GOLD2021

211 San Diego

aka 211 San Diego   |   San Diego, CA   |  www.211sandiego.org

Mission

Our mission is to serve as a nexus to bring the community together to help people efficiently get appropriate services, and provide vital data and trend information for proactive community planning.

Ruling year info

2003

President & CEO

Mr. William York

Main address

PO Box 420039

San Diego, CA 92142 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

INFO LINE of San Diego County

EIN

33-1029843

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

211 Information & Referral Services

Established in 2003, 211 San Diego provides a free, 24-hour confidential countywide phone service and searchable online database of community and healthcare resources that have been vetted for quality and safety.

When people call 2-1-1, they talk with a trauma-informed trained community connector whose training promotes safety, self-care and resiliency. Callers may choose to answer comprehensive eligibility screening and assessment questions to construct a more detailed representation of their situations. Based on what they share they need, each caller can then choose to connect with available resources, and, with their permission, community connectors may communicate directly on their behalf with a non-profit, government or healthcare organization to ensure they secure access to the services they are seeking.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Social and economic status
Health
Work status and occupations
Family relationships

People using 211 San Diego’s Safety Net services may engage, retain, and enroll in different programs designed to reduce poverty. Clients learn about available public assistance benefits and apply over the phone for programs such as:

-CalFresh or SNAP (food),
-Medi-Cal (Medicaid) and Covered California (health insurance),
-Rental assistance,
-Utility bill payment assistance,
-California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) and Medical Baseline utility discount programs,
-Water bill payment assistance,
-Free tax preparation assistance and more.

By using this unique, phone-based, system, callers’ eliminate barriers to in-person enrollment, such as transportation, childcare or physical limitations. Clients may access these services simply by calling 2-1-1 or by visiting www.2enrollme.org to make an appointment.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations
Health

When veterans, active-duty servicemembers, reservists, national guardsmen, or their families call 2-1-1, they connect with a Courage to Call (C2C) peer specialist, who is also a veteran with lived military experience.

When working with C2C peer specialists, clients invest different amounts of time, ranging from one 15-minute call to ongoing follow ups over the short or long-term, to connect to available resources and enroll in the right programs. When clients permit, C2C peer specialists may communicate on their behalf with veteran, non-profit, government and healthcare organizations to ensure they make the connections they are seeking.

*Note: Courage to Call is funded by the County of San Diego and led by Mental Health Systems, Inc. in collaboration with 211 San Diego and Veterans Village of San Diego.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

People using Navigation services can work with Client Care Specialists over a short period of time to attain self-sufficiency, family wellness, manage or prevent chronic illness, and reduce utilization of hospitalizations or higher levels of care. Clients may:

-Receive coordinated health, housing, legal and other support
-Get connected to Managed Care Plans
-Enroll in public programs, including insurance
-Access prescription assistance
-Enhance health action plans set by medical providers
-Attain and sustain safe and stable housing
-Participate in health and wellness programs
-Obtain financial assistance
-Locate transportation options
-Receive support across all Social Determinants of Health

Some cases require a longer investment for more complex case management and coaching to abate health needs that require additional care coordination, advocacy, and support. At any given time, 15 to 20 clients may be working with each Client Care Specialist.

Population(s) Served
Health
Adults
Social and economic status
Family relationships
Work status and occupations

211 San Diego is the region’s 24-hour non-emergency information line. During or following a disaster, including public health emergencies, people may call 2-1-1 for critical information, such as road closures, evacuation routes, food assistance programs, shelters, testing/vaccination centers, and more.

Population(s) Served
Social and economic status
Adults
Family relationships
Health
Work status and occupations

Social factors significantly impact health outcomes and medical and other costs. 211 San Diego developed the Community Information Exchange (CIE), an ecosystem utilizing a cloud-based platform and a growing network of 100+ multidisciplinary service providers that securely share data to create a better experience for those seeking to address social and health-related needs. Clients who consent to share their information in the CIE may revoke their consent at any time.

The CIE uses a shared language, interoperable technology, integrated data from multiple sources, bi-directional referrals, and a longitudinal client record to deliver enhanced community care planning that promotes a proactive, holistic, person-centered system of care. This person-centered model collects shared outcome measurements that can inform innovative solutions through policy and systems change, and it has been replicated across the country. Communities exchange best practices at the annual CIE Summit.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Family relationships
Health
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations

Where we work

Accreditations

Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS) - 5 Year Accreditation 2019

Awards

Women Who Mean Business 2020

San Diego Business Journal

Women Who Mean Business 2016

San Diego Business Journal

Live Well Public Health Champion 2021

San Diego County

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Information and Referral Systems 2021

United Way Worldwide 2021

211 California 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

211 Information & Referral Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2017, we launched a new technology platform that reduced duplicated anonymous records. In 2020, we did not create records for every caller. Demand was too high to slow down with 1 million+ calls.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To share feedback with the broader system of care to remove access barriers, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

211 San Diego
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

211 San Diego

Board of directors
as of 06/29/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jeff Nichols

The Nichols Group

Term: 2021 - 2022

Dr. Clyde H. Beck Jr.

Henry Haimsohn

Jonathan Grissom

Higgs Fletcher & Mack LLP

Jeff Nichols

The Nichols Group

Dr. James Dunford

The McAlister Institute for Treatment and Education

Nancy Sasaki

United Way of San Diego County

Tana Lorah

Kaiser Permanente

Diana Puetz

San Diego Padres

Joel John Roberts

PATH

Jonathan Woldemariam

San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E)

Paul Johnson

MUFG Union Bank

Terri Colachis

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/25/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.