PLATINUM2022

SPAY-NEUTER ACTION PROJECT

aka SNAP   |   Encinitas, CA   |  https://www.snap-sandiego.org

Mission

"SNAP's mission is to save lives by reducing pet overpopulation.”

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Mrs. Dorell Phillips Sackett

Main address

Post Office Box 235287

Encinitas, CA 92023 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0517862

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our primary demographic of underserved communities has a history of chronic pet overpopulation, due to a lack of resources needed to prevent, or stop, the cycle of pet overpopulation, including, low-cost veterinarians, community pet care programs, and pet education. Consequently, these areas have the highest population of animals entering the shelter system as supported by the San Diego Department of Animal Services, San Diego Humane Society, and Chula Vista Animal Care Facility. Our affordable mobile and stationary spay-neuter clinics provide much needed veterinary care without financial burden to reduce the birthrate of unwanted (and needless) litters, both humanely and effectively.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Neuter Scooter Affordable Spay & Neuter Program

We operate two surgical units. The original Neuter Scooter functions as a stationary clinic in East County on land donated in El Cajon. The new Neuter Scooter functions as a mobile clinic serving Escondido, Fallbrook, Oceanside, Ramona, Sovereign Nations, Valley Center, and the house rabbit community. Our spay-neuter services offered at deeply discounted rates are underwritten by donors. We charge $20 to $100 per procedure, depending on species, weight, and gender. The fee includes basic pet care services that would normally be up charged by other providers. We hold an average of 20 clinics each month for dogs and cats, at a ratio of 45 percent dogs and 55 percent cats, and accept three feral cats in regulation traps per clinic. Surgeries are performed by California state licensed veterinarians inside the surgical units, with support from registered veterinary technicians. An average of 5,500 pets are sterilized annually for an estimated 4,900 clients (some with multiple pets).

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Promoting responsible pet ownership is a key component of our work. We visit Title 1 schools, summer camps, and after school programs to inspire compassion for animals and instruct how to best care for them. The workshops include Proper Pet Care for grades K-5, Dog Bite Prevention for grades 2-8, and Puppy Mills for grades 6-12. We also partner with middle and high school animal care clubs to hold clinics on school grounds. We reach an estimated 3,000 students each year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Our participation in major community events and smaller civic activities throughout the year, gives us unlimited opportunity to interact with the public. We ask about pets in the home, distribute pet education materials, answer general pet health questions, and gather contact information for follow up. Friends of SNAP, a self-funded rescue and rehome entity for small dogs, may share a booth to promote adoptable dogs and the benefits of spaying and neutering. An estimated 1,000 people stop by our various outreach booths during the year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, Adults

Related Program

Neuter Scooter Affordable Spay & Neuter Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An average of 500 combined cats/dogs are altered per month, to yield an average of 5,500 altered per year. We serve as estimated 4,900 low-income pet owners annually, some with multiple pets.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Friends of SNAP is a separate, self-funded entity that rescues and rehomes small dogs. They serve as Ambassadors at community events to promote spaying/neutering while also looking for forever homes.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to reduce the suffering brought on by pet overpopulation - including, the unfortunate use of euthanasia to manage space in local shelters. We hold an average of 20 clinics each month (stationary in East County + mobile in North County) to yield an average of 600 surgeries on dogs, cats, and rabbits. These procedures reduce the number of animals entering shelters, struggling to survive on the streets, or ending up in the hands of the wrong people. It also has public value by improving community health with less strays and decreasing reliance on taxpayer dollars used to support municipal shelter operations.

To reach our goal, our program was designed to incentivize pet owners with intact pets living in targeted areas to spay-neuter their pets with “cost” and “convenience” as the driving forces. We therefore provide access to highly skilled pet care without financial hardship to improve quality of life for dogs, cats, and rabbits, who would likely not receive any medical care in their lifetimes while simultaneously, reduce the pool of animals contributing to the problem of pet overpopulation. Our fees of $20 to $100 per procedure depending on species, weight, and gender, also includes a general health exam, nail trimming, flea/tick treatment, deworming, pain medication, rabies vaccination, recovery collars for dogs and female cats, and cardboard carriers for cats that need one. Loose teeth extractions and wound care are also available, when needed, and for a nominal fee, we neuter animals with cryptorchidism, repair simple hernias, and implant microchips. A one-year license is available for pets who qualify by zip code. We hold over 20 clinics each month, and pet owners along Interstate 8 can visit our stationary clinic in East County and pet owners in coastal and inland North County can visit one of numerous mobile clinic locations. The clinics are scheduled one month out to help pet owners who qualify for our low-cost spay-neuter clinics coordinate schedules on weekdays or weekends.

Our affordable spay-neuter program has been in operation just shy of 20 years. The program runs efficiently with two Neuter Scooter surgical units and two teams of high-volume spay-neuter surgeons (one east county, one north county) who are dedicated to eradicating pet overpopulation. We remain the only provider to serve these regions regularly. Operations expanded after a new Neuter Scooter was delivered in 2020, made possible by a matching capital grant from PetSmart Charities, and a successful capital campaign. Having two Neuter Scooters working in tandem allows us to reach more animals desperately in need of our services. We keep the community informed of our programs via social media and electronic newsletters and update our website with events and other current information. Our best form of advertising however is word-of-mouth by satisfied clients who share information on our services with friends, family, and neighbors.

Over 70,000 dogs, cats, and rabbits have been sterilized on the Neuter Scooters since 2003, when the affordable spay-neuter program was first implemented. We plan for a third Neuter Scooter in the future to dedicate services to central San Diego and the South Bay, who are currently served by the east county location. This will expand our reach even further to continue slowing the cycle of pet overpopulation in the region. Over the past few years we have added to our demographics and service ranges. We serve disadvantaged, homeless, military, senior, and tribal pet owners in both incorporated and unincorporated areas. PetSmart Charities granted a $90,000 grant to serve tribal communities in 2022 and 2023 to reduce stray populations common to reservations, and the Pet Lovers License Plate Program awarded a $36,000 grant to reduce intakes into the San Diego Department of Animal Services North County Campus.

(Strategies and Goals section updated 05 12 2022)

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

SPAY-NEUTER ACTION PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SPAY-NEUTER ACTION PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 01/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Gerry Boss

UCSD

Term: 2012 -

Gerry Boss, M.D.

Professor of Medicine, UCSD

Kristina Hancock, JD

Senior Counsel, Withers Bergman LLP

Cameron Rooke

Mercedes Benz Escondido (Sales) & Rooke Fiduciary Management (Manager)

Sid Shapiro

Certified Public Accountant, Self-employed

Ian Thompson

Retired Technology Executive

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes