FRESHFARM MARKETS INC

Nourishing Our Food Future

aka FRESHFARM   |   Washington, DC   |  www.freshfarm.org

Mission

FRESHFARM is a nonprofit that promotes sustainable agriculture and improves food access and equity in the Mid-Atlantic region. We operate producer-only farmers markets that provide vital economic opportunities to local farmers and food producers, pioneering food distribution programs that increase food access for low-income families, and innovative food education programs that build healthier communities.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Mr. Hugo Mogollon

Main address

655 New York Avenue NW WeWork 6th Fl

Washington, DC 20001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-2169859

NTEE code info

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

Urban, Community (S31)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The current food system is not equitable for all. Financial wellness is a critical determinant of an individual’s or family’s ability to provide for a healthy diet and exert personal agency over their health outcomes. Poverty inhibits not only an individual’s ability to afford nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables, but also in his or her ability to pay for transportation and convenience to access fresh food at a grocery store. The food system can also be punishing for small-scale local farmers who run on very slim margins when selling to grocery stores. The problems FRESHFARM is currently working to address include: -People can’t afford healthy, local food -People can't access health, local food -Without healthy, local food, people are more likely to develop chronic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes etc. -People may not know how to prepare/cook, or develop a preference for healthy food -Farmers struggle to make a living

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

FoodPrints

FRESHFARM FoodPrints improves health and education
outcomes in partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools. By integrating gardening, harvesting, cooking, and nutritious eating at partner schools, FoodPrints:
1) Increases knowledge about and consumption of seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables.
2) Develops preferences for nutritious foods.
3) Builds students’ and families’ skills and confidence to
prepare nutritious recipes.
4) Involves students and families in cooperative cooking and urban gardening, and teaches where food comes from.
5) Engages students in real-world applications of math,
science, reading, writing, social studies, and health curricula.
6) Makes connections between school gardens, classrooms, and school cafeterias.
7) Promotes food purchasing decisions that are
environmentally and economically sustainable.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

1) The Pop Up Food Hub (PUFH) program leverages farmers markets to deliver fresh, nutritious food to underserved communities. We place wholesale orders with our participating farmers, pick up the order at markets, and deliver the produce to wholesale customers, transforming the farmers market into a platform to connect local producers to new and nontraditional wholesale opportunities.

Food Hub customers include 52 organizations that reachmore than 1,250 toddlers, 250 seniors, and 100 low-income families.

2) Through the PUFH we run the Market Share: a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program that increases healthy, local food access to low-income communities by delivering weekly bags of healthy, local produce to convenient pick-up sites subsidized for people receiving SNAP, WIC, and senior benefits at a 75%-90% discount.

In 2019 we distributed 7,000 Market Share bags resulting in $50,000 of savings for low-income residents.

3) PUFH Farm Stands create new points of sale where community residents sell fresh and healthy food on behalf of local farmers in under-served and out-of-reach neighborhoods. This creates new retail access, jobs, and trust in the community while increasing revenue for local farmers to make the whole market a success. In 2019, the Farm stands generated $38,208‬ in new revenue for local farmers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

With a network of over 240 farmers and producers from across the Mid-Atlantic, we’re working to support the economic sustainability of small-scale farming. We assist our farmers and producers in accessing resources to help them grow their businesses and develop skills necessary to continue farming and coming to market year after year.

Population(s) Served
Farmers

1) FRESHFARM operates more than 30 farmers markets across the DC area, representing 240 farmers and food producers from the Mid-Atlantic who collectively earn over $15 million in revenue at market annually. Our markets are strictly producer-only, and prioritize local sourcing. Farmers must operate within a 200 mile radius of DC, and producers must source the majority of their ingredients from local farms.

2) The Fresh Match program matches what shoppers spend at market when they use their federal nutrition benefits, empowering low-income residents to buy local produce while providing additional revenue for local farmers and food producers.

In 2019, we matched $130,000 in food benefits for our neighbors in need to spend on fresh foods at farmers markets.

3) At every FRESHFARM Market, we identify a nonprofit organization that needs fresh healthy food to provide to low-income families or to homeless shelters. At the end of each market day, our farmers donate to the gleaning partner which then uses the food in making meals for homeless shelters or in job training programs for food service.

Every year, we donate over 50,000 pounds of fresh food to our nonprofit partners that include organizations like DC Central Kitchen, Miriam's Kitchen, Shepherd's Table, THRIVE DC, First Church of Christ Holiness, and Arlington Food Assistance Center.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Momentum Award for the Penn Quarter FRESHFARM Market to Bernadine Prince and Ann Yonkers 2005

Downtown DC Business Improvement District

Women Who Inspire Award to Bernadine Prince and Ann Yonkers 2006

Women Chefs & Restaurateurs

Hometown Heroes Award to Bernadine Prince and Ann Yonkers 2008

WETA Public Television

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of unique individual donors that have given to FRESHFARM.

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

FoodPrints

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FRESHFARM's FoodPrints education programming is taught at schools in Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. We plan to continue expanding in the future as the program has the capacity.

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Average donation amount from new donors. As of 7/1 this number is $124.55 for 2020. 2019 saw a greater number of new donors, but a smaller donation amount. Excludes event donations.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Students

Related Program

FoodPrints

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of DC Public School students taking FoodPrints classes throughout the school year. Pandemic decreased our numbers in 2020 because there was no in-person learning.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of donors making their first gift to FRESHFARM each year.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FRESHFARM has seen an increase of grants awarded over the past 4 years. As of 7/1/20 we have been awarded 28 grants.

Number of farmers given information about key markets

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Farmers

Related Program

Farmers Markets

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of farmers and producers within FRESHFARM's network. This number dipped in 2020 due to some markets closing during the pandemic.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

FRESHFARM is a nonprofit that promotes sustainable agriculture and improves food access and equity in the Mid-Atlantic region. We operate producer-only farmers markets that provide vital economic opportunities to local farmers and food producers, pioneering food distribution programs that increase food access for low-income families, and innovative food education programs that build healthier communities.

Our work is guided by three primary goals:

Strengthen our food economy through market-based solutions

FRESHFARM is the third-largest farmers market organization in the country. Our 27 markets draw nearly 250 farmers and food producers from across the Mid-Atlantic, who collectively earn over $16 million in revenue at market annually. The Fresh Match program provides matching dollar-for-dollar incentives to shoppers who spend at market with federal nutrition benefits, empowering low-income residents to buy local produce while providing additional revenue for local farmers and food producers.

Empower the next generation of eaters through education

Our innovative FoodPrints program provides comprehensive food education for more than 5,800 students in 15 DC Public Schools. Students grow, harvest, cook, and enjoy seasonal produce in hands-on lessons aligned to academic content. As a result, students are more familiar with and willing to eat nutritious foods and they look forward to FoodPrints at their “favorite day at school.”

Promote resilience through innovative programming

The pioneering Pop Up Food Hub program leverages farmers markets to purchase, sort, pack, and deliver fresh, nutritious food to individuals and institutions in high-need areas. The Pop Up Food Hub serves 68 community institutions, reaching over 900 seniors and families. The Hub also operates the Market Share, a weekly subscription program that provides a bag of fresh fruits and vegetables to low-income residents at 50-75% off retail cost.

Strengthening our food economy through market-based solutions

Farmers Markets: We manage and operate 27 farmers markets in the DC Area. Our markets serve as a central gathering place for 240 farmers and food producers in the Mid-Atlantic region to connect with urban customers. With over 500,000 shoppers annually, our markets connect farmers to an urban core, thus driving increased revenue and promoting the viability of their businesses.

Fresh Match: Fresh Match doubles the buying power of federal nutrition benefit shoppers (SNAP, WIC, SFMNP) up to $10 per market, per day. Benefit shoppers turn in their federal assistance checks to the market booth in exchange for Fresh Match coupons to do their shopping. This empowers low-income populations to provide their households with high-quality local produce from market.

Farmer Support: With funding from the Farmers Market Promotion Program, we launched a pilot program for farmers to teach them how to effectively promote their brand, and implement sustainable business and agricultural practices. Applying sustainable agricultural practices often save thousands in expenses and increase the return on crop yield.

Empowering the next generation of eaters through education

FoodPrints: The FoodPrints program improves health and education outcomes for children by integrating gardening, harvesting, cooking, and nutritious eating at DC partner schools. In FoodPrints classrooms, students increase knowledge about and consumption of seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables, develop preferences for nutritious foods, and build skills and confidence to prepare nutritious recipes. The families of FoodPrints students are invited into the classroom to volunteer and learn along with their children, effectively giving them the knowledge and ability to prepare these healthy recipes at home, thus reinforcing healthy eating habits.

Market Education: We offer cooking demonstrations conducted by market managers and local chefs at our markets where shoppers learn how to prepare a healthy recipe using ingredients sourced locally from the market. These demonstrations give shoppers the confidence to replicate these recipes at home.

Promoting resilience through innovative programming

Pop Up Food Hub: The Pop Up Food Hub (PUFH) leverages farmers markets to deliver fresh, nutritious food to underserved communities. We aggregate demand from small institutions and facilitate the orders with our local farmers. When the farmers come to the market, we sort and pack these into orders that then get delivered to convenient community pick-up locations such as childcare facilities, recreation centers, WIC and health clinics, and teaching gardens.

Market Share: The Market Share is a local food subscription program open to anyone and everyone. Shares are packed with fresh fruits and vegetables from our market vendors that expose shoppers to a variety of produce, as the shares are curated by seasonality to give a taste of the growing season.

Over 20 Years of Experience

FRESHFARM has been operating producer-only farmers markets since 1997, growing from 15 farmers and producers to a network of over 240 today.

Key Regional Leader in the Mid-Atlantic

In 2019, FRESHFARM merged with Community Foodworks to become the largest market organization in the Mid-Atlantic region, and third largest in the country. The combined organization employs a total of over 60 staff and oversees 27 markets across the metro area. The merger presents a unique opportunity to make market operations more efficient and better serve the needs of small farmers and communities. It will also ensure enhanced organizational capacity to strengthen current and future partnerships.

Visionary Leadership

FRESHFARM’s Executive Director, Hugo Mogollon, is widely recognized in the regional food movement as a visionary leader. He is one of three recipients of the 2019 Excellence in Chief Executive Leadership (EXCEL) Award from the Center for Nonprofit Advancement, which recognizes and spotlights outstanding chief executives among nonprofits in the Washington region. He brings extensive leadership in food systems work to FRESHFARM, having served as the Executive Director of Community Foodworks.

Innovative Staff

Jennifer Mampara: FoodPrints is managed by the Director of Education and 20-year veteran food and garden educator, Jennifer Mampara. Under her direction, FoodPrints has grown from one school and one staff member to 15 schools across the city and 25 staff members in just over a decade.

Dalila Boclin: Dalila Boclin oversees program innovation and implementation to make choosing local food a more accessible, dynamic, and resilient option for individuals and institutions in the DMV. She designed and implemented the new model for local food distribution coined the 'Pop-Up Food Hub.' The Hub uses farmers markets in place of traditional warehousing infrastructure to facilitate wholesale distribution and Market Share to institutions and families.

Strengthening our food economy through market-based solutions

What we’ve accomplished

In 2019, FRESHFARM operated 27 farmers markets across the DC area, representing 240 farmers and producers, earning a collective $16 million in revenue. The Fresh Match program distributed $122,445 in matching dollars for SNAP, WIC, and SFMNP shoppers. By merging with Community Foodworks, FRESHFARM is now the largest farmers market organization in the region.

Vision for the future

We will train a cohort of 8-10 new and emerging farmers in our network to help them develop marketing and business skills to increase their visibility, as well as adopt sustainable agricultural practices that will decrease expenses. We will enlist the help of successful, retired farmers that were previously in our network to serve as mentors for these new farmers.

Empowering the next generation of eaters through education

What we’ve accomplished

In 2019, FoodPrints expanded to two schools in Wards 7 and 8, the highest-need areas with limited access to healthy, fresh food. In the 2019-20 school year, FoodPrints reached 5,800 students in 15 schools for a total of 1,800 classes and 100 unique lesson plans, and engaged 800 parents and volunteers.

School Meals Partnership
In partnership with DCPS and Wellness in the Schools (WITS), FRESHFARM introduced “Class to Cafe,” where school cafeteria teams are trained to scratch-cook FoodPrints recipes and serve them each week at 10 partner schools. Students consumed, on average, 42% more of the portion size of the FoodPrints meal than students attending schools without this programming.

Vision for the future

FoodPrints as a regional leader
FoodPrints can serve as a framework for impactful, sustainable, school-based food education. We will provide professional development workshops for teachers and school districts outside our network, who are interested in adopting our program model and using the FoodPrints curriculum.

Promoting resilience through innovative programming

What we’ve accomplished

Last year, the Pop Up Food Hub delivered fresh, nutritious food to 68 local organizations, reaching more than 1,250 toddlers, 250 seniors, and 100 low-income families. The program distributed over 7,100 bags of produce, resulting in over $45,000 in savings for customers, over $237,000 in revenue for farmers, and has brought food to areas that are mired by food deserts.

Vision for the future

Farm-to-Childcare
In 2019, we delivered fresh, local produce to 37 childcare centers serving over 1,200 toddlers. We are developing our partnerships and improving evaluation methods so that we can work toward making farm-to-childcare universal in DC.

Farm-to-Healthcare
FRESHFARM recently applied for funding to provide weekly fresh produce to WIC participants over 35 weeks. We will explore opportunities to partner with insurance and healthcare providers to expand the intervention, improve health outcomes and food security, and drive down healthcare costs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    FRESHFARM’s target populations are low-income children, families, and seniors in the Washington, DC metro area. We implement innovative farmers market-based solutions that make local food affordable, and bring that food directly to underserved areas. Our food education program enables our target population to make informed decisions about what they eat, and why it is important to maintain a diet of fresh produce. The FoodPrints program directly reaches 5,700 DC Public Schools students and their families with garden and nutrition education programming. We also serve a network of over 250 farmers and producers from the Mid-Atlantic region by operating nearly 30 markets where they can sell directly to the consumer and generate revenue streams that help their businesses grow.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Unobtrusive observation, learning assessments, client testimonials,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, We don't actively use collected feedback, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    To increase food access in underserved areas of the city, FRESHFARM piloted a project that provided transportation to a centralized market in Ward 7. Due to low participation in the program, we surveyed the community and found that residents preferred easy access to convenient spaces in their neighborhoods instead of being transported to another area of the city. In response to this feedback, we created the Farm Stand model, which brings local fruits and vegetables to more areas of Ward 7. With input from the community on the best locations for this program, we established 2 farm stands at Cesar Chavez Public School and the Kenilworth Recreation Center. Both stands source their produce from one of our nearby markets, and bring fresh food directly to underserved DC residents.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our FoodPrints program works closely with school administrators, classroom teachers, and PTA leadership at each partner school to implement an individualized program model that best meets that particular school’s needs. We meet continuously throughout each school year to assess implementation and outcomes, and adjust programming as we go based on stakeholder input. FoodPrints also contracts an evaluator who collects information from students on their families through surveys, observation, and focus groups which directly impacts the composition of the program curriculum. The Pop Up Food Hub program benefits from a partnership with the DC Farm-to-Childcare Coalition, which is comprised of local farmers and childcare providers, whose feedback impact decision-making and improve operations.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

FRESHFARM MARKETS INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FRESHFARM MARKETS INC

Board of directors
as of 4/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Sam Fromartz

FERN


Board co-chair

Jessica Zetzman

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Robin Burton

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Jennifer Cartland

Special Olympics

Mary Conroy

US Office of Management & Budget

Shannon Cummings

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Daniel Rodden

KPMG LLP

Phyllis English

Versant Health

Sam Fromartz

FERN

Anne Gerson

The Pew Charitable Trusts

Jack Healy

Retired, United Way

James Huang

Unity Health Care

Mike Kohn

Patrick J. McGovern Foundation

Deandra Jackson

Nature Conservancy

Ris Lacoste

Ris

James McWhorter

Coastal Sunbelt Produce, The Market at River Falls

Jose Morales

Keany Produce Co.

Lisa Renstrom

Philanthropist

Eric Rice

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Caitlin Roberts

Number 1 Sons

Lina Salazar

Self-Employed

Charlotte Young

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Jessica Zetzman

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Jeffrey Zubricki

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Francess Taylor

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/25/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.