Court Appointed Special Advocates of Orange County

Change a child's story

aka CASA OC   |   Santa Ana, CA   |  www.casaoc.org

Mission

CASA provides a powerful voice and a meaningful connection for children who have experienced abuse, neglect and abandonment. We work to ensure that these youth are safe, have a permanent home and an opportunity to thrive.

Ruling year info

1985

CEO

Mrs. Regan Phillips

Main address

1505 E 17th Street Suite #214

Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0069334

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

Children's Rights (R28)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CASA provides a powerful voice and a meaningful connection for children who have experienced abuse, neglect and abandonment. We are a privately-funded non-profit organization that serves children in the foster care system through the recruitment, training, and continued support of volunteers who advocate and mentor these children, representing their best interest in the courtroom and other settings. Currently, there are over 3,100 children in the foster care system in Orange County and over 2,400 of them have been removed from their parents’ care to reside with relatives, foster parents, or in group homes. We believe that the protection of our children is a fundamental obligation of our society and therefore our advocates and staff will fight for and protect a child’s right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect and to live in a healthy environment where he/she can learn and grow.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mentor-Advocate Program

CASA remains focused on serving our at-risk youth through the Mentor-Advocate Program. Each Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer completes 30-hours of court-mandated training, undergoes an extensive background check and makes a two year commitment to spend 10-15 hours per month with their assigned child. Advocacy areas include education, mental health, and independent living skills development.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The CASA Family Connections Program was created to identify and engage family members in the lives of CASA youth in the foster care system. Our program focuses on youth who have few or no relationships with their extended family members. There is compelling evidence that children who have connections to their family and other relations have improved behavior, improved school performance, healthier relationships, that they will extend to their future families and more hopefulness in their lives. Our goal is to provide permanency by connecting these youth with as many healthy and appropriate family members – relatives and non-relatives – as possible.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentor-Advocate Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentor-Advocate Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of waitlist cases

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentor-Advocate Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of Court Reports submitted by CASAs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Mentor-Advocate Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CASA of Orange County’s vision is that every child in foster care has an advocate they can depend on to help them reach their fullest potential..

CASA OC’s goal is to see the following outcomes for every youth served:

1) Monitoring child safety and decreasing probability of experiencing or committing future abuse
2) Increased preparation for and interest in post secondary education or career training and self-sufficiency, resulting in a decreased need for future public support and services
3) Lowered prevalence of school drop-out and higher graduation rates
4) Improved behavior, character development and educational performance
5) Increased self-esteem and goals for the future

We currently have over 150 youth on our waitlist waiting to be matched with a CASA volunteer, but we do not yet have the volunteers ready to serve them. With the dedicated funding, we have been able to invest more in recruitment and have seen an increase in the number of volunteers attending our training classes.

As we have seen success with our refreshed recruitment efforts, our plan is to continue with these efforts until we have the need to increase our staff, allowing us to supervise more volunteers, in turn, allowing us to serve more of Orange County’s foster youth.

CASA OC currently has 559 active volunteers available to provide advocacy services to youth in Orange County’s foster care system. Our volunteers on average, provide 1.75 hours of service per week, or seven hours per month, to dependent youth. Each volunteer is supervised either by one of our Case Supervisors (able to serve up to 40 volunteer/foster youth pairs), or one of our Assistant Program Managers (able to serve up to 10 volunteer/foster youth pairs).

In order to increase the volunteers coming into our program, which would cause us to increase our supervisory capacity, we have been amplifying our outreach and recruitment efforts. CASA OC has received specialty funding, dedicated to growing the number of volunteer advocates, in order to allow us to serve more foster youth.

Over the past 35 years, CASA OC has trained more than 3,250 volunteers who have given over 1,625,000 hours to helping 6,400 foster youth in Orange County.

In our 2019 fiscal year, 708 volunteers provided mentoring and advocacy to 709 of Orange County’s most at-risk foster youth, with the following results: 81% of our graduation-age youth either graduated high school, or they received a certificate of completion. Of the remaining 19%, 16% of youth are hopeful to earn their diploma by the end of 2020; CASA-OC has our staff Case Supervisors fill out an outcomes survey on a semi-annual basis. Our most recent outcomes survey showed a great deal of improvement in the lives of the youth that we serve. Of those children who exhibited a change, 71% showed improved behavior in their homes, 69% displayed positive behavioral modifications in school and 76% expressed increased motivation and plans for the future.

CASA-OC’s goal is to increase our numbers served to 800 annually in our 2020 fiscal year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Orange County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Orange County

Board of directors
as of 4/4/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Patty Juarez

Wells Fargo

Term: 2020 - 2022

David Fisher

PIMCO

Mark Kerslake

Province Group/Newport Equities, LLC

John Sabourin

Tenant Guardian

Michael Wong

Genea

Mark Foster

Snell & Wilmer, LLP

Jenny Gross

Community Philanthropist

Courtney Wittkop

Community Philanthropist

Todd Smith

Umberg Zipser, LLP

Gail Andler

JAMS Neutral

Bobbie Howe

BKH Design Group, LLC

Colin Israel

Black Inc, LLC

Carol Moore

Hyundai Capital America

Todd Vande Hei

Stark

Karen Jordan

Community Philanthropist

Lindsey Poker

U.S. Bank National Association

Anar Patel

Capital Group Companies

Colleen Masterson

Friends of CASA

Jim Chergey

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Lucy Donahue

By Light

Jay Nugent

Newmark Knight Frank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data