United Caring Shelters

Community Of Caring

aka United Caring Services   |   Evansville, IN   |  https://www.unitedcaringservices.org

Mission

To provide values-based, low barrier, sustainable, and high-quality homeless shelters, services, and solutions.

Notes from the nonprofit

February 2019: UCS redefined its mission and vision statements as part of a strategic planning process and set four, short term strategic objectives (SMART) to work on until a follow up board retreat in August where more short term goals and/or a couple longer term objectives will be added.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Jason Emmerson

Main address

PO Box 1071

Evansville, IN 47706 USA

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EIN

35-1892153

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Organization-Sponsored Eatery or Agency (K35)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

United Caring Services desires to be a place where individuals, organizations, and agencies collaboratively create a community of caring. It is by truly being a community of caring, that all people, especially those who are homeless, hungry, and hurting, might find relief, recovery, and restoration.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Day Shelter

Located in downtown Evansville, IN, our Day Shelter provides essential, emergency services to individuals and families in need -- meals, showers, clothing, available laundry services, mail service. This is the only low barrier, drop-in center of its kind, open 7 days a week (7a - 6p), for men, women, and children. We seek to prove a safe, secure, dignified, and compassionate experience tho those we serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Providing a safe, stable and clean environment with 56 available beds -- newly updated -- for men to sleep and shower. The programs operates 7am - 7pm with staff present at all times.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Men and boys

A separate "safe" facility with 26 night shelter beds for single women. Open 5pm - 7am, guests are able to rest, relax, sleep and receive essential and emergency support/case management with snacks/meals provided.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Women and girls

UCS offers 10 beds (6 for men and 4 for women) located as part of each the emergency shelters for people to rest and recuperate. Guests are referred by hospitals. UCS provides intense case management to ensure greater health, well-being, stability and housing success. Guests are able to remain during day time and night time hours -- meals, clothing, showers, and other support services offered.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

UCS offers 21 single occupancy efficiency apartments for men and women experiencing homelessness. Subsidies are available for those eligible. Case management and supportive services are offered.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Providing additional low barrier shelter for men, women, and children during inclement weather.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Division Award Winner - Business/Organization 2020

Leadership Everyone

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Women and girls, Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Unduplicated number of men and women sheltered in our emergency night shelter programs.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of meals served across programs to our guests

Number of low-income units in market-rate neighborhood

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Permanent Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

UCS offers low income, affordable single occupancy units to serve/stabilize men and women experiencing homelessness.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Day Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our amazing volunteers (faith groups, businesses, individuals, families) are essential to our operations. They serve 3 meals a day, paint, serve on committees & much more. *Numbers are approximate

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Day Shelter

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

3 meals a day served, clothing sorted, bike repair, painting, guests services -- a lot of opportunities to make a difference! *Numbers are approximate

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Homeless people, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Homeless Medical Respite Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Of the 85% safe discharges of guests after a respite stay, nearly 50% are into permanent housing. HMRP has reduced hospital readmission by 50% saving the community over $6 million since 2015

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Substance abusers

Related Program

Day Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Measuring the thru door numbers assuming a 95% duplication rate, this is how many people served in the Day Shelter.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to provide values-based, low barrier, sustainable, and high-quality homeless shelters, services, and solutions. As a part of the continuum of care, we are on the front lines helping people survive with the basics of life so they may flourish in permanent housing, employment and in good health.

UCS has four main strategies to make mission happen:

1) Building trust -- we desire to meeting the guests of our services where they are, knowing them for who they are, and helping them.
2) Being a low barrier shelter -- to the best of our abilities and the safety and security of everyone we seek to serve those in need.
3) Building partnership and community -- we seek to build a community of caring for our guests, donors and volunteers/ We wish to be inspirational and collaborative partners in our greater community, among the continuum of care.
4) Innovative ideas -- UCS seeks to operate beyond the status quo, exploring and pursuing programs like the medical respite program, to engage people and intersect issues with solutions rather than simply managing the problem.

1) Building better crisis communication and de-escalation skills for staff while focusing on our core values of compassion and dignity. Knowing people by name.
2) Always seeking to review, discuss, and eliminate unjust rules and lower punishment levels for infractions.
3) Operate outside of the UCS silo and intentionally bring agencies together to meet people's needs and ensure all services are being provided in the community. Engage donors and volunteers beyond the transaction, but rather, strive to be transformational in services tasks and relationship building.
4) Continually research and seek opportunities to better support the nearly 200 people a day who utilize our services and those who needs are not being met. Identify people's struggles, advocate for those who are slipping through the cracks, and lead community solution efforts -- bring people together to solve problems and not just talk about it.

Additional communications in-service training have been added.
Several rules have been eliminated with others' ramifications lessened. A new Program Manual is under review/in the creation process to bring things into greater consistency across programs.
While 'normal' monthly agency meetings are being maintained, an additional shelter group was formed to build better collaboration which started with a shared donation drive idea. Some mission/services idea and a community engagement idea are in the works too.
Exploration has started on the creation of a crisis stabilization unit/center to address issues of substance abuse and mental health issues.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Thanks to feedback and suggestions we identified client needs and we were able to expand services hours, target renovation projects, and seek additional funding/services to overcome stated barriers.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

United Caring Shelters
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Caring Shelters

Board of directors
as of 2/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brenda Phelps

Edward Jones

Term: 2018 - 2021

Brian Newton

CVS Pharmacy

David Cousert

USI

Joanna Wilson

Anthem

Brian Newton

Walmart Pharmacy

Tonya Rine

Vectren

LeaAnn Newman

Old National Bank

Brenda Phelps

Bethlehem UCC

Teri Couts

SS&C Technologies

Darla Jones

Hillcrest Youth Home

Sam Preston

USI

Lee Shafer

USI

Stephanie Weiner

Clergy

Wyeth Hatfield

Southwestern Behavioral Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.