INDIANA FOREST ALLIANCE INC

Indianapolis, IN   |  https://indianaforestalliance.org/

Mission

Our Mission:
To preserve and restore Indiana's native hardwood forest ecosystem for the enjoyment of all.

Our Vision:
Through expert research, influential advocacy, effective organizing, powerful storytelling, and when necessary, litigation, the Indiana Forest Alliance will ensure that the integrity of Indiana's forest ecosystem thrives as a natural resource to benefit native wildlife, soil, air and water quality; and as the emblem of our natural heritage. By leading a coalition of citizens, organizations and decision makers, IFA will establish, protect, and restore forests for future generations.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Jeffrey N Stant

Main address

615 N. Alabama Street Suite A

Indianapolis, IN 46204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-2059195

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Indiana Forest Alliance is the only organization in Indiana dedicated to restoration, protection, and enjoyment of the state's magnificent remaining public forests. IFA is the only organization standing ready to prevent the logging of 95% of our state forests in the next 15 years. While everyone enjoys state parks, state forests should be where we can enjoy the wildest nature Indiana has to offer. And unlike a land trust, IFA works to preserve and keep land public so that every citizen can benefit.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wild Indiana Campaign

IFA's Wild Indiana Campaign is intended to significantly expand and enhance a broad spectrum of recreation opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts in Indiana and the lower Midwest. The goal of the campaign is to establish 13 "Wild Areas" within seven state forests within some of Indiana's most pristine and biologically diverse forest areas. These areas would be protected from logging, road building, and other destructive activities. They will, however, allow for hiking, primitive camping, backpacking, hunting and fishing, mountain biking, and horseback riding on 36,820 acres stretching from about 25 miles south of Indianapolis, all the way to the Ohio River. The proposed Wild Areas represent some of the last and best remaining opportunities for people to experience the closed-canopy forests that were once the heart of the largest temperate hardwood forest in the world. The campaign, which roughly coincides with Indiana's bicentennial celebration of statehood, highlights the urgency of protecting the state's rich natural heritage found in these unique eastern hardwood forest ecosystems.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

IFA is conducting a three-part study to determine the inherent value of protecting our forests by contrasting the economic and social costs and benefits of protecting old-growth forests. Current practices tend to prioritize the management of state forests for timber harvests. The study includes an analysis of recreation and other revenue sources to determine how Indiana forests can generate funds. Selling carbon offsets on the California carbon compliance market might be a reasonable alternative to intensive logging. Many of Indiana's forests may qualify to reap the benefits of carbon sequestration through the sale of these offsets while maintaining a forest base for wilderness recreation. In doing so, the state eliminates the perceived need to continue commercial logging on Indiana's public lands.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Ecoblitz scientists have been documenting the interior forest habitats in which a diversity of species thrive since before 2015. Species recorded so far include 18 birds, salamanders, frogs, snakes, shrews, and bats that appear on state and federal endangered species lists. The total species count is now approaching some 2,000 species. No such inventory had been done before on state or national forest lands in Indiana. Ecoblitz data can help forest managers who previously have had to rely on incomplete, more than 30-year-old data on individual species when deciding whether to log tracts of state forests. It is the first comprehensive inventory (multi-year, throughout the entire growing season) of multiple taxa of flora and fauna conducted on a single tract of state or national forest land in Indiana. With the Ecoblitz, scientists can better characterize the total biodiversity within Indiana's hardwood forests with a focus on the activities of federal and state listed and rare species within the Ecoblitz area. IFA's 2015 Ecoblitz surveys resulted in a comprehensive inventory of flora and fauna within a 900-acre tract of interior forest in the heart of the Back Country Area that straddles the Morgan-Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests in Indiana's Brown and Monroe Counties. IFA is now conducting its Ecoblitz in the Combs Creek area of Hoosier National Forest.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

IFA's Wild Indiana Campaign is more visible and increasingly influential when compared to just a few years ago. Given the aggressive push to increase logging in state forests, IFA advocates have redoubled their efforts to slow the 400% increase in logging over the past decade. Hoosiers from all walks of life are speaking out for the protection of Indiana's beloved state forests from growing commercial interests. Through advocacy and education, IFA has begun advancing reforms to forest management policy in Indiana. These reforms have been made possible through the organizing of local, broad-based coalitions contacting their elected officials. IFA's economic studies and Ecoblitz surveys provide forest advocates the research they need to speak to the value of protecting a portion of Indiana's unique forest heritage. After all, Indiana's forests benefit all Hoosiers, from inner-city families to members of the Indiana Academy of Science.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

IFA's Forests for Indy program was launched in spring 2018 to serve as a proactive, collaborative effort to identify and preserve Indianapolis' remaining forests. Experts recommend a 40% to 60% tree canopy for cities within central Indiana's climate zone to reduce urban heat island temperatures and reduce stormwater runoff. To achieve a 40% canopy, we would need–today–to plant 2.4 million trees, each with a 20-foot canopy: a costly proposition. That said, to keep Indianapolis vibrant, green, and livable, we need to conserve much of what forest remains within Marion County.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of media partnerships developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of media articles reflecting preferred issue framing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending rallies or marches

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes Save Crown Hill Woods Marches and rallies

Number of individuals attending coalition meetings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending briefings and presentations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of testimonies offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stakeholders or stakeholder groups who agree to engage

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meetings held with decision makers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Wild Indiana Campaign

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Expand and protect old growth forests on public land.
2. Establish the value of old growth forests through the Ecoblitz and other natural science-based and economic research.
3. Restore and protect significant forest tracts throughout the state and advocate for the establishment of significant portions of wild areas in north and central Indiana that contribute to a north-south corridor of contiguous forest land.
4. Continue to build strength of IFA as an organization.

IFA accomplishes its mission in 5 ways:

1. By utilizing and collaborating with experts and researchers from leading universities and other institutions to document the value of preserving the natural diversity of forests in Indiana.
2. By effectively advocating before the Indiana general assembly, federal, state and local agencies.
3. By reaching out, educating and organizing individuals and groups who share our passion for protecting forests in Indiana.
4. By humanizing the forest issues, articulating the importance and benefits of people being in nature, telling stories about citizens impacted, and leveraging the power of images.
5. By seeking judicial relief, if appropriate, when all other options have been exhausted.

Our Vision:
Through expert research, influential advocacy, effective organizing, powerful storytelling, and when necessary, litigation, the Indiana Forest Alliance will ensure that the integrity of Indiana's forest ecosystem thrives as a natural resource to benefit native wildlife, soil, air and water quality; and as the emblem of our natural heritage. By leading a coalition of citizens, organizations and decision makers, IFA will establish, protect, and restore forests for future generations.

The Indiana Forest Alliance is stronger, more visible and influential today than it was one year ago. The tumultuous 2016 federal, state, and local elections seem to have emboldened logging interests. Clearly, they believed that the outcome of the elections entitled em to aggressively push for privatizing state and national forest lands. Long before 2016, the commercial logging industry in Indiana was seeking to exploit our spectacular state and national forests, as if they were a plantation cash crop.

But we redoubled our efforts. People from all walks of life joined our ranks to become activists, speaking out for the protection of our state forests from commercial interests. We used direct action and education to advance reforms to forest management policy in Indiana. We began organizing broad-based local coalitions of groups and individuals ready to confront political decision makers; and we translated and communicated a timely, well-constructed and easy to understand message. We produced solid information about the value of protecting a portion of our public forests that are rich in biodiversity for improved quality of life and economic gain for local communities. We shared our vision with a variety of groups—from inner-city neighborhoods to the Indiana Academy of Science—engaging the with a multi-pronged strategy to cultivate support for protecting old, native forests that are threatened by development.

Crown Hill Woods

In September 2015, Crown Hill Cemetery sold 14.75 acres of undisturbed, old-growth forest to the National Cemetery Administration (NCA), which is part of the Veterans Administration (VA). The NCA has plans to destroy the only old-growth forest in inner city Indianapolis to build a columbarium for veterans. This is a wonderful project, but it is in the wrong location.

IFA organized a coalition of neighborhood leaders, local businesses, schools, churches and conservation organizations, to save this forest, located in Indianapolis. IFA's organizing resulted in the Mayor of Indianapolis publicly announcing his support for saving Crown Hill Woods in March 2017. In the days that followed, IFA staff and volunteers went door-to-door in the neighborhoods surrounding Crown Hill Woods, and more than 500 people contacted the Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary, David Shulkin, demanding that the VA consider alternative locations for their Veterans Columbaria Project. On March 13, the VA publicly announced that it was halting the project to examine possible solutions to the public's concerns.

This reprieve has inspired and energized a new, diverse group of urban dwellers to take action to preserve, protect and promote wild forests in our cities, and to recognize and defend their rights to demand that our larger state forests also have areas protected from commercial logging and other destructive activities.

Financials

INDIANA FOREST ALLIANCE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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INDIANA FOREST ALLIANCE INC

Board of directors
as of 08/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Elizabeth Mahoney

EM Design

Term: 2016 - 2020

Elizabeth Mahoney

EM Design

David Haberman

Indiana University

Curt Mayfield

IBEW

Angelo Dattilo

A.D. Environmental

Janet Hollis

Retired Educator

Jeff Marks

Retired

Dave Seastrom

Radio personality

Liz Pinnick

Self-Employed

Todd Stewart

Self-Employed

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No