Human Services

Griffin & Wong Institute for Education and Training

Strong Families, Thriving Children, Healthy Communities

aka Hannah's House San Diego

San Diego, CA

Mission

Griffin & Wong Institute for Education and Training, DBA Hannah's House, is a community-based 501(c) (3) non-profit organization founded in 1988. Hannah's House strengthens the San Diego community by building resilience and well-being in families experiencing breakup, ensuring their children have the opportunity to thrive and reach their full potential. We support families in their transition from one unhappy home to two happy homes by teaching parents to co-parent peacefully and minimize the conflict that causes harm to a child's social, emotional and cognitive development. Our innovative, personalized and proven approach to building strong families and thriving children creates a healthier San Diego for everyone.

Ruling Year

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Susan Griffin

Main Address

9455 Farnham Street #100

San Diego, CA 92123 USA

Keywords

Supervised Visitation Safe Exchange Divorce and Coparenting Coaching Family Therapy

EIN

33-0591445

 Number

3661134482

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Law, International Law, and Jurisprudence (V26)

Single Organization Support (R11)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Half of American’s children will witness the breakup of their parents’ marriage. Throughout San Diego County, many children are struggling because their parents are in conflict as a result of a divorce and separation. The Family Court system is adversarial, not collaborative, so these children are frequently immersed in family turmoil and crisis, for months and sometimes years. Children in the midst of this crisis rarely have a safe person they can turn to for assistance in coping with their feelings, managing anxieties and learning the skills they need to go back and forth between their parents’ houses. The toxic stress a child experiences, aka Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), during a high-conflict family breakup can change brain development and cause chronic health problems, both in childhood and later in adulthood. Our wrap-around family services are designed to prevent the long-term negative effects of ACEs, both for individuals/families and the community at large.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

3

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Supervised Visitation

Supervised Exchanges

Transitions Family Program

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of clients with active restraining orders against their co-parent.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Males,

Parents

Related program

Supervised Visitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context notes

In 2018, 92 of 234 new cases have active RO's. In 2017, 67 of 124 new cases have active RO's. In 2016, 64 of the 131 cases had active RO's. In 2011, 18 of the 52 cases had active restraining orders.

Average number of service recipients per month

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Parents

Related program

Transitions Family Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

For our Transitions Family program, the following data represents the total number of parents served per year.

Number of service recipients who have no past substance abuse

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Males,

Parents

Related program

Supervised Visitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, 177 out of 234 cases had no reported drug/alcohol abuse. In 2017, 77 cases out of 124 new cases had no reported use. In 2016, 75 cases out of 131 new cases reported no use.

Number of youth and families for whom the treatment and support plan is implemented as specified by the therapist

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

Parents

Related program

Transitions Family Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of supervised visitation provided

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years),

Families,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Supervised Visitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families who report that service and support staff/providers are available and capable of meeting family needs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Supervised Visitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

We conduct interviews, and administer questionnaires to a representative sample of our parents.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our goal is to create a more peaceful society one family at a time. Ensure that all children who experience family break-up have the foundation of a healthy, peaceful relationship with both parents. Prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), which impact the lifelong health of individuals and strengthens the community at large Prevent estrangement or alienation in parent-child relationships following the break-up of the family. Increase the use of cooperative co-parenting between parents who divorce/separate. Reduce family trauma during the break-up of the family. Prevent family abductions.

Create peaceful solutions to family conflict in a research-to-practice setting. Provide accessible and affordable wrap-around services to families in transition in a safe, secure and child-welcoming environment. Train and engage a highly trained professional staff (in particular, Family Court expertise), to deliver critical services designed to reduce the mental, behavioral and social problems that frequently arise during the difficult transition of family breakup.

Founded in 1988, Hannah's House is a an exceptional and respected community service organization providing powerful solutions to key issues facing children and families going through separation and breakup. Our goal is to build resilient families and ensure that children have the foundation of a healthy, safe relationship with each of their parents. In the past 32 years, we have served over 23,000 families and provided over 268,000 hours of warm, peaceful child-parent family time. We know that family functioning improves when all members of a family participate in multiple services and skill-building classes. We equip parents with the skills necessary to navigate and resolve the difficult issues that arise before, during and after family breakup. With no government funding for these families, Hannah’s House fills a critical gap in our Family Court system. We provide affordable services and research-to-practice programs that teach parents to co-parent peacefully and make the transition from one unhappy home to two happy homes. By preventing future mental, emotional and cognitive issues in children, we help to ease the economic and mental health toll on society and taxpayers. Hannah's House is a San Diego Live Well Partner, and has a working collaboration with the Global Supervised Visitation Network and the Price Philanthropies City Heights programs. We have received repeat financial support from multiple San Diego foundations to move toward our goal of a more integrated service delivery program for low income and very low income Family Court parents and their children. We anticipate that this support will continue and, in fact, expand in the coming years. Not only do we receive consistent financial contributions from local foundations but have groups dedicated to completing large volunteer projects in the facility.

The most important measure of improvement in Family Court families is their perceived level of stress on a day-to-day basis. We have standardized stress measures for children and for adults. We administer these stress measures each time a family member receives a service via the Safe Passage Project. We also administer a Family Questionnaire at the beginning and the end of participation in the Safe Passage Project, measuring the quality of family functioning. In addition, we measure progress by: - High employee satisfaction and low turnover - Financial stability

Here are some of the results and progress we have made with families over the past year: 91% of children served are reported to have improved self-esteem and coping skills 87% of our parents report a reduction in conflict 85% of adults served report a decrease in day-to-day stress experienced 78% of our parents report an improvement in co-parenting skills Financial stability continues to be our primary goal yet to be reached.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: case management notes, suggestion box/email, our website.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: our staff, our board, our funders.
What significant change resulted from feedback
We recently updated our payment process to be completely online through our website instead of in person or through the phone so our clients can pay any balances or their future visit ( visits need to be payed 72 hours in advance) with ease. To make a payment each client needs to make an account to then proceed to make a payment. Thanks to customer feed back we realized after making an account the payment page would still say the client needed to make an account even though they were logged in causing mass confusion to our client base. With the help of the clients we were able to fix that problem and have had a significant drop in problems with our website and client portal.

External Reviews

Awards

Barbara Christensen Heart of San Diego 2014

St. Germaine Children's Charity

Photos

Financials

Griffin & Wong Institute for Education and Training

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/18/2019

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person with a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

No data