PLATINUM2024

Laurel House, Inc.

Preventing teen homelessness, one life at a time.

aka Hope Harbor   |   Tustin, CA   |  http://www.hopeharbor.org

Mission

Providing a home for teens in crisis, transforming lives, and strengthening families.

Ruling year info

1985

President

Dr. Jim Palmer

Main address

1 Hope Drive

Tustin, CA 92782 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0098433

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There is a pressing need for shelter programs for at-risk youth in California. More than 24,600 school-aged children are considered homeless or living in unstable housing arrangements. The National Runaway Safeline shared that amongst runaway teens, 47% experience conflicts with parents or guardians at home, 34% experience sexual abuse (80% of which are girls), and 43% report physical abuse. Sadly, many teens cannot return home since the problems that caused them to leave are still present. Even though there are so many teens in need of safe shelter, there were only 40 youth beds in Orange County. Hope Harbor has 12 youth shelter beds and access to mental health care for homeless and at-risk teens. Hope Harbor not only provides a safe haven for at-risk teens to call home, but we also equip them with the tools and support needed to graduate from high school, advance to college, and develop independent living skills to thrive in life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Hope Harbor, formerly known as Laurel House, is a life-changing, long-term, preventative care program for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teen boys and girls. Hope Harbor meets a very specific need in Orange County as the only youth shelter providing long-term care (12-18 months). With live-in house parents, rather than a shift rotation of staff, Hope Harbor empowers at-risk teens with a nurturing environment, the investment of time, and mental health support to address the deeper-rooted issues behind their initial state of crisis. Our overall goal is to prevent teen homelessness by reunifying at-risk teens with their families or transitioning them into positive living situations.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of students achieve a 90% or higher school attendance rate.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys

Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of high school seniors who graduate from high school on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys

Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

No seniors in Hope Harbor 2022 or 2023

Number of children exceeding 80% school attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys

Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of grants and research funding awarded to the institution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys

Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home for at-risk, runaway, or homeless teenage girls and boys

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By providing both long-term shelter and mental health care, the goal is to prevent homelessness for at-risk teens by reunifying them with their families or transitioning them into positive living situations. Our mission is providing a home for teens in crisis, transforming lives, and strengthening families. As a crisis intervention program, we focus on keeping the family unit intact without requiring the involvement of a public agency, such as social services. An average of 90% of the teens successfully transition back home with their families, and 10% are referred to a higher level of care when necessary.

In addition to basic necessities, the teen girls and boys receive: individual and family counseling, mental health care treatment and referrals, academic support, drug and alcohol prevention education, and live-in case management rather than a rotation of staff. The teens also complete daily chores, volunteer, and are given life enrichment opportunities focused on college readiness and independent living skills. Counseling and mental health care are essential to resolving the deeper rooted issues behind why teens become homeless, enter a life of substance abuse, or become victims of human trafficking or gang involvement.

Since 1985, Hope Harbor (formerly known as Laurel House) has filled a gap in services as the only long-term, preventative care program for at-risk, runaway, and homeless teens. Hope Harbor is also the only program providing accessible case management with live-in house parents, rather than employing a rotation of staff. As the needs of the homeless grew and evolved within the community, Hope Harbor expanded to create a second home for teenage boys.

Donna Giddings, the House Parent for the past 27 years, lives at the Hope Harbor Girls Home with her husband, Steve, who works for the city of Tustin. As the county Licensed Administrator of both homes, Donna manages a schedule for the teen girls and provides live-in case management. In case management meetings, the teens create and track personal goals. These goals include maintaining sobriety, improving time management skills, expressing emotions in a healthy way, resolving family conflict, and adopting healthy coping mechanisms. Once the teens complete their case management plan, they will transition back home with their families or into another positive living situation.

Brandon Towns is the House Parent for Hope Harbor Rip Tide and lives at the Boys Home with his wife, Jewel. Brandon manages the schedule for the teen boys and provides individual and family counseling once a week, academic tutoring, home-cooked meals, and creates an atmosphere where they can grow, make mistakes, and learn from them in a safe environment. Serving teen boys may seem insurmountable, but Brandon is able to teach the boys to be steadfast, even in times of peer pressure and temptation.

Margie Diaz, LCSW has been the Hope Harbor licensed therapist since 2000, providing individual and/or family counseling to our at-risk teens and their families. She also provides mental health diagnoses, referrals to psychiatric care, and treatment of present mental, social or emotional issues. Margie has extensive training in Chemical Dependency, Child Abuse and Neglect, Case Management, Crisis Intervention, and Suicide/Homicide Risk Assessment. She has over 25 years of experience in a variety of settings working with youth and their families in Orange County and is the Executive Director of California Youth Services.
Derrick Burton oversees Hope Harbor as the Program Director. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Biblical Addictions Counseling has earned certifications as a Masters Level Registered Addictions Specialist (M-RAS), Masters level Drug, Alcohol and Addictions Counselor (MDAAC), AND Substance Use Disorder Certified Counselor III- Clinical Supervisor, (SUDCC III-CS).

Since 1985, Hope Harbor (formerly knowns as Laurel House) has helped prevent hundreds of teen girls from becoming homeless in Orange County. Last year, Hope Harbor has kept 13 girls and 12 boys from being homeless and provided family reunification and counseling services to 60 additional family members. We have provided more than 2,834 shelter bed nights, 568 case management sessions, 8,565 home-cooked meals, and 2,946 rides to school, volunteer opportunities, and activities. We also provided quality mental health care, which included more than 596 life-skills training sessions, and 822 individual and family counseling sessions.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Laurel House, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Laurel House, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/02/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Bart Hansen

Ransomed Heart Ministries

Term: 2014 - 2025

Bart Hansen

Ransomed Heart Ministries

Mark Conzelman

NIEUPOINTE Enterprises

Chris Ferebee

Yates & Yates, LLP

Steven Callahan

Orange County Rescue Mission Health Care Services

Ralph Duff

Consultant

William Guard

Dentist

Jackie Nowlin

Community Volunteer

Joe Oltmans

Oltmans Construction Company

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/18/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data