PARTNERS FOR WORLD HEALTH

Recycling medical supplies to improve global health. Local effort. Global impact.

Portland, ME   |  www.partnersforworldhealth.org

Mission

Partners for World Health collects medical supplies and equipment from healthcare facilities, manufacturers, other organizations, and individuals. We sort, evaluate, repackage, and prepare these supplies and equipment for distribution to individuals, communities, and healthcare facilities in need. Our work limits the impact on the environment by diverting discarded materials from landfills and provides needed health care resources to the developing world. PWH aims to improve health conditions by sending medical personnel on medical missions to developing countries and educating New England communities about global health issues.

Ruling year info

2009

President and Founder

Elizabeth McLellan

Main address

40 Walch Drive

Portland, ME 04103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0276903

NTEE code info

Public Health Program (E70)

Recycling (C27)

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (S19)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Partners for World Health is working to address the need of more accessible high quality health care in under-served countries, while also addressing the excess amount of medical waste produced in the United States on a yearly basis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Medical Supply and Equipment Sustainability Program

PWH collects discarded medical supplies, equipment and furniture from hospitals, clinics and individuals. This program is the core of what PWH does, diverting viable and essential medical items from landfills and getting them to those in need. We are helping to sustain the environment and provide important supplies to those who can’t afford or otherwise gain access to them.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of pounds of medical surplus supplies shipped to communities in need

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

Medical Supply and Equipment Sustainability Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Partners for World Health is aiming to reduce medical waste, improve the quality of healthcare in under-served countries, and educate our local community about global healthcare issues.

We collect medical supplies that healthcare facilities in the U.S. are required to discard and ship them to countries in need. In addition, we organize medical missions to Southeast Asia and Africa for doctors, nurses, and students. While there are other non-profit organizations that send medical supplies to or provide medical care in the developing world, PWH is proud to be the only organization in the U.S. that does both. We strive to follow-up each shipment of medical supplies and equipment with a team of medical personnel. Lastly, we are committed to educating our community members about the importance of recycling and the disparities in healthcare around the world.

Our team is made up of an extraordinary group of volunteers ranging in age from 11 to 94. We have a strong network of medical staff who volunteer for us regularly. Everyone on our staff is involved because they have a passion for the cause. We now have a 15,000 sq. foot shipping center and an 11,000 sq. foot distribution center/office for sorting, boxing, and preparing shipments of medical supplies.

Since 2009, PWH has sent out approximately 48 containers to 70 countries. We have also lead 28 medical mission trips. In 2018 we plan to send out 12 to Ethiopia, Puerto Rico, Syria, Cameroon, Malawi, Ecuador, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

In addition to this international expansion, we have expanded our network across Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts. We have chapters at Universities across these States for students to contribute to our mission. We also have partnerships with Medical Facilities, Corporations, Non-Profits, other establishments across the states as you can see on our website.

In the future PWH plans to continue to grow the container program, the medical mission program, our partnerships, and medical projects (such as Project, 10,000). Our amazing team is full of impactful ideas (such as offering trade practices to the women in the brothels). We plan to incorporate these ideas into PWH after we increase our reach and funding.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We routinely survey volunteers, service recipients, and our partners. Our partners include donating hospitals, medical facilities and suppliers and those we ship equipment and supplies to in other countries.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    There was a perception that our focus was only on supporting clients in the developing world despite the fact that we routinely support thousands of local individuals through out community partner program. We featured success stories in our communications highlighting cases of our local service - which in turn increased uptake on those services - we also conducted outreach to our refugee populations to serve them and engage them in helping us enhance our cultural competencies when working overseas.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have dramatically expanded our committees and task forces and recruited community members to join them while staff and board serve on those committees to better engage with our external partners.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

PARTNERS FOR WORLD HEALTH
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PARTNERS FOR WORLD HEALTH

Board of directors
as of 4/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Elizabeth McLellan


Board co-chair

Ms Judy Parkhill

Retired

Term: 2017 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.