COMMUNITY COUNCIL

Walla Walla, WA   |  www.wwcommunitycouncil.org

Mission

Community Council fosters a trusted gathering place where people engage in dialogue, inquiry, and advocacy to build a vibrant region for everyone. Community Council's region includes Walla Walla and Columbia counties, Washington, and northeastern Umatilla County, Oregon with the City of Walla Walla, Washington representing the largest population center.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Mary A. Campbell

Main address

PO Box 2936

Walla Walla, WA 99362 USA

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EIN

35-2327775

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education as a Path to Economic Growth

This study was completed in 2016 and community members have been advocating for the recommendations in that report since 2016. One of the outcomes of that study was the creation of an Educational Attainment Alliance (EAA), which is a regional partnership that seeks to increase educational attainment by eliminating barriers to success and building better alignment across the education continuum in our region. Community Council staff and volunteers have continued to work with United Way staff to support the work of the EAA. Over the past year the EAA has worked on building institutional capacity, community outreach, and developing working groups around priority areas.

The EAA worked with consultants to develop a brand identity that captures the essence of the initiative in a recognizable logo, and craft a meaningful tagline. As a result, the EAA is now known as Elevate, and the tagline is: Building Strong Communities Through Education. The partnership also crafted a set of values statements that will be used to guide its work. The values statement, logo and tagline all compliment the EAA’s vision of change and framework for action, which was developed earlier.

Prior to the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year, Elevate hosted a series of virtual Community Roundtable events designed to provide community members with up-to-date information in preparation for the new school year within the context of the pandemic. Virtual Roundtable events were hosted in College Place and Walla Walla; Dayton and Waitsburg; Milton-Freewater; and Touchet; and featured speakers from education, government, childcare, business, mental health, and public health. The events provided a forum for leaders from each sector to convey critical information and a venue for community members to ask questions, and set a foundation for collaborative problem solving. One outcome of the roundtable events was a successful grant application to the Washington State Department of Commerce for a study of childcare needs in our region.

In early 2020, Elevate identified family and community engagement at the middle school level as its first priority area. The Elevate partners agreed that strong family and community engagement is key to student success, and that providing middle schoolers more opportunities can increase student engagement. Elevate has assembled a Middle School Working Group, which will launch in 2021 and will work on devising strategies for increasing middle school family and community engagement.

Elevate is also convening a second working group to develop an Equity Fellows program. The purpose of the Equity Fellows program is to build institutional capacity around equity from pre-k through postsecondary. The working group, which will begin meeting in 2021, will develop a program framework that meets the needs of the various educational institutions in our region, with an eye to launching the Equity Fellows program in the fall of 2021.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Children and youth
Work status and occupations
Social and economic status

Community Council continues to facilitate the work of the Affordable Housing Implementation Task Force (ITF) as it advocates for the implementation of the recommendations from the Affordable Housing Study Report.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis, the ITF pivoted to address immediate housing needs within our community, while at the same time continuing to work on the long-term goals established through the study. In coordination with other state and national housing advocacy groups, the ITF is paying close attention to state and federal policy issues as they related to housing within the context of the COVID crisis. The subcommittee wrote and submitted a number of letters to state and federal representatives, advocating for immediate housing relief in relation to the COVID-19 crisis, such as extensions to eviction moratoria and the establishment of emergency rental assistance to keep low-income renters stably housed during the pandemic. The ITF produced and continually updates and distributes its English-language and Spanish-language COVID-19 Housing & Utility Relief Information Sheet, which briefly explains state, federal, and regional relief measures that have been enacted in response to the pandemic to protect residents from eviction, foreclosure, and displacement.

Other highlights of the Implementation Task Force’s work include:
● Advocacy for manufactured housing park residents’ opportunity to purchase legislation in Washington State. The compilation of a packet of resources for manufactured housing park owners, informing them about the opportunity to sell to resident-owned cooperatives in the event that they want to sell their parks. The production of a report to local governments on local policies that can be adopted to help preserve manufactured housing communities and protect the residents within them.
● The development of a multi-media public awareness campaign on the benefits of affordable housing for our community. This included publishing articles in local newspapers, developing social media posts on affordable housing facts, and producing a short video on our region’s affordable housing crisis.
● The preliminary development and graphing of affordable housing measurements for our region, such as the number of affordable homes available to households per income bracket.
● Learning from multi-jurisdictional affordable housing coalitions from other regions, as the ITF considered how to form a lasting coalition that can advance affordable housing priorities in our region.

The ITF is doing the preliminary work necessary to establish our region’s first community land trust, which will be called Common Roots Housing Trust. A Community Land Trust (CLT) is a nonprofit organization that owns land and develops housing for the purpose of creating permanently affordable homes. Homes on CLT land are owned or rented by households, and the land, which is owned by the CLT, is leased to the residents for a modest fee. CLTs also provide financial services, such as counseling and access to lenders, to support their residents so as to prevent foreclosure. Common Roots Housing Trust, will acquire land on which to develop a portfolio of affordable homes to meet the specific needs of residents of our region. It will create lasting home ownership opportunities for community members who have steady incomes but cannot afford to buy safe, market-rate homes in our region. The ITF chose the name “Common Roots” for the CLT, and developed Common Roots’ mission, vision, and values statements. In the fall of 2020, Common Roots hired a nationally recognized CLT consultant to assist with market, pricing, and subsidy analysis; and develop Common Roots’ logo and website. In January 2021, the ITF hosted a virtual town hall, introducing Common Roots to the region.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Social and economic status

We regularly engage the community in developing a community road map - reflecting on where we have been, where we are now, where we want to go and what critical ares need attention if we are to get there.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Financials

COMMUNITY COUNCIL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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COMMUNITY COUNCIL

Board of directors
as of 11/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mario Delgadillo

Baker Boyer Bank

Term: 2020 - 2021

Ben Currin

Mario Delgadillo

Baker Boyer Bank

Kim Rolfe

Whitman College

Ynez Vargas

Profesionales Bilingues

Jessica Cook

Walla Walla Community College

Katie DePonty

Blue Zones Project Walla Wallaalla Walla

Meagan Hayes

City of Dayton

Norma Hernandez

City of College Place

E. David Lopez

Walla Walla University

Tony McGuire

Walla Walla Community College / Community Resilience Initiative

Rodney Outlaw

Walla Walla Music Organization

Julie Perron

Walla Walla Public Schools

Laura Prado

PARC Resources

Gustavo Reyna

Intel

Kelly Trop

YMCA

Yesenia Trujillo

InterMountain Education Service District

Andrea Weckmueller-Behringer

Walla Walla Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization

Jim Wilson

Kathryn Witherington

Downtown Walla Walla Foundation

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.