Animal related

PROFESSIONAL ANIMAL RETIREMENT CENTER

For the REST of their lives.

aka Black Pine Animal Sanctuary   |   Albion, IN   |  www.bpsanctuary.org

Mission

Black Pine Animal Sanctuary exists to provide refuge to displaced, captive-raised exotic animals for the rest of their lives, and to educate people about responsible animal care and conservation.

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Mrs. Lori Gagen

Main address

P.O. Box 02

Albion, IN 46701 USA

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Formerly known as

Black Pine, Inc.

Black Pine Animal Park

EIN

33-1020728

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are a number of issues associated with keeping non-domestic, aka "wild" animals in captivity. Most captive wild animals exist for the purpose of entertainment, to be exploited for money. Most suffer from lack of adequate space, nutrition, medical care, and freedoms of choice necessary to thrive. Many ultimately pose a serious threat to public safety, due to poor living conditions. For example, three adult tigers were surrendered to the sanctuary by a breeder and private owner of nearly 40 tigers. The wildcats lived in a back-yard cage complex that resembled a "puppy mill", under the care of an owner who was a convicted felon who was prohibited by law from owning a firearm. As cages fell into disrepair and the man was unwilling or unable to properly maintain the secure housing of dangerous animals, the federal government stepped in to shut down the complex. By that time, hundreds of wildcats has been produced and sold, bartered, and traded to exploiters across the nation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Field Trips

Supervised, educational field trips for K-12 feature sanctuary tours, personal animal biographies, bio-facts, and other activities aimed at meeting a variety of Indiana’s Academic Standards.

Population(s) Served
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Unpaid internships requiring a minimum of 400 hours of service are offered for college-enrolled students or graduates seeking careers in animal-related fields such as zoology, veterinary, wildlife management, ecology, etc.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
Budget
$8,000

Job Shadow opportunities are offered for individuals ages 12 and up to meet career planning class requirements for several area schools, colleges, and universities.  This program is also used to determine 'readiness' for application to the volunteer program for ages 16 and up.

Population(s) Served
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)
Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use
Budget
$0

Supervised educational sanctuary tours offer the opportunity to observe animal residents as informed guides share the stories of each animal's personal captive history and the events that led to them needing permanent refuge; visitors are informed of the challenges of the exotic pet trade, current state of laws and regulations (or lack of), dangers of owning non-domestic animals, and more.  Guests are required to abide by strict rules and expectations of respectful behavior to ensure the animals' comfort at all times.

Population(s) Served
General Public/Unspecified

The 'vocational' volunteer program is designed for high school students who qualify to spend a portion of their school day outside the classroom to learn a vocation in a supervised environment.  We mentor high school students interested in learning more about careers such as veterinary science, zookeeping, and other animal-related fields.

Population(s) Served
Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

As a member of the Big Cat Sanctuary Alliance, and a resource in our community, the sanctuary actively advocates for responsible animal care and public safety, and has endorsed legislative efforts as well as participated in the drafting of legislation.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Budget
$0

Where we work

Awards

Accredited Charity 2012

Better Business Bureau

Reader's Choice Awards Winner - multiple categories 2012

Fort Wayne Newsapapers

Top-Rated Charity 2012

GreatNonProfits.org

Top-Rated Green Charity 2012

GreatNonProfits.org

Top 10 Summer Gotta-Do's in Indiana 2012

Indiana Office of Tourism

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

We seek to ultimately raise public awareness and demand for better laws to protect the welfare of captive exotic animals. We advocate ourselves, and encourage citizens to advocate, to stop the use of animals in "entertainment"; to stop the exploitation of such animals purely for profit; to stop the captive breeding of such animals when done outside of a bonafide species conservation effort managed by scientists and biologists properly trained/educated and engaged in actual wildlife conservation efforts in native habitats. We strive to help eliminate the need for refuge for unwanted exotic animals bred and born in captivity, unsuitable for re-release into the wild, unsuitable for helping to save their wild counterparts through species survival efforts.

1. Advocate verbally to all who visit Black Pine.<br/>2. Advocate on social media to all who will follow us.<br/>3. Develop and publish literature for distribution to the public during outreach activities.<br/>4. Develop and host educational "camps" for children, to reach the next generation.<br/>5. Conduct educational guided sanctuary tours to reach a captive audience who have an interest/compassion for animals.

The sanctuary currently operates the refuge on an 18-acre plot of land, of which several acres remain undeveloped. Animal husbandry is overseen by a team of professionals who hold bachelor's degrees and have significant experience and training, and work under the leadership of a team of veterinarians. Well-established and proven volunteer and internship programs provide additional staff support. The sanctuary's Annual Fund, for general operating expenses, have historically been sustained through well-respected and unique educational programs for all ages, as well as annual events, membership program, and an on-site retail store. The sanctuary's leadership is made up of business professionals, legal counsel, and others in the community who are invested in carrying out the strategic plan and vision of the organization. The sanctuary is very well-respected, with local media support and trust as a local "expert" in animal welfare-related issues. Over 50,000 "fans" follow on Facebook.

We know we are making progress through the growing number of inquiries we receive from local citizens who consider us a source for information to help them make responsible, informed decisions.<br/><br/>We track all of our inquiries on a monthly basis. Likewise, we track program attendance, social media followers, subscribers, etc. We also track the number of animal adoption inquiries we receive.<br/><br/>We follow the laws, and take note of changes being made.

We have accomplished the goal of becoming an "expert" in our community for animal welfare for captive exotic animals kept outside of AZA-accredited zoological institutions. We have accomplished the goal of establishing our mission as different than that of an AZA-accredited zoological institution. The sanctuary is pending "Verification" with the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries. We are charter members of the Big Cat Sanctuary Alliance. We were leaders in an effort to draft a new local Animal Welfare Ordinance. We have provided permanent refuge to over 250 displaced, captive-raised exotic animals and educated more than 135 interns as well as nearly 1,000 volunteers.

Financials

PROFESSIONAL ANIMAL RETIREMENT CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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PROFESSIONAL ANIMAL RETIREMENT CENTER

Board of directors
as of 8/1/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Barb Smith

B. Smith Office Services

Term: 2018 -

Renee Runkle

Karen Hoag

Brenda Cureton

Kim Lauer

Ted Storer

Christine Meek

Cindy O'Brien

Phillip Tanner

Ted Kitsos

Kerri Garvin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

Wildlife sanctuary, rescue, refuge, preserve, big cats, wildcats, primates, reptiles, birds, wolves, bears, foxes, education, preservation, conservation