PLATINUM2024

Accessity

Where access to capital and community meet.

San Diego, CA   |  https://www.accessity.org/

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Mission

Accessity’s mission is to open doors of financial opportunity to those historically with less access to capital and business support: entrepreneurs of color, women, immigrant, and low-to-moderate income entrepreneurs, so they can build a prosperous business and livelihood for themselves and their families, while also strengthening our communities.

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Mrs. Elizabeth Schott

Main address

404 Euclid Avenue Ste 271

San Diego, CA 92114 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0620415

NTEE code info

Management Services for Small Business/Entrepreneurs (S43)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many in Southern California still live in poverty. For small business owners, this means there is less income available to invest in a business and many are unable to build wealth and financial assets. A small business venture gives owners the opportunity to increase their financial security, boost their income and add flexibility to their work schedule. Accessity's transformational approach to helping small businesses creates positive social and economic change. In addition, without access to capital from banks, an increasing number of small businesses are turning to online lenders. Many who have borrowed from online lenders report to Accessity that confusing fees and rates led to high monthly payments and predatory debt cycles. Borrowers may lack financial literacy needed for success, and Accessity's program directly serves those negatively impacted by predatory financing products.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Microlending Program

Accessity provides business support and microloans ranging from $300 to $100,000 to startup and existing business owners in Southern California (San Diego, Los Angeles, Orange, Imperial, San Bernardino, and Riverside counties).

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Low-income people
Immigrants
Self-employed people

Where we work

Accreditations

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund of the U.S. Department of the Treasury - Community Development Entity Certification (Annual) 2014

Awards

Four Star Rating 2013

Charity Navigator

"Dealmaker of the Year" Award 2013

Point Loma Nazarene University

2013 Financial Services Champion of the Year Award 2013

Small Business Association

Problem Solver Award 2013

San Diego Entrepreneur Day

Advance! San Diego Fast Pitch Third Place Winner 2012

Social Venture Partners

Top 10 Microfinance Companies 2011

CNN Money

Outstanding Performance in Community Development Lending Award 2010

CA Economic Development Lending Initiative and CA Resources and Training

President's Small Business Award 2010

Urban League of San Diego

Elizabeth Schott - Financial Services Champion 2016

SBA

Advocacy Award 2017

SBA San Diego District Office

Javier Islas - CFO of the Year 2023

San Diego Business Journal

Robert Lopez - Financial Services Champion 2020

SBA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of loans issued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Women, Immigrants

Related Program

Microlending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Women, Immigrants

Related Program

Microlending Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Accessity has goals to continue as the leading mission-based lender in Southern California, improving its efficiency to increase the number of small business owners served with direct financing and business training. In addition, the organization's goals include increased work to track impact statistics, increasing efficiency through technology platforms, diversifying products to serve niche entrepreneurial markets, increasing grassroots marketing to underserved small business owners, and offering in-depth technical assistance to borrowers through unique partnerships.

Overall, Accessity seeks to attract and garner support for its programs by generating more public awareness surrounding local microfinance activities, while boosting donor confidence as the program expands to serve additional community members.

Accessing capital is one of the biggest obstacles faced by small business owners. Capital may be out of reach due to lack of or damaged credit histories, limited financial literacy, short operating histories, and language and cultural barriers. These issues can often be related to or compounded by the income level, ethnicity, race, and/or gender of the business owner, as these factors have historically been linked to lower rates of approval by traditional lenders. Accessity aims to address these gaps in access, and 89% of our active clients are low- to moderate-income, minority, or female business owners.

Accessity's program works with borrowers to deliver individualized creative solutions tailored to their needs and offers one-on-one assistance services to improve financial health and business acumen. With loans ranging from $300 to $100,000, Accessity provides business owners access to flexible loans to start or expand a business that is underserved by the traditional lending market.

Accessity has found that the most effective way to help borrowers develop their business skills, while mitigating losses, is to offer individualized training on an as-needed basis by our staff or partner organizations. Staff assesses the needs of each borrower and appropriately matches them with an opportunity to increase their knowledge. Accessity partners directly with the Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs), SCORE, and Women's Business Centers to connect small businesses with additional mentoring and coaching.

Our staff of approximately 35 come from diverse populations, therefore adding to the understanding of local community needs. Accessity's leadership team has over 80 years of aggregate relevant experience. Accessitys CEO, Elizabeth Schott, who has been with Accessity since 2004, has 20+ years of experience managing and executing on strategies for small businesses and nonprofits to meet their goals. Javier Islas has been with Accessity since 2010 as CFO, overseeing the organization's finance and accounting. Director of Strategic Initiatives Valery Belloso has been with Accessity since 2006 and is an expert in lending, education, and business development. Accessity's Chief Credit & Operating Officer, Robert Lopez, re-joined Accessity in July 2018 after previously working for the organization from 2008 to 2014 and is responsible for lending staff supervision and training, program development, underwriting, loan portfolio quality, compliance management, loss mitigation and recovery, and operational efficiency. Mar Diteos Rendon joined Accessity in 2022 as the Chief Business Development Officer. Mar works to identify and lead initiatives for the organizations growth/brand and oversees the organizations business development and marketing teams. Based in Los Angeles, Mar brings more than 15 years of experience focused on growth, strategy, finance, business development, and entrepreneurship.

Since its inception in 1994, Accessity has disbursed more than $81 million through more than 5,950 loans so that small businesses can start, maintain, and grow operations. To continue to serve more of Southern California's entrepreneurs, the organization developed a strategic set of directions focused on efficient growth to meet the continued demand for service. Accessity serves the Southern California region of Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego counties. Accessity has identified a pressing need for services in Southern California and will address this critical need by offering loans from $300 to $100,000 and business training for entrepreneurs. Through access to capital and ongoing education, business owners have the chance to build credit, boost household income, and make lasting economic contributions to their communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Accessity
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Accessity

Board of directors
as of 02/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gordon Boerner

U.S. Bank (Retired); Member, U.S. Bank San Diego Advisory Board

Term: 2022 - 2025

Gordon Boerner

U.S. Bank (Retired); Member, U.S. Bank San Diego Advisory Board

Sean Carpenter

Consultant

William Lynch

The William D. Lynch Foundation

Mark Emch

Previous Senior VP & CFO (Retired)

Stacey Kartchner

Klinedist PC

Gene Louie

Retired Finance Professional

Joon Han

Better San Diego

Stephen Friedman

Pacific Premier Bank

Victor Nava

Sun Community Federal Credit Union

Alex Rodriguez

Enterprise Bank & Trust

Victor A. Vilaplana

Practus, LLP

Lydia Huard

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage

Chikako Tyler

California & Bank Trust

Michael Fletcher

Vistage Worldwide, Inc.

Stacie East

Entomological Society of America

Carlos Muñoz

Axos Bank

Sandra Felegy

Comerica Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/16/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.