SILVER2022

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis, Inc.

A Place to Become

Indianapolis, IN   |  http://www.bgcindy.org

Mission

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis believes that every young person deserves to live a life filled with hope and opportunity.  Because we care about our young people, we provide a safe, educational, and positive atmosphere where they can prosper and reach their full potential.  This has been our mission since our founding in 1893.

Ruling year info

1937

CEO & Executive DIrector

Maggie Lewis

Main address

615 N Alabama St Suite 400

Indianapolis, IN 46204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-0888754

NTEE code info

Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined) (O23)

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BGCI believes every young person deserves to live a life filled with hope and opportunity. BGCI aims to provide a Club experience that assures success is within reach of every young person who enters our doors from the communities of Indianapolis. BGCI aims to provide the tools and resources necessary for all members educationally, physically, and emotionally. Our hope is that all members stay on track to graduate from high school with a plan for the future, develops good character and citizenship, and selects to live a healthy lifestyle.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Afterschool and Summer programs

BGCI serves youth between the ages of 5-18 through a variety of programs including homework assistance, technology centers, teen centers, career exploration, job assistance, sports and recreation, art classes and leadership development. Our nationally recognized afterschool and summer programs are designed to help youth achieve academic success, healthy lifestyles, and good character & citizenship.

Our Clubs offer daily afterschool homework help and tutoring programs such as POWER Hour and Indiana’s Kids. Additionally, our Clubs provide weekly academic enrichment programs that focus on literacy, STEM, and critical thinking skills.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Triple Play was developed by Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) and consists of the following components. The "Mind" component promotes health and well-being through nutrition and fitness education classes such as Healthy Habits. The "Body" component includes sports, fitness activities, and Daily Challenges to encourage physical fitness and strength. The "Soul" component utilizes recreation activities to reinforce social and ethical skills young people need to be successful.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis (BGCI) offers a wide variety of sports and fitness activities to complement the Triple Play program. Each of BGCI's Clubs has a gym and a designated fitness room and two of our Clubs have indoor swimming pools.

Triple Play Healthy Habits classes provide age-appropriate information and ideas for members to improve their eating habits and gain a sense of control over their health. The program teaches Club members how to choose a healthy diet and portion sizes, prepare healthy meals and snacks, establish regular physical activity and practice good oral hygiene. Programs are offered twice a week in age-specific groups at all Clubs.

Triple Play Daily Challenges promote skills in a fun, noncompetitive yet challenging environment through activities that give participants the opportunity to learn new movements and skills and help improve their speed, strength and agility. There are a number of different Daily Challenges a few of which include Basketball, Jump Rope, Invent-a-Sport, Home Run, Get Fit, and Walk/Run. Each challenge is designed to increase the amount of time members participate in physical activities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Power Hour is a national program of Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) designed to provide Club members with the support, resources and guidance necessary to complete their homework – and start the school day with a sense of confidence and ability. The philosophy underlying the Power Hour program is that the benefits of homework are threefold – academic, behavioral and social. By working on homework after school, members reinforce skills and concepts learned that day. In addition, homework completion leads to long-term improvements in members’ grades and test scores.

Power Hour offers a structured time and place for Club staff and volunteers to help members with their school work. Members emerge from the program better prepared for classes and proud of their hard work and accomplishments. Ask successful adults to whom they credit their success, and many cite the names of mentors who inspired them at a critical time.

As members complete homework assignments and bonus activities, they accumulate Power Points, which may be used to obtain Power Rewards – prizes, activities and incentives. In addition, Power Hour offers tutoring assistance for members who need additional work in special areas.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

BGCI's art programs enable youth to develop their creativity and cultural awareness through knowledge and appreciation of the visual arts, crafts, performing arts, and creative writing. The art programs include a broad range of styles and concepts including drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpting, mixed media, photography, fiber arts, music, and dance. Participants also have the opportunity to present their work and evaluate the artwork of both famous artists and their peers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

BGCI's character and leadership programs empower youth to support and influence their Club and community. Many of our Club members participate in community service projects and join our Keystone Club. Our staff and volunteers regularly mentor Club kids, serve as positive role models for them, and encourage these youth to become leaders both within the Clubs and in life.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis (BGCI) College Readiness program provides teens with the information and tools necessary to navigate through college applications, scholarships, financial aid information and more. Club members participate in college tours and spend time researching schools, certificates or degrees, and financial aid options. Program components provide participants the opportunity to explore, developing their self-awareness and understanding of the post-secondary environment.

BGCI's College Readiness program leads members through a curriculum, counseling participants on their barriers to success, following up on their progress toward goal completion, and serves as a resource for information about post-secondary education. Our College Readiness Coordinator serves on the BGCI Scholarship committee and refers participants to the scholarship program. In addition, BGCI facilitates informational sessions for parents so families can also help prepare for and support their college bound teen.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

SMART Moves, developed by Boys & Girls Clubs of America, is a comprehensive curriculum with components targeted to specific age groups. SMART Moves teaches youth how to resist alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, peer pressure and bullying, and premature sexual activity.

Through the following age-appropriate modules, SMART Moves provides youth with the knowledge, skills and self-esteem to help them make healthy choices and practice responsible behaviors:

* SMART Kids: A skills development program for boys and girls ages 5 to 9. The program focus is on self-awareness, decision making and interpersonal skills, while communicating age appropriate information about alcohol and other drugs.

* Start SMART: A resistance skills program for youth ages 9 to 12 that focuses on ways to identify and resist peer, social and media pressures to use alcohol, tobacco, other drugs or become sexually involved. It includes age appropriate discussions on puberty and friendships.

* Stay SMART: A social skills program for adolescents ages 13 to 15 that teach resistance skills, stress reduction techniques, communication skills, assertiveness training and life planning. It provides accurate information about alcohol use, tobacco use, other drug use and adolescent sexuality.

* SMART Girls is a small-group program that helps girls ages 8 to 12 and 13 to 17 develop healthy attitudes and lifestyles. Participants explore their own and societal attitudes and values as they practice life skills for nutritional eating, physical fitness, accessing the health care system, resolving conflict and building healthy mentoring relationships.

* Passport to Manhood promotes and teaches responsibility for male Club members ages 11-14. At a critical and transitional time in their adolescence, boys are encouraged to adopt the character virtues that will give them a positive head start in their journey to manhood.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students receiving homework help

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults

Related Program

Power Hour

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on attendance data reported through BGCA annual report.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

College Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentages based on NYOI member survey responses.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Character & Leadership

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on attendance data reported through BGCA annual report.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

SMART Moves

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentages based on NYOI member survey responses.

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Character & Leadership

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on attendance data reported through BGCA annual report.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe that youth in Marion County should be able to live lives filled with hope and opportunity and reach their full potential. We want youth in Marion County to be safe, healthy, and successful. Specifically we want them to:
• Be physically and emotionally safe; learn and use conflict resolution skills
• Be physically active; have access to sufficient and nutritious food; avoid risky behaviors
• Be academically successful; have a career plan that includes post-secondary education; engage in community service and volunteerism
We have set several short-term goals in alignment with the long-term impacts we seek.

The safety of our members is always our first priority. While we do many things to ensure their safety, our key goal in this area is to improve their conflict resolution skills.
• 25% of members surveyed in the annual BGCA National Youth Outcomes Initiative (NYOI) Member Survey will demonstrate optimal conflict resolution skills.

We have two goals in the area of health.
• 70% of members surveyed in the annual BGCA NYOI Member Survey will report being physically active for 60 minutes fiver or more days per week.
• 75% of teens surveyed on the annual BGCA NYOI Member Survey will report avoiding risky behavior (tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, & fighting)

We have three goals in the area of success.
• 90% of eligible 7th and 8th graders will enroll in the 21st Century Scholars program.
• 60% of summer program participants will maintain or increase their reading fluency level.
• 50% of members surveyed in the annual BGCA NYOI Member Survey will demonstrate strong leadership and teamwork skills.

Rigorous program evaluation:
The leadership team of each Club reviews evaluation reports twice each year: once for the school year program (focusing on the NYOI Member and Staff Surveys) and once for the summer program (focusing on the math/reading assessments and member survey). Action plans are developed to address program areas in which members are not yet meeting the goals.

Pulse checks:
We are implementing a program of “pulse checks” to get real-time feedback through quick exit polls and listening sessions. Exit polls will ask a single Question of the Day to track how we are doing around key issues like member safety, bullying, and recognition. Listening sessions (aka focus groups) will invite members to express concerns and make recommendations for program improvement. We expect that the pulse checks will also increase members’ sense of belonging and enhance the quality of their relationships with adult staff and volunteers.

Professional development:
Through workshops, coaching, and professional conferences, staff learn how to implement high-yield learning activities, use positive behavior management to address disciplinary issues, incentivize good decision-making and reward achievement, and mentor young people.

For over 125 years, BGCI has existed to support families and care for youth during after-school hours and summer days when a safe, supervised environment is crucial. BGCI provides programming at a price that makes it accessible for youth who most need these services – kids from low-income and single-parent households. BGCI was founded on the core belief that the inability to pay is never a reason to turn a child away. BGCI provides members with educational opportunities, character development programs, and a means to realize their full potential and hope for the future.

BGCI serves approximately 5,000 youth in Marion County through our 10 Club locations, many of whom come from low-income families (90%) and live in single-parent households (50%). BGCI plays a critical roles in the development of each youth the comes through our Blue Doors. When kids attend a Boys & Girls Club, they experience a safe, welcoming environment in which they will have every opportunity available to grow, belong and become their very best self.

BGCI uses a variety of tools to ensure organizational quality and sustainability. This includes training for staff throughout the year on topics including: guidance and discipline techniques, program implementation, developmental stages, Club safety, First Aid/CPR and more. Active board committees oversee facilities, programs, finances, resource development, and human resources. Additionally, BGCI relies on evidence-based best practices in youth development for all of our services. BGCI's primary objective is to have a positive impact on the youth we serve.

BGCI has many recent accomplishments that demonstrate the impact the organization has in the community. The organization is fortunate to have the largest endowed Boys & Girls Club Scholarship program in the country. It is fully self-supporting and does not use any of the organization’s operating funds. Since 1970, more than $1,000,000 in scholarships has been awarded to over 400 Club members, pursuing higher education. Through the scholarships, committee members and staff can build relationships with the students and get to know their individualized needs. It is through these relationships that BGCI encourages youth to think beyond their neighborhoods and plan for their future whether that is the pursuit of a four-year college, technical school, or a career.

Another significant accomplishment is BGCI’s Evening Reporting Center (ERC) program. BGCI provides oversight of the ERC Program for the Marion County Superior Court system as part of the Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative. Services are offered to youth referred through the Juvenile Court either pre-trial or post-disposition as an alternative to detention. The ERC program is designed to reduce recidivism by providing intensive supervision and structured programs and activities for youth during out of school time. Youth referred to the ERC program are required to attend daily educational programs, weekly cognitive behavioral group programs, and monthly service projects. Through these programs, youth increase their academic success, build positive relationships with peers and adult staff members, and change dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors. The organization’s ERC Program has demonstrated a consistently low recidivism rate. In 2017 recidivism rate of among BGCI’s ERC program participants was 16.4%, a stark contrast to Marion County’s rate of 33% in 2017 demonstrating program impact.

In 2018, BGCI opened the Pivot Re-Engagement Center. The Far Eastside Re-Engagement Center is designed to provide recreational programming for young men between the ages of 16-24, who are not enrolled in school and are not employed, with the long-term goal of building positive, mentor-like relationships and engaging them in High School Equivalency or job placement programs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Indianapolis, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lisa Osterman

Community Solutions

Term: 2018 - 2020

Carl Dennin

Messer Construction Company

Donna Wilkinson

Pacers Sports & Entertainment

Daren Kingi

Visit Indy

Robert Hofinger

Ernst & Young

David Keever

Crowe Horwath

William Marty

Community Volunteer

Lisa Osterman

Community Solutions Inc.

Benham Roberts

Salesforce

Srisu Subrahmanyam

Karr Auction Services

Christopher Dukate

Crowe Horwath

Barbara Cutillo

Community Volunteer

Saundra Gilbert

Duke Realty

B. Ronan Johnson

Taft Stettinius & Hollister, LLP

James Keough

MacAllister Machinery

Marty Posch

Finish Line Youth Foundation

Amy Wilson

Frost Brown Todd, LLC

Dave Witucki

ADP

James Smith

Community Volunteer

Jeff Voyles

Voyles, Vaiana, Lukemeyer, Baldwin & Webb

Kristian Stricklan

Indianapolis Public Schools

Chayzee Smith

MSD Pike Township Schools

Alicia Shulhof

Peyton Manning's Children Hospital

Bryan Roach

Roche Diagnostics

Jason Hunter

WISH-TV

Todd Marty

Coca-Cola Bottling Compnay

Sandra Hatch

Salesforce

Andrew Crask

Bank of America

Kelly Copes-Anderson

Eli Lilly & Company, Inc.

Scott Clayton

Angie's List

Kelly Carpenter

AES Corporation/Indianapolis Power & Light

Thomas Burns

GEICO

Patrick Jessee

Lumatic Imagery

David Corbitt

Krieg Devault

Debrah Whitfield

Community Health Network

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/3/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability