International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF)

Wildlife Conservation Through Direct Action

aka IAPF   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.iapf.org

Mission

IAPF protects endangered wildlife and ecosystems by conducting anti-poaching operations, delivering ranger training, supplying equipment and technological solutions, and providing critical project management and administrative support to local communities engaged in preventing poaching and trafficking. Local empowerment and engagement play a critical role in reducing wildlife crime. IAPF’s community-focused operations are proving to be more effective and enduring than the highly militarized/adversarial anti-poaching tactics of the past. Our rangers are armed, and trained in military and policing skills, but they are also part of the communities in which they work. These communities are being given opportunities and incentives to “be the solution” — and they are responding magnificently.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Who and What of IAPF: We are backed financially by people just like you. Our conservation operations protect endangered wildlife and ecosystems every day. When: Founded in 2009 in Australia, IAPF was incorporated in the USA in 2013 and approved by the IRS as a nonprofit tax-exempt charity in 2014. Why: Illegal wildlife trafficking is one of the world’s largest criminal industries. Highly targeted species such as elephant and rhino are being hunted towards extinction. Where: Zimbabwe, Mozambique, South Africa, Kenya. Ongoing operational outcomes: In addition to safeguarding wildlife, IAPF’s anti-poaching work empowers women, protects community assets, creates jobs, promotes training and education, and reduces habitat destruction. We could use your help too!

Ruling year info

2014

Founder & CEO - IAPF Global

Mr. Damien Mander

Main address

100 N 18th St Ste 300

Philadelphia, PA 19103-2778 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0408734

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Elephants, rhinos, pangolins, and other species across Africa are being illegally killed at an alarming rate for their body parts. The continent's elephant populations have declined by 30% over 7 years, primarily due to poaching. This means 144,000 elephants could have been better protected. In South Africa alone, poachers killed 1,028 rhinos in 2017. These majestic and increasingly rare creatures are killed for their horns, tusks, and other parts. Some cultures use them as “medicine” or jewelry. But it’s all for profit - and driving iconic species toward extinction while disrupting vulnerable human communities. Much of this poaching/trafficking is done by the same organized crime networks moving drugs and weapons. They use military tactics and equipment to conduct their trade. In the cross-fire, many under-trained and poorly equipped rangers are killed or injured. Over 1,000 rangers were murdered in the line of duty over the past decade. IAPF is actively addressing these issues.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Akashinga ("The Brave Ones") female anti-poaching unit

IAPF's Akashinga program is

Innovative: It's a new way of conducting conservation work. In an industry where men outnumber women on the frontlines by up to 100:1, a primary strategy of Akashinga is female empowerment. Professionally trained, fully qualified, and tough-as-nails: These disadvantaged women are given employment protecting the wildlife reserves in their own regions.

Along with protection for local ecosystems, this program benefits families and local economies…as community development and conservation are blended for the benefit of all species.

Effective: IAPF’s Akashinga program is a new, holistic, sustainable, and entirely scalable model for large area wildlife conservation. And it is working!

In just the first nine months of frontline operations in Zimbabwe, the first Akashinga team made over 56 arrests, shattering local ivory poaching syndicates and paving the way for the future of local families and nature.

Community-based: Akashinga works WITH rather than AGAINST local populations through:
• Training and employment offered to local people
• Facilitating full financial participation of local women
• Supporting community development projects.

These are sound investments reaping long-term benefits for these communities — and for the protection of their surrounding ecosystems.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Victims and oppressed people

We identified a need and the solution: The world keeps looking to expensive and sophisticated solutions for conservation challenges.

After years on the ground working with a wide variety of people and places: We've realized that most often, the difference between the success and failure of a program is one good indigenous commander leading their rangers on the frontlines. This true local leadership is the biggest gap in conservation.

Our LEADRanger program re-builds management skills in the conservation industry by taking existing (and potential) anti-poaching instructors and leaders, giving them additional skills, and sending them back to their home region and train others. One of the most important skills we give them is teaching others. This “Train the Trainer” program provides unique experiences and “tools” for conservation law enforcement entities to share across a growing number of countries. For example, we've already had 2 trainers share their specialized knowledge with hundreds of others...and it has been less than a year since they began LEADRangers themselves.

We have trained people currently protecting wildlife and wild places in a variety of countries, and in the roles of conservation rangers, law enforcement, nonprofit, and more.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Adults

Targeting trafficking kingpins: This less discussed program focuses on the wildlife supply chain in southern Africa rather than just the poachers on the ground. SI conducts cross-border wildlife crime information gathering with the intention of publishing or prosecuting crimes against wildlife and the key figures involved.

We can't share much about this, other than this program is active, effective, and making a difference from deep within the shadows of black-markets and wildlife trafficking networks.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Adults

Long-term solutions must involve the public, so IAPF gives presentations to schools, clubs, organizations, and many others. We help people to understand the issues we're working on, so they are better positioned to help protect nature themselves and with us.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of rhinos protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In southern Africa where IAPF has operated, up to 10,000 rhinos were protected from poaching by ruthless criminal networks. In June 2018, we handed this successful operation over to locals.

Number of anti-poaching rangers through the LEADRanger course

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

LEADRanger: Empowering conservation leaders and trainers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Time- and energy-intensive, these highly customized training sessions focus on things like tracking, poaching forensics, field trauma, etc. Qualifying participants leave as trainers.

Number of LEADRanger participants attaining qualified Trainer status.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

LEADRanger: Empowering conservation leaders and trainers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These trainers have gone on to train more rangers in their home units, in multiple countries and parks, protecting uncountable species.

Poaching/trafficking arrests by Akashinga team (sometimes in cooperation with IAPF's SUI.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Akashinga ("The Brave Ones") female anti-poaching unit

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Founded in late 2017, these highly qualified female rangers patrol and work with local communities to catch poachers and eliminate wildlife trafficking and protect nature. Results always improving! :)

Conservation patrols: 2/3 regular, and 1/3 extended (3-5) day field patrols.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Akashinga ("The Brave Ones") female anti-poaching unit

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Program (and patrols) began in late 2017. Daily patrols are through villages and countryside, extended patrols go far into IAPF's patrol zone, approximately 230,000 acres.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of the International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF) is wildlife conservation through direct action.

IAPF protects endangered wildlife and ecosystems by conducting anti-poaching operations, delivering ranger training, supplying equipment and technological solutions, and providing critical project management and administrative support to local communities engaged in preventing poaching and parts trafficking.

Local empowerment and engagement play a critical role in reducing wildlife crime. IAPF’s community-focused operations are proving to be more effective and enduring than the highly militarized/adversarial anti-poaching tactics of the past. Our rangers are armed, and trained in military and policing skills, but they are also highly skilled communicators - and an active part of the communities in which they work. These communities are being given opportunities and incentives to “be the solution” — and they are responding magnificently.

Our Founder & CEO, Damien Mander, envisions a world in which conservation organizations like IAPF "put ourselves out of work." That is our ultimate goal.

IAPF has a structured approach to conservation, employing the tactics and technologies most relevant to defending wildlife within protected areas. But anti-poaching is only one part of our conservation solution.

Alongside partners who specialize in community engagement and development, research and development, wildlife rescue, and biodiversity management, IAPF deploys a number of programs in pursuit of our objectives.

Akashinga (“The Brave Ones”) - IAPF's All-Female Conservation Model

Innovative: IAPF’s Akashinga program is a new way of conducting conservation work. In an industry where men outnumber women on the frontlines by up to 100:1, a primary strategy of Akashinga is female empowerment. Professionally trained, fully qualified, and tough-as-nails: These disadvantaged women are given employment protecting the wildlife reserves in their own regions.

Along with protection for local ecosystems, this program benefits families and local economies…as community development and conservation are blended for the benefit of all species.

Effective: IAPF’s Akashinga program is a new, sustainable, and scalable model for large area conservation. It is working even as you read this.

In just the first nine months of frontline operations in Zimbabwe, the first Akashinga team has made over 100 arrests since going operational, shattering local ivory poaching syndicates and paving the way for the future of local families and nature. While trained in the use of weapons and ready to use them, we're proud no shots have been fired.

Community-based: Akashinga works WITH rather than AGAINST local populations by:
• Training and employment offered to local people
• Facilitating full financial participation of local women
• Supporting community development projects.

These are sound investments reaping long-term benefits for these communities — and for the protection of their surrounding ecosystems.

LEADRanger

We identified a need and the solution: The world keeps looking to expensive and sophisticated solutions for conservation challenges. But most often, the difference between the success and failure of a program is one good indigenous commander leading their rangers on the frontlines. This local leadership is the biggest gap in conservation.

The LEADRanger program re-builds management skills in the conservation industry by developing anti-poaching instructors and leaders who take the skills back to their home entities & train others. This “Train the Trainer” program provides unique experiences and “tools” for conservation law enforcement agencies to share across a growing number of countries.

Special Investigations (SI)

Targeting trafficking kingpins: A less discussed program, SI focuses on the wildlife supply chain in southern Africa rather than "just" the poachers on the ground. SI conducts cross-border wildlife crime information gathering with the intention of publishing or prosecuting crimes against wildlife and the key figures involved.

IAPF develops, implements, and manages:

* Anti-poaching ranger training

* Conservation security plans

* Anti-poaching operations

* Wildlife crime information systems

* Specialized, unique, and customized technology and systems for anti-poaching operations

* Field equipment procurement and logistics

We have a growing network of organizations, military and police veterans, national and regional conservation/law enforcement authorities, politicians, and others who are involved in and supportive of our important work.

Akashinga’s “boots on the ground” are female…and survivors. They’ve lived through tragic and devastating personal circumstances, and yet they choose to take up the cause of wildland conservation and endangered species protection. We’re giving them a continuing opportunity for fiscal independence, and they’re making some wonderful choices with their earnings. They are tough, trained, and tenacious – but they are also community members and they live alongside the areas they’re protecting. The wages they earn help support local businesses, schools, markets, community projects, and more. Our program has more than offset any minor economic loss created when the trophy hunters left. In fact, Akashinga invests more into the local community each month than trophy hunters did each year.

Additional community benefits include 47 jobs and households with good wages; 282 people are directly benefiting from Akashinga – including 141 school aged children. And these are just the direct impacts. Our rangers also get healthcare, legal support, education, learn to drive (NOT a given for anyone, especially women, in Zimbabwe), and some are buying houses!

Our work also creates goodwill with local people, national and regional authorities, farmers, and just about anyone we encounter. Because of the results we’re creating, we’re earning respect - and we leverage that respect to further the work we are doing. For example, we can’t share the details, but we recently got a letter of endorsement from a Zimbabwean federal entity thanking us for our work and endorsing our ongoing efforts.

We are empowering women, stabilizing communities, and growing networks of caring people while accomplishing our primary objective: The protection of nature. While such statements offer a warm feeling, we have performance metrics proving that our pride in our teams is justified.

Let’s examine the impact we’ve had on poaching in the Lower Zambezi:

2016: 70+ elephants killed (5.8 per month)

2017: 28 elephants killed; this is a 60% decrease from 2016 (IAPF began regional patrols/training/etc.)

2018: 18 elephants killed.

2019: 17 elephants killed; a 76% reduction from 2016.

2020: 12 elephants killed; an 88% reduction from 2016, and an especially difficult on given the impact of COVID-19 on our field operations.

Akashinga is holistic, sustainable, and scalable for large area wildlife conservation. And most importantly, it’s working!In the first 12 months of operation, these brave women have conducted in excess of 413 daily patrols, 210 extended (3-5 day) field patrols, 960 community patrols, and their mere presence has prevented uncountable poaching and trafficking activities. Patrols and arrests have, of course, continued to gain momentum since then. Also of note: When Akashinga began patrolling, wildlife was seen as infrequently as once a week. They now see the animals they are protecting on almost every patrol!

We already are expanding, and need only more resources to continue.

Financials

International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF)
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF)

Board of directors
as of 06/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Damien Mander

International Anti-Poaching Foundation

Term: 2014 -


Board co-chair

Mr. Ian Mackenzie-Ross

International Anti-Poaching Foundation USA

Term: 2014 -

Damien Mander

International Anti-Poaching Foundation (Global)

Ian Mackenzie-Ross

International Anti-Poaching Foundation (Australia)

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data