PLATINUM2024

Bluffton Jasper County Volunteers in Medicine

A Healthy Community Is A Better Community

aka BJVIM   |   Bluffton, SC   |  www.BJVIM.org

Mission

The mission of Greater Bluffton Jasper County Volunteers In Medicine is to provide free medical care in a compassionate and professional manner to the uninsured of Greater Bluffton and Jasper County with an emphasis on preventative medicine and health education.

Ruling year info

2010

Executive Director

Ms Pam Toney

Main address

29 Plantation Park Dr. Bldg 600 PO BOx 2653

Bluffton, SC 29910 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0298086

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Bluffton & Jasper County are rapidly expanding in population, and along with that increase in population is an increase in the number of underinsured or uninsured workers. The need our organization seeks to address is the provision of quality healthcare - with an emphasis on preventative care - to this growing population. The need is especially acute in South Carolina which did not opt into Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Free medical services to the uninsured

We are dedicated to serving the needs of our patients and providing the highest level of professional healthcare. No one in our community will go without access to quality healthcare. BJVIM serves individuals without health insurance who meet income guidelines at or below 250% of the US National Poverty levels. The services provided are care in cardiology, endocrinology, gynecology, mental health, internal medicine and optometry using volunteer physicians & nurses to provide patient care. We provide care for over 3,500 patients averaging over 5,000 patient visits per year annually.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Health
Economically disadvantaged people

We offer a monthly Diabetic Clinic to check A1C levels, dispense testing strips, glucometers and educate patients.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Health

BJVIM patients are referred to other providers if a medical conditions needs additional diagnoses or care that can not be remedied by in-house specialists. Through the efforts of our volunteer medical staff, the clinics have developed partnerships with local hospitals, labs, and specialists for patient referrals.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Health
Economically disadvantaged people

Dental care is offered free of charge to our patients.  We have been able to build an in-house Dental Clinic for consultations, education, cleanings and simple extractions. Other dental services are referred out to local dentists who provide services at a reduced rate to the clinics.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Health
Economically disadvantaged people

All BJVIM patients receive free eye exams and glasses through a partnership with local Lions Clubs and a volunteer Ophthalmologist who provides these services. Also, through a collaboration with the Medical University of South Carolina(MUSC), we provide Diabetic Retinopathy exams to detect eyesight issues as a result of Diabetes. MUSC is able to diagnose these examinations and provide treatment options.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Health

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Association of Free Clinics 2014

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals without a usual source of care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free medical services to the uninsured

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of persons with dental insurance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Dental Care

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All of our patients are without Medical or Dental insurance.

Number of clinic sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free medical services to the uninsured

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We offer clinics in both Bluffton and Ridgeland, South Carolina.

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free medical services to the uninsured

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

No one in our community will go without access to quality health care

Recruit and train medical and non medical volunteers to work at the clinic. Evaluate community health needs.Continue to seek community support to meet the needs of the community. Collaborate with other  health groups to meet the needs of the clinic and its patients

We continue to evaluate the size, scope and needs for our continued growth.  This growth comes in the need for additional volunteers, and seeking grants and expanding our donor base for sustainability. By assessing our patients' medical  needs we look to other health organizations to form collaborations.  These groups include hospitals, local doctors and nation organizations such as Americares to help with medical supplies.

A1c tests in additional to other diabetic tests can be performed at the clinic.  A diabetic counselor is now on staff and we have expanded our mental health services.  Dental needs are referred to a provider who sees approximately 25 of our patients per month. We now have a non-dispensing pharmacy at the clinic supplying drugs.  In the event a prescription is not available at the clinic, patients are enrolled in drug assistants programs.  We are a "medical home" to our patients.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, Reading skills are limited

Financials

Bluffton Jasper County Volunteers in Medicine
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Bluffton Jasper County Volunteers in Medicine

Board of directors
as of 02/13/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dan Wood

retired CEO - Palmetto Electric

Term: 2020 - 2024

Pam Toney

Executive Director

Kathleen Casey

Medical Director

Alexina Harter

VP Palmetto State Bank

Christina Brzezinski

Chief Nursing Office

Christopher Corkern

Pres., The Corkern Group

Qundal Gray

Retired Pharmacist

Daniel Wood

Bluffton City Council

Jim Evans

Retired Medical Sales

Luke Healy

Attorney

Christine Shaughnessy-Bush

Media Executive

William Campbell

Volunteer

Sarah Brock

County Clerk of the Court

Lawrence Taylor

CEO, Charter One Realty

Lisa Sulka

Retired, Mayor of Bluffton

Corey Tuten

Palmetto Electric

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/19/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.