FRIENDSHIP ANIMAL PROTECTIVE LEAGUE

Friendship is a wag away

aka Friendship Animal Protective League of Lorain County   |   Elyria, OH   |  www.friendshipapl.org

Mission

We are dedicated to:

ensuring that no companion animal suffers without the basic necessities to live a healthy life,
providing the education to promote and nurture the human/animal bond, and
treating all who seek our help with dignity, kindness and respect.

Ruling year info

1959

Executive Director

Mr. Gregory Willey

Main address

8303 Murray Ridge Road

Elyria, OH 44035 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Lorain County Animal Protective League

EIN

34-6529498

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

We are responsible for the daily care of 200 companion animals and 3,200 animals every year. We provide food, water, litter, vaccinations, and microchips for all our animals. We ensure that all our animals receive access to spay/neuter services and other veterinary care as needed.

Population(s) Served

Prevent animal cruelty by enforcing animal protection laws and educating the public about adequate shelter and proper animal care.

Population(s) Served

Find new and loving homes for the companion pets in our care.

Population(s) Served

Provide education to promote and nurture the human/animal bond.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

One of our goals as an organization is to try to save more lives than the year before. We have been able to achieve this through collaboration with shelters with at risk animals or low adoption rates.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of days of shelter stay for animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of Community Cats Trapped/Neutered and Returned to Field

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humane Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have recently begun a trap/neuter/return program for community cats in the cities of Elyria and North Ridgeville.

Total dollars of operating costs per animal per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Calculated by using total expenses divided by number of animals rescued. That number was then divided by the average length of stay. The longer an animal stays, the more that cost is distributed.

Number of full-time staff members per animal

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Hours of Volunteer Service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We saw a significant jump in 2015. This jump was due to significant growth in our foster program from the previous year.

Live Release Percentage - Dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents the percentage of dogs that were adopted, transferred or returned to owner.

Live Release Percentage - Cats

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering orphaned and abused animals

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents the percentage of dogs that were adopted, transferred or returned to owner or field.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Every year we set these goals for ourselves -

Annually increase the number of animals for which we provide care.

Decrease the unnecessary euthanasia of companion animals locally and statewide.

Increase collaborative efforts with other government, humane societies and independent rescue groups.

Increase adoptions and/or live release rate.

Decrease the length of stay for animals at our shelter.

Increase educational opportunities for the public to learn about topics related to animal welfare.

Increase volunteerism and foster capacity.

Our strategic plan for meeting our goals consists:

Annually increase the number of dogs we take in every. Increase volunteerism and foster capacity.

We only have 53 kennels at our facility. The best way to increase capacity is to continue to grow our foster program. This program has the fastest growth over the past 3 years. The program, which actively began in 2013, has increased from 6,946 hours in that year to 20,950 hours in 2015. We calculate this number as 2 hours of volunteer service per day an animal is housed in a volunteer foster home. For every additional foster home we develop, we expand our capacity to help more companion animals. This year we have begun an individual foster training program to actively recruit and train new fosters.

Decrease the unnecessary euthanasia of companion animals locally and statewide. Increase collaborative efforts with other government, humane societies and independent rescue groups.

The best way to decrease euthanasia at high volume, open intake shelters throughout Ohio requires us to collaborate with rescue organizations and county run facilities statewide. Every year, we look to expand the reach of our organization. With a limited number of staff to traverse the state, we find it more efficient to work alongside other organizations already pulling animals in those areas. Last year, we were able to help 636 dogs from other shelters. That was up 26% from 2014.

Increase adoptions and/or live release rate. Decrease the length of stay for animals at our shelter.

Our live release rate for dogs is already at 97%. This is a number with which we are generally comfortable. Our live release rate for cats is 84%. We feel this is an area where we can see improvement through increased adoption rates and foster homes and decreased length of stay.
We had two groups of cats and kittens we rescued in 2015 that we feel can be attributed to two separate outbreaks of panleukopenia in the shelter. If those cats and kittens, which we identified as being high risk, were housed externally rather than internally, the other cats and kittens in the shelter would not have been put at risk. We may have also taken internal measures to have limited the exposure of our current kittens. This year we will be locating small banks of cages throughout the facility to house animals rather than keeping them all in one room. This should limit the potential for exposure. At the same time, we will be actively recruiting new fosters to house kittens offsite.
We use all forms of media to increase awareness of the animals we have at the shelter. We have a presence on television and in local newspapers. We utilize social media and encourage our volunteers and visitors to post on social media. We focus on story telling and quality photos to showcase our adoptable pets. Through this, we have managed to drop our length of stay from 47 days to 39 days for cats and 20 days to 18 days for dogs.

Our 16,000 square foot facility was built in 1997. It is built to house 53 dogs and puppies and approximately 123 cats. Since 2010, we have expanded our capacity for cats to 178 plus additional housing for kittens. Currently, we have 48 foster homes all with specific abilities to house puppies, dogs, cats or kittens or large animals.

We have built up our relationship with a variety of rescue organizations including,

Geauga Rescue Moms - East side of Ohio and Statewide
Kaleidoscope K9s - Mid and southern Ohio
Multiple Breed Rescue - Western Ohio
Fido's Companion - Western Ohio

These groups allow us to combine resources and pools of volunteers to expand all of our rescue and foster capacity without necessarily diminishing our ability to provide in-house care to our animals.

We were able to assist 18 different county facilities throughout Ohio thanks to the work of our staff, volunteers, and partner organizations. Most notably, we have seen dramatic decreases in euthanasia in our two oldest partner counties - Lorain County Dog Warden (96% live release rate) and Holmes County Dog Warden (96% live release rate).

Though we have a small staff (13), our volunteer program provides the equivalent of 9 (18,000 hours) additional full-time, on-site staff.

Utilizing volunteers and social media, we are able to expand our reach across the state and nationwide. This has increased not only are local adoptions but our out of state adoptions as well. Our access to local media has stayed consistent allowing us to share our animals on local television, newspapers and radio.

In 2009, when the current executive director took over the shelter, Friendship Animal Protective League was on the verge of closing. The vote of the board was split down the middle with about 50% of them voting to close the facility permanently. Those that were in favor of closing resigned rather then begin the work of rebuilding.

Since then, we have accomplished so much.

We have built a cattery, outdoor dog runs, modified two of our animal rooms to more modern standards of care. We have updated our air conditioning and heating systems. Using our local Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, we have repainted and installed new flooring throughout 50% of the shelter.

We have increased the number of animals we have helped by just under 200% - 1,100 in 2010 and 3,200 in 2015.

We have instituted a Trap/Neuter/Return program.

We have grown our staff from 6 part-time and two full-time staff to 13 full-time and one part-time staff person.

We have built strong relationships with our veterinarian community, city and county officials, and local law enforcement.

We have expanded our volunteer and foster programs.

We have seen 6 consecutive years of donor growth despite having no professional staff dedicated to development.

Where we still need improvement -

50% of our shelter still need to be updated. Many of the housing areas still need to be brought up to more modern standards of animal enclosures.

Our roof still leaks.

We would like to move toward having an in-house spay/neuter clinic.

Our board still needs to see development following the collapse in 2009.

Financials

FRIENDSHIP ANIMAL PROTECTIVE LEAGUE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FRIENDSHIP ANIMAL PROTECTIVE LEAGUE

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Amy Richards

Cleveland Indians

Term: 2020 - 2022


Board co-chair

Patrick Radachi

Spira Benefits, LLC

Term: 2020 - 2022

Linda Stepan

Brouse McDowell

Amy Richards

Cleveland Indians

Patrick Radachi

Spira Benefits, LLC

Deb McFadden

Osborne Capital Group

Lisa Brown

The LCCC Foundation

Dawn Ermler-Fischer

WKYC-TV

Chris Pyanowski

Lorain County Prosecutor’s Office

David Humphrey

Ohio Desk

Remus Tomici

RIK Enterprises, LLC

Lisa Parente

Pease & Associates, CPAs

Sarah McCormick

Thompson Hine

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability