Human Services

PROVIDENCE HOUSE INC

Every child is your child.

Cleveland, OH   |  www.provhouse.org

Mission

Mission Statement:
Providence House protects at-risk children and supports families through crisis, strengthening communities to end child abuse and neglect.

Vision Statement:
Children everywhere are raised in safe, loving families free from abuse and neglect.

Ruling year info

1981

President and CEO

Ms. Natalie A. Leek

Main address

2050 W 32nd St

Cleveland, OH 44113 USA

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EIN

34-1336325

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Providence House Crisis Nursery Program

Our traditional Crisis Nursery offers emergency shelter and crisis care services for up to 20 children at a time.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
At-risk youth

Our Pediatric Crisis Nursery serves up to 10 children at a time who also have medical conditions.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
People with diseases and illnesses

Our Family Center hosts our family preservation services and includes areas for private onsite family visitation, parent education, case management, trauma services, and Aftercare support sessions.

Population(s) Served
Families
Caregivers

Our Emergency Placement Program, in partnership with the Cuyahoga County Division of Children and Family Services (DCFS), allows children in DCFS custody to benefit from the same shelter and care as children served through our traditional programming until a long-term placement can be identified.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
At-risk youth

Our Community Education and Resiliency Program brings our case management, parent education, trauma, and other prevention services to families in the community, giving them the tools to increase stability, build supportive relationships, and increase resiliency and parenting capacity.

Population(s) Served
Families
Caregivers

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Behavioral Health - 3 Year Accreditation 2016

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - 3 Year Re-Accreditation 2018

Awards

Champions in Action Award 2009

Charter One Bank

Respitography Award - Public Policy 2009

ARCH National Respite Network

Best Practice Documentary 2009

ARCH National Respite Network

Respite Design Award 2009

ARCH National Respite Network

Isaiah Award 2009

American Jewish Committee

Agency of the Year 2013

NASW OH- Region 3

ChampYNPN 2014

YNPN Cleveland

Promising Practice Award 2015

Ohio Attorney General

Drucker Prize for Innovation Semi-Finalist 2017

Drucker Institute

NPT's Best Nonprofits to Work For 2019 2019

Nonprofit Times

Innovative and Exemplary Respite Service 2019

ARCH National Respite Network

Children's Bureau Champion for Preventing Child Maltreatment 2019

United States Children's Bureau

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Caregivers,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal year is July 1-June 30, clients served includes children who stay at Providence House and families who received Family Center services and basic need items (2019 and onward).

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Caregivers,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fiscal year is July 1-June 30, shows number of inquiries received for admission to our West Side campus.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

At Providence House our primary goals are to:<br/>1. Protect Children - by providing for their physical, emotional, developmental, and educational needs<br/>2. Support Families - by connecting them to resources, cultivating nurturing practices, and encouraging responsibility <br/>3. Strengthen Communities - by advocating for underserved families and demonstrating the lasting impact or prevention

We Protect Children by providing for their physical, emotional, developmental, and educational needs o Offer free, voluntary (non-custodial) 24/7 emergency shelter to children, aged newborn through twelve years old, who are at risk of abuse and neglect o Provide each child in our care with evidence-based assessments, therapies, daily activities, and individual nurturing that supports their developmental, social-emotional, medical, and educational enrichment We Support Families through Crisis by connecting them to resources, cultivating nurturing practices, and encouraging responsibility o Offer unique, individualized parent education, mentoring, family preservation, and Aftercare services to support long-term family stability o Link families to community support services, treatments, and therapies focused on developing safe, stable caregivers in the home through intensive case management and counseling services o Certified Trauma Specialists provide interventions and therapies to address the long-term impacts of trauma on child development and family dynamics We Strengthen Communities by advocating for underserved families and demonstrating the lasting impact of prevention o Partner collaboratively with nearly 100 public and private service providers in wrap services to promote family stability o Conduct over 150 community outreach visits and speaking engagements this year to advocate for our families and the prevention of child maltreatment

Providence House is one of the nation's oldest operating crisis nurseries among the 70+ in operation in the United States and Canada today. With nearly 40 years of experience, we also support one of the longest lengths of stay among nurseries in the United States and the deepest levels of services beyond children’s emergency shelter, promoting family stability and preservation and preventing foster care placements. Locally, we are the only agency of our type and scope of services in the state of Ohio. Providence House is licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS) as a Crisis Care Facility and follows their guidelines to ensure that our facilities, policies, and practices provide each child with the individual adult attention, care, and nurturing that they need. We have been certified through ODJFS since 1990, operating under Ohio Administrative Code Rules: Chapter 5101:2-5 (Rules for Agencies) and Chapter 5101:2-9 (Rules for Residential Facilities). We meet or exceed requirements in all areas of our licensing regulations, policies, and direct care procedures. In March 2018, we were re-accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) in Congregate Care, Assessment and Referral: Mental Health, and Case Management/Services Coordination, Mental Health and received two new accreditations in Diversion and Intervention and Respite. In November 2017, we also became a Certified Community Mental Health Provider by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OMHAS) in Behavioral Health Counseling and Therapy, Mental Health Assessment, and Community Psychiatric Supportive Treatment. We recently became an Ohio Medicaid Behavioral Health Provider as well. In 2019, Providence House was recognized as an "innovative and Exemplary Respite Service" by the ARCH National Respite Network, a United States Children's Bureau Champion for Preventing Child Maltreatment, and one of the Nonprofit Times' Top 50 National Nonprofits to Work For. Additionally, Providence House has secured the highest ratings for nonprofit transparency and fiscal performance from GuideStar and Charity Navigator.

Providence House is an outcomes-focused, learning organization with a “data culture” that regularly assesses the effectiveness of our services through weekly staff/team meetings, board/committee meetings, family team meetings, and ongoing communication and collaboration with our referral agencies. We utilize a number of sophisticated, customized data tracking systems to capture service data and performance to stated outcomes goals, not only to report progress, but also monitor our quality of engagement and inform program design decisions. We also engage and welcome external evaluation and assessment of our program outcomes and have participated in two research initiatives with Case Western Reserve University to assess our long-term outcomes and improve our data collection processes to better evaluate our program performance. Our Social Workers and administrative staff use the following tools to measure our outcomes: • Intake and Discharge of Residential Care forms • Service data tracking in Access and Excel databases • Providence House Trauma Screening Checklist and Assessment • Daily care shift reports • Parent satisfaction and self-evaluation surveys • Pre-post survey of staff knowledge of trauma-informed care • Staff performance evaluations

Providence House has been funded primarily through philanthropy for 39 years and we charge no fees for the services we provide. We understand that this places us in a vulnerable position with regards to the ever-changing economy. However, as part of our “Vision 40” Strategic Plan, we have begun to expand, engage, and explore outside streams through which we can secure new additional revenue, such as per diem contracts with County agencies like the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board and DCFS, Medicaid reimbursement, earned income through community background check services, and the launch a fee-based digital consulting model to disseminate the Providence House Crisis Nursery program model throughout the United States. Other targeted revenue streams include launching a formal planned giving program, implementing a major donor strategy, new digital e-commerce tools, cause-related marketing with our Corporate Partners, and new state and federal government funding. In an effort to serve more children and families in crisis in the drastically underserved neighborhoods on Cleveland’s East Side, Providence House has also launched our Giving Hope for the PHuture Campaign. This involves the construction of a 20-bed Crisis Nursery and renovation of the historic Weizer building in the Buckeye/Shaker neighborhood to include a Children’s Education and Activity Center, a Family Resiliency Center, and our Administrative Headquarters. To date, Providence House has raised nearly $5,000,000 toward our $13 million campaign and expects that all areas of our new East Side campus will be open and operational by Spring of 2022.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), case management notes, through our website and social media outlets.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    -One of the mothers we recently served suggested that we make our communal spaces feel more home-like. As a result, we have rearranged the furniture in these spaces to reflect a layout similar to a typical living-/family-room. -When we started offering respite services, a parent suggested that we allow parents or guardians to be able to utilize respite and standard crisis services interchangeably. As a result, we now offer four opportunities for respite per year, which are considered separate from the allowable number of days a family may take advantage of our traditional crisis nursery services within one year.

Financials

PROVIDENCE HOUSE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

PROVIDENCE HOUSE INC

Board of directors
as of 5/5/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Jane Cronin

Sherwin Williams

Term: 2016 - 2019

Gareth Vaughan

The Albert M. Higley Company

Jeffrey Robinson

Grant Thornton LLP

Karen Dolan

Community Volunteer

Jane Cronin

The Sherwin-Williams Company

Timothy Flanagan

Benesch Friedlander Coplan & Aronoff

Gregory Rush

Cleveland Browns

Shelby Ball

KeyBank

Paul Kostyack

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Ryan McKean

Skylight Financial Group

Carol Moore

UnitedHealthcare Community Plan

Duane Bishop, Jr.

Forest City

Adam Jacobs

Oppenheimer & Co., Inc.

Karla Wludyga

PRADCO

John (Chaz) Weber

Tucker Ellis LLP

Charlene Coughlin

TWIST Creative

Rob DiGeronimo

Independence Excavating, Inc.

John Evans

Jones Day

Joseph Lukac

Ernst and Young

Tony Madalone

Fresh Brewed Tees

Tori Nook

Anchor Cleveland

Eileen Schreiber-Radis

Deloitte

Meri Armour

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Warren Blazy

Jones Lang LaSalle

Chris Conti

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Anna Kanaris

Moen

Tom Reddy

MCPc

Cristine Torek

CMT Consulting LTD

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/05/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/05/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.

Keywords

providence, providence house, Cleveland, Ohio, Cuyahoga County, crisis, nursery, shelter, child, abuse, neglect, maltreatment, foster care, alternative, differential, response, families, trauma