GOLD2023

Assistance League of Indianapolis, Inc.

Transforming Lives - Serving Community

aka Assistance League of Indianapolis   |   Indianapolis, IN   |  http://www.alindy.org

Mission

Assistance League volunteers transforming the lives of children and adults through community programs, For the year beginning June 1, 2021 and ending May 31, 2022, members devoted 16223.5 charitable hours, which if paid by an employer would calculate to $482,162* The Assistance League of Indianapolis 2021-22 fiscal year expense budget is $443,000. *According to the U.S. Department of Labor, at the end of the fiscal year of May 31, 2022, the value of one volunteer hour is estimated to be $29.72.

Ruling year info

1986

President

Ms. Sharon Gleason

Main address

1475 W 86th St, Suite E

Indianapolis, IN 46260 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-1635410

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assistance League of Indianapolis is determined to provide programs and services that no other organization does.  We were the first to provide new teddy bears for comfort.  What’s trendy today is something we have quietly done for more than 30 years.  We’ve been providing new, clean clothes for victims of sexual and domestic assault for nearly 25 years – way before #MeToo was a movement. We think the above really hits at the heart of all of ALI's programs.  Each is entirely unique or we were the first to do them in our community. Operation School Bell, for over 34 years has empowered students by providing the proper school clothing, shoes, and other items, which increases school attendance, improves peer interactions, increases opportunity for improved reading skills, and cuts down on bullying. By providing dress code-compliant clothing, students can spend more time learning and less time worrying about clothing violations and teasing/bullying by classmates.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Operation School Bell

Operation School Bell®, which began in Indianapolis in 1984, offers three distinct programs that provide new clothing and athletic shoes to children that live in poverty, helping them to arrive at school ready to learn. Over 68,743 children have benefited from this program since its inception.

Apparel Division- Provides new school uniforms, winter coats, and toothbrushes to students in grades K-6 in Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) and MSDs of Lawrence, Pike, Warren, and Washington Townships in Marion County.

Shoes Division -Provides new athletic shoes/socks to 2850 students,grades K-8 in IPS and MSDs of Lawrence,Pike,Warren,Washington, and Wayne Townships in Marion County, 54,300 to date.

Beyond the Bell Division - Provides an inventory of clothing to all IPS and Pike Township elementary schools for use by school personnel. Beyond the Bell serves to aid students who are homeless, displaced or new to their school, and not otherwise served by Operation School Bell-Apparel.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Economically disadvantaged people

The ALI Bears Program has given over 25,780 soft cuddly bears to children and adults struggling with grief, serious illness or trauma.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Since 1994, Assault Survivor Kits®, have provided comfort to adults and children who have been victims of assault and violence with new clothing to wear home when their clothing is retained as evidence of a crime following their examination at a hospital. Nearly 17,452 kits have been distributed to 20 hospitals and agencies around the Indianapolis area. 22,479 undergarments have also been distributed by these agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Through the ALI Friends Program, companionship and caring is offered to seniors and disabled adults.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Vision: Essential needs are met in our community and families flourish.

The volunteer members of Assistance League of Indianapolis provide comfort and caring throughout the year through our four philanthropic programs that are designed to help transform the lives of thousands of children and adults in the Central Indiana community. As one of the 120 local chapters of National Assistance League, we share the overall mission, vision and the core values of National Assistance League - Commitment, Leadership, Ethics, Accountability and Respect.

For the year beginning June 1, 2018 through May 31, 2019, volunteer members devoted 24,933 charitable hours, which if paid by an employer would calculate to $642,773* The Assistance League of Indianapolis 2019-120 fiscal year expense budget is $542,932. *According to the U.S. Department of Labor, at the end of the fiscal year of May 31, 2018, the value of one volunteer hour is estimated to be $25.78.

Success would be the ability to provide 100% of the needs requested by the organizations and schools with whom we are contracted. The Strategic Plan of Assistance League® of Indianapolis lists six measurable goals that guides the direction and business model of the Chapter.

The two key resources to achieve success are funds and volunteer hours. Assistance League of Indianapolis is constantly striving to grow our membership and financial support and to allow our philanthropic programs to expand and serve more individuals.

The goals and strategies of Assistance League of Indianapolis are defined in our Strategic Plan.

The first measurable goal in our Strategic Plan is to strengthen membership by balancing the age and the skill demographics when recruiting new members to ensure the longevity of the Chapter. The Chapter provides education and training to new and existing members to bolster participation in our philanthropic programs and to expand the pool of members filling leadership positions. This is accomplished by providing enhanced orientations and continuing education to ensure members understand and commit to their responsibilities of time, money and talent. New members have increased by 5.84% annually.

The second and third goals of the Strategic Plan sets success as working to meet 100% of allocations from the agencies and schools that we serve. The Chapter has adjusted the services and items provided for each program as needed and explored new delivery procedures in an effort to achieve this goal.

The fourth goal of the Strategic Plan is to strive to achieve an annual balanced budget. Assistance League of Indianapolis has been recognized and rewarded by many of our major grantors for being fiscally responsible by being conservative in investing and budgeting. The Chapter supports and manages annual fundraising events/activities to generate at least 1/3 of budgeted revenue. Chapter sponsored fundraising events include: the annual Holiday Luncheon; the Operation School Bell® Fall Mailer; and a Spring Event. The remaining 2/3 of budgeted revenue is generated by grants and donations. All funds raised by and donated to Assistance League of Indianapolis stay within our community to support the needs of the children and adults served by our philanthropic programs. An independent official audit reported that 92¢ of every dollar raised was returned to the Indianapolis community through our philanthropic programs.

The fifth goal of the Strategic Plan is to support an ongoing effort to communicate the Chapter’s work and successes to the community to generate awareness of the impact of our philanthropic programs on the lives of those in need our community. We are working diligently to expand our profile within the community by utilizing our website and social media outlets to communicate with a broader segment of the population. We are attending networking opportunities where our story can be told and which has resulted in greater name recognition within the community.

The sixth goal of the strategic plan is to enhance our leadership to secure the future role of our organization. We are improving the training of our leaders to better prepare them for their positions and building a closer relationship with our Advisory Council members.

Assistance League of Indianapolis is governed by Bylaws, Standing Rules and Policies specific to managing, funding and effectively executing our philanthropic programs that are customized for our community. The Chapter is led by an annually elected Board of Directors consisting of members who each serve a term of one year. We also seek expertise within the community through an established Advisory Council and other sources as needed.

Our strongest asset to achieving success is our volunteer membership consisting of a dedicated and diverse group with various backgrounds, experiences, and talents. Our volunteer members are critical to the management and execution of all our philanthropic programs. We do not have any paid staff.

Our programs:

Operation School Bell®
Operation School Bell, which began in Indianapolis in 1984, offers three distinct programs that provide new clothing and athletic shoes to children that live in poverty, helping them to arrive at school ready to learn.

Operation School Bell-Apparel, during the fall of the 2018-19 school year served 3,376 students at the School Bell Shop. Each child left with a duffel bag filled with a new winter coat and multiple sets of school clothing, hygiene items and new age appropriate books. Assistance League volunteer members shopped with each child to find appropriate sizes and styles. 61,648 children have benefited from this program since its inception.

Operation School Bell-Shoes gave new athletic shoes and socks to over 2,850 elementary students during a 2-week session in the fall. Through an 18 year partnership with Shoe Carnival 48,307 children received new shoes and socks.

The Beyond the Bell division of Operation School Bell provided an inventory of clothing to Indianapolis elementary schools to distribute to students on an immediate needs basis by school social workers/nurses. A supply of clothing was distributed in the fall and winter semesters. Each IPS elementary school received identical bags of new school clothing items in a variety of sizes that included: 17 pairs of uniform pants, 17 uniform shirts, 24 girls briefs, 24 boys briefs, 18 pair socks, 17 belts and bras by request.

While we have impacted the lives of thousands of children and adults in our community over the past 34 years, there is still much to be done as the needs change and grow each year especially in the time of Covid. Our accomplishments include:

Operation School Bell®, which began in Indianapolis in 1984, offers three distinct programs that provide new clothing and athletic shoes to children that live in poverty, helping them to arrive at school ready to learn.

Apparel Division - Provides new school uniforms, winter coats, hygiene items to students in grades K-6 in Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) and MSDs of Lawrence, Pike, Warren, and Washington Townships in Marion County, IN.

Shoes Division - Provides new athletic shoes to students in grades K-5 in IPS, and MSDs of Lawrence, Pike, Warren, Washington, and Wayne Townships in Marion County, IN.

Beyond the Bell Division - Provides an inventory of clothing to all IPS elementary schools for use by school personnel.


Assault Survivor Kits, since 1994, has provided warm, comfortable, new clothing for men, women, and children, victims of assault or domestic violence, to wear home when their clothing is retained as evidence of a crime. A kit contains socks, briefs, a sweatshirt and sweatpants. Additional undergarments are also provided separately along with hygiene items for cleaning up after the hospital exam. Members assemble the kits and deliver them to 20 hospitals and agencies in 10 counties around the Indianapolis area. As of May 2018, 14,258 kits and 18,270 additional undergarments have been delivered.

ALI Bears, has contracts with 20 hospitals, hospices and abuse management agencies. These cuddly bears are given to any child or adult who has suffered emotional or physical pain. To date, over 22,000 bears have lent comfort to those in need.

ALI Friends, since 1990, provides companionship and activities for seniors and the disabled in specific centers in the Indianapolis area. Bingo, games, birthday parties and holiday parties are fun for clients and members alike.

In an effort to strive to meet the changing needs of our community and those in greatest need, we continue to critically assess our Strategic Plan.

We look to strengthen membership development and retention and membership recruitment efforts.

We continually evaluate our current avenues of financial support and explore new grant and donation opportunities and fundraising activities.

We endeavor to continue to be an example of a dedicated and enduring community-based nonprofit organization.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

Assistance League of Indianapolis, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Assistance League of Indianapolis, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/16/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Sharon Gleason

N/A

Term: 2022 - 2023

Judy Tomke

Mary Reid

Peggy Powell

Cathy Weimer

Adele Carr

Patty Johnson

Barb Shankel

Susan Kwiatkowski

Sunny Shuai

Deb Myers

Kathy Kinzel

Rosy Crowley

Kathy Wylam

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/12/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/12/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.