ASIAS HOPE

Guiding God's people into courageous leadership on behalf of the world's most vulnerable children

Columbus, OH   |  www.asiashope.org

Mission

Asia's Hope is a multi-denominational, grassroots movement dedicated to providing family-style residential care for orphaned children at high risk of sexual and economic exploitation in Cambodia, Thailand and India.

Ruling year info

2002

Principal Officer

Mr. John Mark McCollum

Main address

296 West Fourth Avenue

Columbus, OH 43201 USA

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EIN

34-1971847

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Single Organization Support (L11)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The plight of orphaned and abandoned children is one of the greatest humanitarian crises facing our world today. By some estimates more than 150,000,000 children live as orphans. Their parents have died, have left them, or have been separated from them by forced labor, natural disaster or migration. Children without parents face dangers at every turn; they’re vulnerable to disease, malnutrition — and they’re at extraordinarily high risk for economic and sexual exploitation. Some of these children are taken in by relatives who will give them high-quality care. A tiny percentage of these children can be adopted internationally. But untold millions of these children languish in abject poverty without proper food, shelter or protection from those who would do them harm.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family-style Orphan Homes

Asia's Hope operates and funds family-style orphan homes for children at risk of sexual and economic exploitation in Cambodia, Thailand and India.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Children and youth
People of East Asian descent
People of South Asian descent
People of Southeast Asian descent

Asia's Hope operates an elementary school for 200 children -- most of whom are orphaned children in the full-time care of Asia's Hope -- in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. We also operate a middle and high school for 325 students in Battambang, Cambodia.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People of Asian descent
Orphans
Out-of-home youth

Asia's Hope provides all of its graduates the opportunity to attend university or receive vocational training.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We exist to make orphanages more like families.

We're working hard to provide a high-nurture, family-style environment for each of the children currently in our care, giving those children the social, educational, psychological and spiritual resources they'll need to not just survive, but thrive as independent adults.

Perhaps more importantly, we're developing a model of care that can be emulated, adapted and applied in resource-challenged settings around the globe.

Where many advocate the abandonment of full-time residential care, we understand that there will always be a role for orphanages, and we're committed to demonstrating that they can — with the right philosophy, strategy and tactics — be nourishing, positive environments where children who have been permanently separated from their parents can flourish.

Strategy One: Enrichment

Enrich the lives of our existing children and staff: We must generously fund university and vocational training scholarships, increase caregiver training and provide additional support staff to ensure that each Asia's Hope child is given the opportunity to emerge from our care an educated and equipped individual: empowered to serve their family of origin, their community and country, and the church with their uniquely realized talents and spiritual gifts.

Strategy Two: Expansion

Expand our capacity to accept new children into our care: To support the addition of new homes, new staff members and new initiatives, we must build our organizational capacity, adding key communications, finance, and program staff.

Strategy Three: Extension

Extend our model to future generations and other organizations: We must free up our existing leaders, promote or next-generation leaders and invest in the development of knowledge, skills and personnel we need to see our model take root in developing countries around the world.

Asia's Hope's program affiliates in Cambodia, Thailand and India are staffed by skilled and empowered indigenous workers who understand the contours of their country's cultural and political landscape. We enjoy close relationships with local governments and seek the oversight and accountability that those relationships require.

Our support affiliates in the United States and Canada provide financial and logistical support for our projects in Asia. We maintain longterm relationships with generous supporters — churches, businesses, individuals and family foundations.

We have demonstrated that residential orphan care does not have to be institutional, that it can closely resemble a family and provide a healthy environment where children who cannot be safely reintegrated with their biological family or community of origin can thrive.

We have built a model that is worthy of widespread emulation. We have not yet developed the curricula and the personnel to allow us to adequately mentor orphan care providers from around the globe who have asked for our assistance in implementing our model in their countries. Nor have we achieved sufficient stature to advocate for our model on the world stage.

We have secured the funding necessary to maintain 35 children's homes and three schools in three countries. We have thus transformed the lives of more than 800 children who receive comprehensive care in our homes and hundreds more who receive education and nutrition at our schools while remaining in the custody of their biological families.

We have not, however, raised the funds we need to equip our organization to transform the entire sector, advocating for our model and training others to implement it in under-resourced communities around the world.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently implemented significant upgrades in our fiscal oversight and physical security plans based on feedback from the population we serve and our in-country staff.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

ASIAS HOPE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ASIAS HOPE

Board of directors
as of 2/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Keith Wong


Board co-chair

Sherrod Fields

Ron Biddle

John Campbell

Keith Wong

Glenn Kelly

John McCollum

Adam Heath

Melanie Forsythe

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/09/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.