Emerald Development and Economic Network, Inc.

Housing is Our Foundation

aka EDEN   |   Cleveland, OH   |  https://www.edeninc.org/

Mission

EDEN's mission is to provide housing solutions to people facing the challenges of houisng insecurities and homelessness. Today, EDEN is a nationally recognized housing provider through our scattered site properties, Permanent Supportive Housing buildings and rental voucher programs. While EDEN focuses on such housing activities as development, location, housing stability, landlord relations, inspection, maintenance, and management, the agency also partners very closely with dozens of community-based agencies to ensure that tenants obtain the support services they need to improve their health and well-being, and sustain permanent housing. Housing is our foundation, and the linkage of housing and services is the key to the success of the clients we serve.

Ruling year info

1991

Principal Officer

Elaine Gimmel

Main address

7812 Madison Ave

Cleveland, OH 44102 USA

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EIN

34-1667990

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Housing Search Assistance (L30)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

EDEN develops, provides, operates, and advocates for safe, decent, affordable housing and support services for persons living with disabilities or special needs, who have low or no incomes, and may be experiencing homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Permanent Supportive Housing

Based on the Housing First philosophy that a permanent, safe place to live is a prerequisite to life goals such as recovery and employment, EDEN has partnered with various social service agencies to meet this need. We have 11 properties that contain efficiencies or 1 bedroom apartments available to chronically homeless, low income individuals (W/O dependents) who have a disability. Referrals must come from Coordinated Entry.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of households served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of customers reporting that the program they are assigned to is meeting their needs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Ex-offenders

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In response to the statement "I feel that the housing program I am assigned to is meeting my needs," 50.5 percent reported they strongly agree, 38.9 percent reported they agree, totaling 89.4 percent.

Number of homebuyers/tenants with low incomes receiving housing subsidies as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Ex-offenders

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children and youth who have received access to stable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Dropouts, Economically disadvantaged people, Ex-offenders

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

EDEN, Inc. will be a leader in efforts to end homelessness by:

Developing, operating, and administering safe, decent, affordable housing which will enable the community's most vulnerable individuals and families to live with hope and dignity.

Developing and maintaining collaborative partnerships that foster and increase resources to create initiatives and strategies in support of our mission.

Developing a culture which attracts and retains highly qualified and committed staff.

EDEN, Inc. is a nationally recognized housing provider, and employs multiple strategies to addressing homelessness in Northeast Ohio, including the following:

1. The development, ownership, and management of permanent supportive housing (PSH).
2. The ownership and management of scattered site properties (including residential care facilities, save havens, a recovery house, and an emergency shelter).
3. The administration of affordable housing programs.

EDEN also employs dedicated Housing Stability staff, and partners with dozens of community-based agencies to connect residents to clinical services, in order to support residents in sustaining their housing.

Overarching the above-listed strategies is a housing-first approach to addressing chronic homelessness, wherein lease compliance is the only condition of housing, and participation by residents in services is voluntary. When EDEN joined our partners in 2006 as one of the first coalitions championing the housing-first model, it was viewed as a revolutionary. Over a decade later, we continue to use this highly effective, compassionate, cost-effective model to support our community's most vulnerable members.

EDEN has been been developing our expertise as a leader in providing housing solutions in Northeast Ohio for almost thirty years. Commensurate with our expanding reach, we have grown our staff from three to 148 people. We also partner with dozens of local community-based agencies to leverage respective resources and proficiencies and optimize our impact.

Ending homelessness is not simply "wishful thinking" at EDEN. The organization draws over 28 years of experience, as well as local and national partnerships and expertise, to develop proven approaches with measurable benefits for our community. EDEN’s multi-pronged approach to providing a basic need—and a basic right—and improving the health and well-being of all people living in our community, is rooted in both heart-filled compassion, as well as hard-headed pragmatism. Since its founding, EDEN has developed a wealth of institutional knowledge about the opportunities and challenges of housing persons with disabilities. This has allowed EDEN to make an extraordinary impact throughout the region.

Since its inception in 1991, EDEN has accomplished the following:

- The development, ownership, and management of 11 permanent supportive housing (PSH) facilities, totaling 667 units, and the management of another two more PSH buildings, totaling 71 units.

- The ownership and management of over 70 scattered site properties, including 65 independent living properties (totaling over 200 units); five residential care facilities; two safe havens; one recovery house; and the Norma Herr Women's Center, an emergency shelter for women.

- The administration of 11 affordable housing programs, providing rental subsidies to approximately 3,000 households every month.

- The administration of supportive programs including housing stabilization, rapid re-housing, and more.

All told, EDEN serves over 4,000 households every year through our programs and services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People with housing insecurities, including those with mental illness and disabilities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are currently updating the website to make it more friendly and easier to find important information.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It makes them feel like they are important enough to listen to.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Emerald Development and Economic Network, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Emerald Development and Economic Network, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Mark Tichar

Oswald Companies

Term: 2021 - 2023

Douglas Shelby

Retired/HUD

Michele Sommerfelt

Retired/Educator

Mark Dodds

The Finch Group

John Mark Tichar

Oswald Companies

Joshua Levin

First Energy/Illuminating Company

Susan Licciardi

Newmark Knight Frank

Matthew Large

John G. Johnson Construction Co.

Kenneth Silliman

Retired/City of Cleveland

Amanda Miller

University Settlement

Timothy Williams

EDEN Consumer

Hal Gunder

MRI Software

Ed Chatmon

Greater Cleveland Partnership

Jonathan Petrus

Progressive Insurance

Beth Adams

Key Bank

Dennis Morton

HUD /FHA Consultant

Kanika Williams

Project Save

Maurice Agee

EDEN Consumer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/24/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.