received the Expert Partners seal from the Quality Mentoring Assessment Path, developed by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. This award is an official recognition of BBBS’ success in positively impacting youth during their developmental years. In 2013, Philanthropedia and Minnesota Philanthropy Partners rated BBBS the third best non-profit in Minnesota in terms of impact serving at-risk youth through educational support. The agency also received the Quality Award by the Nationwide Leadership Council of BBBSA in 2013. In 2011, it received the National Criminal Justice Association’s Outstanding Criminal Justice Program Award.

As measured by the Program Outcome Evaluation (POE) survey, youth involved in BBBS demonstrate the following progress over a year: 82% improved their self-confidence, 80% improved their ability to show trust, 70% improved their relationships with adults, 70% improved their sense of the future, 70% expanded their interests and hobbies, 70% were able to make better decisions, 67% improved their academic performance, 67% improved their attitude toward school, 54% improved their relationship with their families and 43% were able to better avoid delinquency.

In addition to the noticeable changes in child behavior, the 2013 Youth Outcome Survey (YOS) results established that mentoring services in both the community- and site-based programs helped youth see their own development through the following self-reported measures: 89% of community-based and 88% of site-based Littles reliably improved or maintained their level of social acceptance; 76% of community-based and 86% of site-based Littles reliably improved or maintained their educational expectations; 76% of community-based and 77% of site-based Littles reliably improved or maintained their level of parental trust.

Furthermore, national research demonstrates that BBBS’ mentoring programs result in youth who are 75% more likely to receive a four-year college degree than youth not involved with BBBS, and active Littles were 46% less likely to use illegal drugs. In 2012, 82% of Littles matched at the beginning of their senior years graduated from high school, compared to 56% of their similarly situated peers. These results demonstrate the strong impact mentoring can have on a child’s growth.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE GREATER TWIN CITIES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE GREATER TWIN CITIES

Board of directors
as of 7/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rick Penn

Retired CEO of Hutchinson Technologies

Term: 2017 - 2023

Jerry Allen

ARI

Miron Marcotte

Protiviti Incorporated

Robert McCollum

McCollum, Crowley, Moschet and Miller, Limited

Greg Myers

Lockridge Grindal Nauen

Lisa Casson

retired from Yahoo!

Jonathan Cooper

Optum, United Health Group

Schuyler Fauver

Breck School

Steve Hentges

Desserts Holding, Inc

Jamie Hofberger

Ernst & Young

Todd Kosel

PriceWaterhouseCoopers

Scott Nadeau

City of Maplewood

John Parrish

General Mills, Inc.

Kristine Rauenhorst

Rudder, LLC

Carol Smith

High Five Promo Marketing

Tom Welch

Paliside Asset Management

James Williams

retired from Global Vision Enterprises

Jared Bickler

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Joe Branch

Minnesota Timberwolves

Jennifer Carnahan

Republican Party of MN

Kristine Engman

Cargill

Marci Fabrega

Ecolab

Jeremy Heckman

Accredited Investors

Curt Mackenzie

Coldwell Banker Burnet

Pat Sukhum

Bind On-Demand Health Ins

Jim Torborg

APi Group Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data