INDIANAPOLIS NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING PARTNERSHIP INC

aka INHP   |   Indianapolis, IN   |  inhp.org

Mission

The mission of the Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership (INHP) is to increase affordable and sustainable housing opportunities for individuals and families and serve as a catalyst for the development and revitalization of neighborhoods.

INHP's vision is that every person in Indianapolis has the opportunity to live in a safe, decent, and affordable home in a safe, decent, and affordable home in a vibrant neighborhood.

Notes from the nonprofit

For families with low- and moderate-incomes, homeownership can seem unattainable as it is difficult to qualify for a mortgage through traditional lending institutions. The most recent Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) data states that, in 2019, there were 18,000 home purchase mortgage applications in Indianapolis and, of these, nearly 6%of these applications were denied because of credit history, lack of collateral, and debt-to-income ratios. These are barriers that INHP regularly addresses with clients through its Homeownership Preparation Program. As an unbiased and trusted nonprofit, the organization has empowered over 39,000 working families to become and remain homeowners through offering an effective blend of. Its comprehensive homeowner and homebuyer services designed to create and support homeowners who can sustain their investment in their homes—ultimately helping to strengthen and encourage the growth of vibrant Indianapolis neighborhoods.

Ruling year info

1989

President

Ms. Moira Carlstedt

Main address

3550 N. Washington Boulevard

Indianapolis, IN 46205 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-1742559

NTEE code info

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to a 2019 report by The Polis Center, a family of four living in poverty is surviving on an annual income below $25,000; however, a four-person family with two school-aged children in Marion County needs $50,800 to be self-sufficient. A single parent with two children living in poverty has an annual income below $20,000, less than half that needed to be self-sufficient. Indianapolis families are more likely than ever to be housing cost burdened (spending more than 30% of their income on housing). Since 2014, tightening supply coupled with historically low interest rates and strong consumer demand caused existing home median sales prices in Marion County to increase 82%. And is now out of reach for the average borrower at 80% or below of the AMI. Combining the challenges facing homebuyers with the fact that nearly 50% of renters are spending more than 30% of their income on rent is why INHP deploys tools that help households access and sustain affordable housing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

INHP offers a variety of curriculum designed to help families prepare for and successfully maintain homeownership. Classes include Successful Renting, Dollars & Sense, Understanding Credit, and Homebuyer Education.

Population(s) Served

INHP offers one-on-one homeownership advising for up to 24 months to help families assess their potential to become and remain homeowners and qualify for affordable, sustainable mortgage financing.

Population(s) Served

Consumer Mortgage Lending
INHP enables families to access a home-purchase mortgage through a referral to a local lending institution or through the INHP direct lending program. INHP also provides access to affordable home repair loans to low-income families to ensure the ability to maintain homeownership.

Population(s) Served

While INHP families are three to four times less likely to default on their mortgages, INHP offers support to borrowers facing mortgage delinquency to help them remain in their home.

Population(s) Served

Affordable Housing Development and Preservation
INHP collaborates with community and neighborhood partners to invest improve or develop more affordable housing options in Marion County that are accessible to families with low and moderate incomes. Our strategies for increasing the supply include providing direct investment, community lending or grants to those committed to creating and maintaining the supply of affordable housing.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor

Where we work

Accreditations

Aeris Rating: 4-Star AA 2020

Affiliations & memberships

Aeris Rating - 4-Star AA 2020

Housing Partnership Network 2021

Opportunity Finance Network 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Working poor, Adults

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of families served through INHP's financial and homebuyer education classes, one-on-one homeowner advising, affordable home purchase and home repair mortgage lending, & post-purchase counseling

Number of loans issued to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Consumer Mortgage Lending

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Affordable home purchase and home repair mortgage loans and down payment assistance. The decrease in 2020 is a result of having to stop home repair mortgages from March - September due to COVID-19.

Total dollar amount of loans issued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Consumer Mortgage Lending

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Affordable home purchase and home repair mortgages and down payment assistance. The decrease in 2020 is a result of having to stop home repair mortgages from March - September due to COVID-19.

Number of housing units built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Affordable Housing Development and Preservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of affordable housing units impacted through community lending, grant making, single family development, single family development, and equitable transit-oriented development

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

All INHP’s programs are guided by the 2021-2023 Strategic Plan which commits the organization to pursue two aspirational goals, which were developed through a data-driven, research-based approach grounded in local economic, demographic and social trends. Through its efforts and activities, in a manner aligned with its mission and vision, INHP is committed to working towards the following aspirational goals:

1. From January 1, 2021, to December 31, 2023, INHP will expand, preserve, or upgrade the supply of quality affordable housing in Marion County by 2,100 units through land acquisition, financing, developing and grantmaking to support community partnerships that support access to and preservation of affordable housing.

2. From January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2023, INHP will directly support the origination of 1,200 home purchase first mortgages in Marion County.

INHP’s products and services are grounded in a comprehensive homeownership preparation and mortgage origination program designed to empower low- and moderate-income individuals and families to qualify for and obtain an appropriate affordable mortgage, purchase a home, and remain in the home for the long-term. Clients who complete INHP programs are fully prepared for long-term homeownership and become the seeds for stronger neighborhoods. In addition, INHP serves as a catalyst for neighborhood development and revitalization through the acquisition and rehabilitation of abandoned housing, and the development or preservation of affordable multifamily housing. Through these initiatives, INHP is responding to housing supply and demand in our city.

INHP Programs include:

Education
INHP offers a variety of curriculum designed to help families prepare for and successfully maintain homeownership. Classes include Successful Renting, Dollars & Sense, Understanding Credit, and Homebuyer Education.

Advising
INHP offers one-on-one homeownership advising for up to 24 months to help families assess their potential to become and remain homeowners and qualify for affordable, sustainable mortgage financing.

Consumer Mortgage Lending
INHP enables families to access a home-purchase mortgage through a referral to a local lending institution or through the INHP direct lending program. INHP also provides access to affordable home repair loans to low-income families to ensure the ability to maintain homeownership.

Post-Purchase Mortgage Counseling
While INHP families are three to four times less likely to default on their mortgages, INHP offers support to borrowers facing mortgage delinquency to help them remain in their home.

Affordable Housing Development and Preservation
INHP collaborates with community and neighborhood partners to invest improve or develop more affordable housing options in Marion County that are accessible to families with low and moderate incomes. Our strategies for increasing the supply include providing direct investment, community lending or grants to those committed to creating and maintaining the supply of affordable housing.

INHP’s leadership has over 145 years of combined experience and plays an integral role in affordable housing in Indianapolis. The organization holds an Indiana Mortgage Lending License (#11012) through the Indiana Department of Financial Institutions and is registered under the National Mortgage Licensing System (#84556). INHP is also a member of the Indiana Mortgage Bankers Association and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis and serves on the City of Indianapolis Housing Trust Fund Advisory Board. On a national level, INHP is a member of the Housing Partnership Network, a collaborative of 100 of the nation’s leading affordable housing and community development nonprofit, and Opportunity Finance Network, a national association of Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs).

INHP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit housing organization and a certified, Aeris-rated Community Development Financial Institution. INHP is the only nonprofit organization in Indianapolis providing a full range of home buyer education classes, homeownership advising programs, affordable mortgage products, and post-purchase counseling. INHP is listed as an approved housing counseling agency on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development website, helping clients feel confident in INHP’s recommended advising and education programs. The organization is the leading homeownership resource in Marion County dedicated to serving homeowners and homebuyers with low- and-moderate-incomes.

INHP is committed to helping families with low- and-moderate-incomes have safe, decent, and affordable housing. To achieve this, the Board of Directors and staff recognize that INHP income sources must be diversified. INHP has a full-time Advancement Department focused on building relationships with past, current, and potential new funders interested in investing in families, neighborhood vibrancy, community vitality, and future generations.

With respect to philanthropic support, INHP has seen tremendous growth in contributions from foundations, corporations and individuals. This growth is due to donor centered philanthropic culture that incorporates cultivation, solicitation, recognition, and stewardship strategies outlined in an annual fundraising plan and rooted in building and maintaining relationships with donors. INHP is making strides in diversifying its contributor base through direct mail, special events, grassroots fundraising, prospect analysis, and grant proposal writing.

INHP’s strong governance also contributes to the sustainability of its programs. Its leadership plays an integral role in affordable housing in Indianapolis. Its dedicated finance department works to ensure INHP’s financial strength and uses several tools to monitor and maintain fiscal health. INHP sets budget goals, which are driven by annual program and lending goals. The program and lending goals are tracked monthly.

INHP provides comprehensive, practical, goal-driven direction to consumers to repair credit, learn what to expect during the home buying process, select a suitable loan program, and ultimately close on a mortgage to purchase a home. Families work with an INHP Homeownership Coach for an average of eight months to learn budgeting and credit management skills and develop savings habits as well as the discipline to consistently apply them. This is a major effort to break the cycle of poverty.

In 2019, over 2,400 individuals participated in INHP’s Homeownership Preparation Program resulting in a 50-point average credit score increase for a consumer, and an average of $3,200 saved per household. The organization provided families with low- and moderate-income access to loan programs to purchase or repair a home. This included 206 INHP loans and 307 private sector loans for a total of 513 loans closed in 2019. These actions resulted in over $48.3 million in mortgage financing.

In 2019, INHP impacted 578 affordable housing units towards the five-year aspirational goal of 1,500 units. This number is 138% of the 2019 goal of 420.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Through feedback we learned that our communication with customers/realtors was not living up to expectations and causing uncertainty and stress to the process for our clients. We instituted a change in our MLO processes to include welcome calls to customers/realtors and weekly status updates to ensure better communication with the client and realtors in the transaction.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

INDIANAPOLIS NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING PARTNERSHIP INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

INDIANAPOLIS NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING PARTNERSHIP INC

Board of directors
as of 2/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Gina Miller

United Way of Central Indiana

Al Smith

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Gina Miller

United Way of Central Indiana

Moira Carlstedt

Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership

Dr. Robert Manuel

University of Indianapolis

Michael Petrie

Merchants Capital Corp.

Bruce Baird

Renew Indianapolis

Jennifer Green

Partners in Housing

John Corbin

Huntington Bank

Jeffrey Kittle

Kittle Property Group

Tony Mason

Indianapolis Urban League

John Hirschman

Browning

Mali Jeffers

GANGGANG

Mark Kugar

BMO Harris Bank

Marshawn Wolley

School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University

Dr. Dawn Haut

Eskenazi Health Centers

Nicole Lorch

First Internet Bank

Bill Bower

First Financial Bank

Lacy DuBose

State Farm

Juan Gonzalez

KeyBank

Paul Okeson

Garmong Construction Services

Greg Fennig

United Way of Central Indiana

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.