International Orphan Care

Help Orphans be Productive and Educated

aka I.O.C.   |   Laguna Hills, CA   |  www.orphanproject.org

Mission

The creation of a wholesome family-like environment where the pain & anguish of Afghanistan's orphans can be exchanged for comfort & self-reliance. These children are precious and represent the future of Afghanistan.

Notes from the nonprofit

IOC's mission: To create a family-like environment where the pain and suffering of orphan children can be exchanged for HOPE: Help Orphans be Productive & Educated Our future goals are: Educate more children Expand vocational classes in each school Expand number of schools in Afghanistan Clinics: reinstate support for medical services and reach more people Provide lunch for students

Ruling year info

1993

Chairman

Mr. Michael Whipple

Chief Financial Officer

Mr. Tamim Atayee

Main address

PO Box 3397

Laguna Hills, CA 92654 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0547951

NTEE code info

Primary/Elementary Schools (B24)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The perennial problem of our small charity organization is establishing consistency. Consistency in funding our programs is always a challenge, which impacts cash flow and our ability to pay our staff. The overwhelming majority of our income is from individual donors, which can be unpredictable and variable over the course of the year. However, we strive to balance our the sources of income by becoming more diversified and committing more resources to other sources, e.g., grants, social media fundraisers, crowdfunding, among others.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Jalalabad School

The Jalalabad Orphan Center, known as the Mir Mohammad Youssof Vocational School, provides education, meals, medical assistance, clothing, vocational training, recreational activities, and guidance for orphaned children ages 5 to 13 years old.

It is located off the main Kabul-Jalalabad highway, and currently accomodates 230 children. The children attend classes in the morning or the afternoon, and live with their extended families. IOC provides financial assistance to these families so that the children may attend school rather than having to work.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since the Soviet invasion in 1979, the people of Afghanistan have endured lives filled with deprivation, brutality and anguish. An entire generation has lost their childhood. Over 1.5 million have lost one or both parents, and over 700,000 orphans are living in sub-poverty conditions. Further conflict in the 1990s exacerbated the suffering and despair of the populace, especially women and children.

International Orphan Care (IOC) provides education, healthcare, nutrition and vocational training so that these children will be healthy and productive members of their community. The mission of IOC is to provide the orphans of Afghanistan with HOPE (Help the Orphans be Productive and Educated). IOC also serves children of the poor, disabled, landless, dispossessed and marginalized.

Educating to orphans and socio-economically disadvantaged children has been IOC's most effective strategy in enabling children to make a better life for themselves and their family.

The IOC School is fighting statistics by giving opportunities for disadvantaged Afghan boys and girls, who are able to study safely in a classroom with modern computers, books, and desks. Through vocational training, the children learn to be independent and confident, which will encourage them to be contributive members of society. They also learn entrepreneurship as some enter the workforce right away as proficient tradesmen and tradeswomen. Math, English, and computer skills are invaluable classes that will help the students find white collar jobs, like a schoolteacher. Through employment, these disadvantaged children will be breaking status quo and increasing influence and social power in Afghanistan.

IOC has a school in Jalalabad since 1993. In 2005, IOC built a new school and since expanded it to accommodate as many as 300 students.

IOC has a staff of 20 to 25, including 15-20 teachers who are highly qualified and come to IOC on the recommendation of local and national government education and welfare agencies, as well locally experienced and established NGOs.

IOC has an all-volunteer unpaid Board of Directors based in the United States, who provide oversight, guidance and raise funds to support the Jalalabad School.

IOC has maintained the status quo with the curriculum. However, IOC has not been able to expand the curriculum and offer more classes because we have not been able to generate the additional financial support. Currently, classes are offered in the morning but not in the afternoon. IOC strives to expand classes to the afternoon.

Nourishment has been an important benefit to the children, which IOC had provided in the past. For many of the children, it was the only of the day. However, because of financial reasons, IOC temporarily suspended lunch at the school. It is a short term goal of IOC to reinstate the lunch program.

Routine maintenance of the school has kept it in good condition and provides for an conducive to learning. However, in 2015, an earthquake caused some damage, which does not endanger the students or staff. Unfortunately, IOC has not been able to raise the funds to repair to damages due to the earthquake.

Financials

International Orphan Care
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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International Orphan Care

Board of directors
as of 12/23/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Michael Whipple

Michael F Whipple Associates

Term: 2004 -

Abdullah Osman

Retired physician

Akeem Mostamandy

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

Tamim Atayee

Rivertech Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Central Asian
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/29/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.