PLATINUM2024

The Priority Center

Ending the Cycle of Generational Trauma

aka The Orange County Child Abuse Prevention Center   |   Santa Ana, CA   |  http://www.theprioritycenter.org

Mission

Our mission is to deliver life-changing programs to assist people in crisis by giving them the tools and support necessary to end the generational cycle of trauma. This includes the prevention of child abuse and neglect through early intervention and mental health services.

Ruling year info

1990

Chief Execuitve Officer/ Executive Director

Ms. Lisa Fujimoto

Main address

1940 E Deere Avenue Suite 100

Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Child Abuse Prevention Center

EIN

33-0013237

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Orange County CA officials have received reports of child abuse involving over 50,000 children in the past year. The Priority Center works to reduce incidences of abuse through in-home and outreach services that interrupt the cycle of violence. Our vision is to end child abuse in Orange County by 2030.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Services for Families with Young Children

Services for Families with Young Children (SFYC) is a three-six month program for parents/guardians with young children based at the The Priority Center. The Priority Center works with families helping to support them in fostering a safe and nurturing home environment for children. The SFYC program assists families in Orange County with children ages 0-8, in reducing barriers to medical care and early childhood mental health services in order to provide them with the healthiest start in life.

This program focuses on identifying developmental delays and behavioral issues at the earliest age possible and then links families to appropriate services and support. Our highly trained staff will screen your child in your home and work with your family to provide an individualized plan of services to meet any needs that are identified.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

CAST: Child Abuse Services Team opened in 1989 to “reduce the trauma for child victims during the investigation of their abuse.” Most of CAST’s clients are victims of sexual abuse, and others have observed serious crimes, such as domestic violence, homicide, kidnapping and human trafficking.

CAST is a multidisciplinary, public/private collaboration of social workers, medical doctors and a nurse practitioner, a deputy district attorney, and therapists as well as Child Advocates from The Priority Center and a representative from Victim Witness. Children are brought to CAST from all 23 law enforcement agencies in Orange County for forensic interviews, medical exams, and/or crisis intervention therapy. At present, there are 55 to 60 volunteer Child Advocates.

In addition to recruiting, selecting, training and supervising Child Advocates, the CAST staff is also responsible for generating everything needed to care for children in the CAST playroom including toys, stuffed animals, snacks and lunches and other special items needed by the team as a whole, in addition to relating with donors on a regular basis.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims of crime and abuse

We serve suicidal and homicidal adults who can’t be hospitalized, in order to diffuse the crisis, promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent suicidal and homicidal acts. This program has a field-based treatment team consisting of clinicians, case managers and peer mentors. The program is a three-phase model:
1) Assessment of the client and support network to identify short-term needs and de-escalation
2) Individual and family therapy, outreach, peer mentor, and case management services
3) Preparation of a client and family support network for progression towards long-term resolution and treatment

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Infant In-Home Visitation serves high-risk families with an infant up to 17 months old that could benefit from a program that includes parent education and linkages to community resources. Program caseworkers provide services to client families every two weeks. Services are offered in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Caseworkers provide developmental screenings and educate parents about home and car safety, breastfeeding, nutrition, immunizations, healthy development, effective play activities, postpartum depression, oral health, and early literacy. The ultimate goal of the program is to enhance bonding and attachment between parents and their children.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families

Our Basic Needs program provides critically-needed household items to Orange County families. It is our aim to provide the necessary items required by the Orange County Social Services Agency to allow a child to be placed with relatives and extended family members. The ability to obtain items such as dressers, linens, strollers, dining sets, small kitchen appliances, and household items are crucial in this process.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Children and youth
Caregivers

We serve suicidal and homicidal children who can’t be hospitalized, in order to diffuse the crisis, promote a healthy family, prevent suicide, and keep the family unit together. The children served in the program are typically between 5-18 years of age, and are referred to us through the County Contract of a Mental Health Program. Program requirements are that a child is experiencing a mental health crisis. This could mean a child has had active suicide attempts, suicidal thoughts and plans, or self harming behavior. It could also mean a child has active homicidal ideation/plans and assaultive behavior. Most youths in this situation also exhibit self-medicating behavior. The program provides field-based crisis services that include short-term in-home therapy (individual and group), case management, and mental health rehabilitation, with a focus on maintaining family stabilization and preventing hospitalization.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The Cal WORKS HVP program is derived from CalWORKS and provides resilient parenting and early learning connection services, including a minimum of monthly home visits for up to twenty-four months to families approved for participation by the Orange County Social Services Agency (SSA). The purpose of the program is to provide a voluntary, high-quality, home visiting service to support positive health, development and well-being outcomes for pregnant and parenting women, families, and infants born into poverty.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The Connected Care program was created in 2019 to meet the growing need of clients who would exit the Children’s and Adult In-Home Crisis Programs funded through County Contracts but were in those programs for 3 weeks and were struggling upon exit. This program is 100% privately funded as a pilot program to reduce re-entry into the crisis programs, and to provide a handrail of support for 12 additional months. Supportive services along with resource linkages are readily available for all exited clients of The Priority Center’s past Crisis Programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of outreach events hosted by The Priority Center

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants, Children and youth, LGBTQ people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Outreach events include door-to-door and street outreach, as well as educational workshops. The year represents the fiscal year (July-June). The increase from 2019 to 2020 was impacted by COVID-19.

Number of parenting sessions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Services for Families with Young Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Staff teaches parents positive parent techniques to promote child development. 2019 covers Oct. 2018-Jun. 2019 (because the program entered a new contract).

Number of parents served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Services for Families with Young Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The number of parents enrolled in the program. 2019 covers Oct. 2018-Jun. 2019 (because the program entered a new contract).

Number of non-emergent requests completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Non-emergent requests are requests for items that families do not have, but may not be necessities, such as furniture or baby monitors. The year is the fiscal year (July-June).

Number of home visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Infant In-Home Visitation Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Staff provides home safety checks, community resources, and education on topics such as childproofing, nutrition, oral health, financial literacy, and child development. The year is the fiscal year.

Percent of parents who reported that the program was very helpful

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This percentage is based on the responses from the programs satisfaction surveys. The year is the fiscal year (July-June).

Number of referrals received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Children’s In-Home Crisis Stabilization Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of referrals the program received for children who have experienced a mental health crisis. This displays the need for the program. The year is the fiscal year (July-June).

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Children’s In-Home Crisis Stabilization Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The program's three strategic goals are: (1) enhancing healthy parenting styles; (2) increasing family self-sufficiency; and (3) ensuring that children and families are living in violence-free homes. To ensure goals are met, programs and services are implemented utilizing three primary measurable outcomes:

• Increase in health and safety of children and families
• Increase in the bond between parents and their children
• Increase in parent knowledge of healthy parenting practices

IN-HOME FAMILY SERVICES
Summary: The Priority Center has been providing Orange County’s families with in-home services for the past 35 years. By bringing services directly to our client’s home and gaining their trust, our professionals can provide detailed attention and a customized approach to prevent violence in the home. This in-home approach, once considered innovative, is now best practice for preventing child abuse and neglect. The Priority Center has eight (8) programs which use the in-home service delivery model to support stable families and prevent violence in the home:
1. Infant Home Visitation
2. Toddler Home Visitation Provides in-home development screenings and assessments, parenting education, and successful linkages to community resources for children ages 0-5 years. Annually serves over 860 families consisting of approximately 1,800 children and 1,500 parents.
3. Children's In-Home Crisis Stabilization Provides in-home suicide prevention and mental health services for children/teens up to 18 years of age who are at-risk of hospitalization due to severe mental health/behavioral challenges, suicidal ideation, etc. Annually serves over 440 families consisting of approximately 650 children in crisis and 900 parents.
4. Adult In-home crisis Stabilization Provides in-home suicide prevention and mental health services for those 18+ who are at risk of hospitalization due to severe mental health/behavioral challenges, suicidal ideation, etc. This is a new program with a goal of serving 350 adults in the first implementation year.
5. Basic Needs Provides/delivers essential items for home safety and care for families welcoming, fostering, or reunifying with children. Annually serves over 1,000 families, providing over 9,000 basic needs items.
6. School Readiness Provides comprehensive in-home school readiness services, including child development screenings, referrals, and linkages for families with toddlers, children, and youth ages 0-18 years. Annually serves over 470 children and 789 parents, providing over 800 parenting education sessions and 1,700 case management sessions.
SAFE AND CARING SITES FOR CRITICAL SERVICES
7. Child Abuse Services Team Reduces the trauma of child abuse investigations on children/teens by providing a safe, one-stop facility where all aspects of an investigation (e.g., forensic review, medical exam, trauma therapy) can be easily accessed. Annually serves 400 children and teens.
OUTREACH AND ENGAGEMENT
8. Outreach and Engagement Program Provides community outreach to create awareness and provide referrals to families. Annually makes over 50,000 contacts, providing over 3,500 confirmed linkages.

A highly skilled and well managed staff of mental health, social work and communications professionals reaches out to families in crisis and provides support to begin families along a path towards stability and success.

Many thousands of children and families have been assisted in the past three decades of operation. The need is to expand services to touch even more families, to be involved with families over a longer term, and to have capacity to follow up with families to determine their progress.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

The Priority Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Priority Center

Board of directors
as of 03/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Colleen Rogers

Keller Williams

Term: 2023 - 2025


Board co-chair

Mr. Paul Godby

The Capital Group Companies

Term: 2023 - 2025

Roger Armstrong

Armstrong/Robitaille/Riegle

Debashis Chowdhury

Canterbury Consulting

Thomas Manakides

Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher

Athena Wong

Agility Fuel Solutions

Donald Kennedy

First American Title Corp.

Marc Reich

Reich Radcliffe & Hoover LLP

Ed Inal

Aivita Biomedical

Hogiadi Kurniawan

Haskell & White LLP

Vanessa Dixon

CA State Univ., Long Beach

Catherine Sorensen

Community Leader/Philanthropist

Richard Swinney

Retired Attorney/Community Leader

Madison Spach

Spach, Capaldi & Waggalman

Alex Musetti

Hughes Marino

Gregory Washer

Entrepreneur

Jeremy Webb

Webb's Grainworks

John Hoefer

Milestone Risk Management

Kimberly Valley

American Business Bank

Mark Clews

Ankura

Tim DaRosa

Airkit, Inc.

Susan Crockett

Crockett & Crockett

Andrew Phillips

Phillips Group, Inc.

Casey Roberts

Cisco Systems, Inc.

Frederique Georges

FGPG Production Group

Rachel Ng

Capital Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/27/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability