World Listening Project

The Unquiet Earth

aka WLP   |   CHICAGO, IL   |  https://www.worldlisteningproject.org/

Mission

THE WORLD LISTENING PROJECT (WLP) is devoted to understanding the world and its natural environment, societies and cultures through the practices of listening and field recording. The WLP maintains a website and online forum about its artistic and educational activities. These include the use of radio and web-based technologies, conducting public workshops, forums, and lectures, as well as participating in exhibitions, symposiums, and festivals.

Notes from the nonprofit

The World Listening Project is a 501c3 charitable organization devoted to understanding the world and its natural environment, societies and cultures through the practices of listening and field recording. The WLP maintains a website and online forum about its artistic and educational activities. These include the use of radio and web-based technologies, conducting public workshops, forums, and lectures, as well as participating in exhibitions, symposiums, and festivals. Learn more about us at https://www.worldlisteningproject.org/about-us/

Ruling year info

2013

President & Board Chair

Mr. Eric Leonardson

Main address

1322 W SHERWIN AVENUE

CHICAGO, IL 60626 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0271008

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In a culture that privileges vision over other senses and ways of understanding the world, the soundscape and aurality have long been ignored. Technological innovations in sound recording and awareness of environmental changes have led to concern with the impact of sound upon people and all other living organisms. Beyond music there is a world of sound that are making and listening to, but also many of our sounds destroy the health of others. Few others are concerned with the impact of noise in health, human and animal communications, etc.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

World Listening Day

July 18th is the birth date of renowned Canadian composer, music educator, and author, R. Murray Schafer. His World Soundscape Project developed the fundamental ideas and practices of acoustic ecology in the 1970s. These inform the current, burgeoning interest in our changing acoustic environment. Thus, World Listening Day honors Schafer’s contribution to understanding our world. Since its inception in 2010, dozens of organizations and thousands of people from six continents have participated in World Listening Day.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations, Age groups

Related Program

World Listening Day

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

World Listening Day 2021 participation doubled in size, occurring in 147 cities, data collection is underway.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The awareness that the WLP seeks to promote helps to understand the relationships, and find a balance between sound makers and listeners. Listening is something we do, to be experienced by making. Educational efforts combine the knowledge and experiences of science and art. In the words of the renowned bioacoustician Bernie Krause, "A few remaining societies in our vast world know how to listen. It is an inherent part of their existence – one in which the received soundscapes of the forests, high plains, deserts, mountains and coastal regions combine seamlessly with the visual, olfactory, and tactile senses. In some tropical regions, dependence on acoustic perception supersedes that of all the others. Natural soundscapes serve as the inspiration for their song and dance. It heals them physically and spiritually. Western society bases most of what it knows on the visual. We actually “hear” what we “see.” The World Listening Project aims to transform that perception in our otherwise urban centric and abstracted lives. At a time when we are facing not only a silent spring, but a silent summer, fall and winter, as well, it is clear that where a picture is worth a thousand words, a soundscape may soon be worth a thousand pictures."

Public engagement and participation in the arts and sciences are critically important. The annual World Listening Day on July 18 draws together a global community of cultural institutions and individuals who interpret and plan activities around a theme devised by an artist. We also support and endorse projects through partnerships.

Since 2015 we have been honored to have a diverse group of acclaimed sound artists and composers creating the annual theme for World Listening Day: "H2O" by Leah Barclay from Australia, “Sounds Lost and Found” by Emeka Ogboh from Nigeria, “Listening to the Ground” by Pauline Oliveros (USA 1932-2016), FUTURE LISTENING by Filipino sound artist Teresa Barrozo, and "Listening With" by Annea Lockwood from the United States. Their participation was achieved on the strength of the idea and help from our small volunteer staff.

Since its inception in 2010, dozens of organizations and thousands of people from six continents have participated in World Listening Day. Among the ways we may grow future participation is in real time tracking to offer immediate visual (maps) and audio information on where and how many are participating in World Listening Day.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All people are listeners and producers of their soundscape. The WLP website and online forum engage a multi-generational audience through artistic and educational use of radio and web-based technologies, conducting public workshops, forums, and lectures, as well as participating in exhibitions, symposiums, and festivals. Most notably among these is World Listening Day. Initiated by the WLP in 2010, World Listening Day is an annual event that engages and expands the global community in varied practices and concerns of listening and field recording. The WLP invites all with Internet access to use its online participation surveys to provide information about public and private events, celebrations and projects for each World Listening Day.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Increased outreach to our community in the Global South.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It is difficult to identify how it has changed the relationship.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

World Listening Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

World Listening Project

Board of directors
as of 8/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Eric Leonardson

Leah Barclay

USC Sunshine Coast

Katherine Krause

Wild Sanctuary

Eric Leonardson

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Norman Long

Independent Artist

Amanda Gutierrez

Independent Artist

Emeka Ogboh

Independent Artist

Gurkan Mihci

IUPUI Herron School of Art and Design

Linda OKeeffe

Edinburgh College of Art

Dan Godston

Independent Artist

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/15/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.