PLATINUM2023

HOPE FOR A VILLAGE

Love is best shown in action like Christ!

Hollister, MO   |  https://hopeforavillage.org/

Mission

"Hope for a Village" is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization with a Christ-led mission, operating under the umbrella of New Beginnings Fellowship Church in Hollister, Missouri. Our primary focus is on improving lives in the village of Cotes-de-Fer, Haiti, where we are deeply committed to making a positive impact. Our Mission: At "Hope for a Village," our mission is twofold: to alleviate suffering within vulnerable groups, specifically the elderly and handicapped members of the community, and to empower young individuals through education. We firmly believe that education is the key to breaking the cycle of poverty. By supporting the education of young people, we enable them to become self-sustained individuals who, in turn, contribute meaningfully back to their community.

Ruling year info

2022

President

Mystraine Onoh

Main address

PO Box 534 C/O New Beginnings Fellowship Church

Hollister, MO 65673 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-2771980

NTEE code info

Public Foundations (T30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grandma Martha Hygiene Kits for Girls

Grandma Martha Hygiene Kits for Girls was created by Missy Onoh and Martha Taylor in June of 2020. As a native of Cotes-de-Fer, Haiti, Missy our founder knows very well how difficult it is to have menstruation supplies needed to use every month. Martha Taylor is not a stranger to Missy's native land. When they started a project to sew mask for the Branson community during the start of the pandemic, they had a lot of time to chat. Grandma Martha asked Missy what girls use and how do girls have access to menstruation pads on a regular basis knowing how it is in the Northen area where she visited back in the 1980s. She was stunned to learn that not much has changed in the remote villages in Haiti like Cotes-de-Fer. We are Getting ready to start sewing kits for Grandma Martha's Hygiene Kits for Girls Project. Our goal for 2023 / 2024 is to introduce this project to four new schools. 2 schools in the fall and 2 more in the spring at the start of the new school year in Cotes-de-Fer, Haiti

Population(s) Served
Adolescent girls
Adolescent boys
Non-adult children


We currently have 90 elderly on this program.

So far, we have delivered 14,040 jugs of water which amounts to 70,200 gallons of clean drinking water delivered for those who don’t have access to clean water and are not able to physically leave their homes to get water. Which means our team have made 312 trips to their homes.
Doing this does not only provide water to those who desperately need this service, but it allows us to check on them, visit with them, converse with them, talk about God’s blessings. It allows us to be there for them in the event of an emergency.

WHY?

Because NO ONE DESERVES TO DIE ALONE!

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Potable Water for the Elderly and Physically Handicapped!

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Grandma Martha Hygiene Kits for Girls

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community-based organizations providing primary prevention services in chronic disease programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Potable Water for the Elderly and Physically Handicapped!

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hope For A Village Goals:
Hope For A Village Goals:

Empowering Education: Our primary goal is to reduce school absences among girls aged 10 to 18 in Cotes-de-Fer and surrounding areas. We aim to provide comprehensive health, hygiene, and puberty education within the school system, ensuring every girl has the knowledge and resources needed to thrive.
Hygienic Facilities: We strive to provide every school child and teacher with access to clean and private restrooms equipped with running water. By improving hygiene facilities, we aim to reduce illnesses associated with inadequate sanitation, fostering a healthier learning environment.
Integrated Health Education: Our vision includes integrating school-based health education permanently into the curriculum. By embedding health awareness in education, we aim to create a lasting impact on the well-being of the community, ensuring generations to come are well-informed about health and hygiene.
Accessible Clean Water: We are dedicated to ensuring that elderly individuals and the physically disabled, who lack access, receive clean drinking water directly in their homes. By addressing this basic need, we aim to enhance the quality of life for vulnerable members of the community.
Health and Well-being: Our overarching goal is to reduce the prevalence of preventable diseases such as strokes, dysentery, hunger, malnutrition, and support physically disabled individuals in the villages. Through education, healthcare, and community support, we aim to create a healthier, more resilient community, where everyone has the opportunity to lead a fulfilling life.
These goals reflect our commitment to fostering education, health, and well-being within the community, aiming for sustainable change and empowering individuals to lead healthier, more prosperous lives.

1. Menstrual Health Education:

a. Needs Assessment: Conduct a comprehensive needs assessment to understand the specific challenges faced by female students in the target schools. This includes assessing their access to menstrual products, understanding cultural norms, and identifying barriers to attendance.

b. Curriculum Development: Develop a tailored health education curriculum that addresses menstrual health, hygiene, and related topics. Collaborate with local educators, healthcare professionals, and community members to ensure cultural sensitivity and relevance.

c. Partnership Building: Establish partnerships with local schools, teachers, and parents to gain support and access to students. Engage the school community in the importance of menstrual health education and its role in improving attendance rates.

d. Hygiene Kit Distribution: Secure funding and resources for hygiene kits containing washable menstrual pads and other essentials. Develop a distribution plan to ensure kits reach the target students efficiently.

e. Monitoring and Evaluation: Implement a robust monitoring and evaluation system to track the impact of the program. Collect data on attendance rates, menstrual product usage, and changes in knowledge and behavior among students. Use this data to continuously refine the program.

2. Overcoming Infrastructure Challenges:

a. Identify Key Partners: Collaborate with international organizations, NGOs, and local businesses that specialize in infrastructure development and sanitation. Seek their expertise and support in addressing the infrastructure challenges faced by schools in rural Haiti.

b. Fundraising and Grant Writing: Develop a dedicated fundraising and grant-writing team to secure funding for infrastructure projects. Identify potential donors and grant opportunities that align with your mission. Emphasize the impact that improved infrastructure will have on education and community health.

c. Advocacy and Awareness: Raise awareness about the critical need for proper infrastructure in schools. Engage with local and national government officials, as well as the media, to advocate for policy changes and increased investment in school facilities.

d. Community Involvement: Mobilize the local community, including parents, teachers, and students, to actively participate in the improvement of school infrastructure. Organize community-driven initiatives and fundraising events to generate support.

e. Long-Term Planning: Develop a comprehensive, long-term infrastructure improvement plan that outlines specific projects, timelines, and budgets. Prioritize projects based on urgency and impact, and regularly update the plan as new opportunities arise.

3. Providing Clean Drinking Water for the Elderly:

a. Sustainable Funding: Establish a sustainable funding model for the clean drinking water program. Seek long-term partnerships with local businesses, donors, and philanthropic organizations dedicated to community health and well-bei

3. Continued…
3. Providing Clean Drinking Water for the Elderly:

a. Sustainable Funding: Establish a sustainable funding model for the clean drinking water program. Seek long-term partnerships with local businesses, donors, and philanthropic organizations dedicated to community health and well-being.

b. Volunteer Engagement: Recruit and train volunteers from the local community to assist with the weekly delivery and maintenance of water jugs. Create a reliable volunteer network to ensure the program's continuity.

c. Awareness Campaigns: Raise awareness about the clean drinking water program's impact on the elderly and disabled population. Share success stories, testimonials, and data on improved health outcomes to attract more support and donations.

d. Scaling Up: Explore opportunities to expand the program to reach more elderly and disabled individuals in need. Assess the feasibility of increasing the number of beneficiaries and securing additional resources.

e. Collaborative Efforts: Collaborate with local healthcare providers to offer health check-ups and support services to the elderly beneficiaries, addressing their holistic well-being.

By implementing these strategies, Hope For A Village can continue its mission to create a positive impact on education, health, and community development, ultimately improving the lives of those it serves in rural Haiti.

Strategy # 5 continued
Meeting Healthcare Needs:

1. Nursing Staff:
In response to observed medical needs, we hired dedicated home health nurses in 2021 and expanded the team further in 2023. These skilled professionals conduct regular assessments, offer medical attention, and provide vital nursing care to the elderly and disabled in Cotes-de-Fer. The addition of qualified nursing staff significantly improved the overall health and well-being of our beneficiaries.

2. Medical Collaboration:
We established a valuable partnership with a local clinic doctor who remains on call based on the nursing assessments. This collaboration ensures immediate medical attention when necessary, creating a timely and responsive healthcare support system for the elderly.

3. Health Data Monitoring:
Our organization maintains meticulous records of vital signs and health metrics over a span of two years. This data-driven approach allows us to monitor the health progress of beneficiaries, providing valuable insights into the impact of our clean water program on reducing diseases and mortality rates.

Challenges and Needs:

While our organization possesses the expertise and qualified staff to address the healthcare needs of the elderly, our primary challenge lies in funding. Despite making significant strides, we currently serve only approximately 15% of the clean water needs in the community. To continue and expand this essential program, we require additional financial support. The availability of funds would enable us to hire more nursing staff, extend medical support, and ultimately impr

Community Integration and Success:
Hope For A Village has achieved a 100% success rate in the communities it serves, attributed to deep integration and careful team selection. Being founded by a native Haitian and having a team chosen meticulously, the organization has established strong bonds with the community. With numerous qualified individuals ready to join, the organization is poised for a more extensive impact when funding becomes available.

Addressing Malnutrition and Food Insecurity:
Recognizing the pressing issue of malnutrition among the elderly, the organization aims to implement a feeding program. This initiative will not only provide nutritious meals but also support local farmers, making food more accessible. Currently, 90% of beneficiaries struggle to have one balanced meal per week, highlighting the dire need for immediate intervention.

Life-Sustaining Clean Drinking Water Initiative:
Hope For A Village initiated its efforts with a life-sustaining clean drinking water program, recognizing its immediate impact on community health. By providing clean water, the organization tackled a fundamental need, ensuring the well-being of the community. This foundational step laid the groundwork for further impactful interventions.

Addressing Energy Needs at Bishop Joseph Sullivan Hospital:
The organization identified critical energy challenges at Bishop Joseph Sullivan Hospital and aims to implement a solar system. The hospital, currently reliant on diesel fuel, faces challenges during fuel shortages, leading to preventable deaths. By transitioning to sustainable and affordable clean energy, the organization strives to ensure uninterrupted healthcare services for the community, addressing a vital aspect of public health infrastructure.

Hope For A Village's holistic approach, focusing on immediate needs such as clean drinking water and healthcare, showcases its commitment to community well-being. The organization's vision of sustainable solutions, community engagement, and targeted interventions demonstrates its dedication to creating a lasting impact in the lives of the people it serves.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

HOPE FOR A VILLAGE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HOPE FOR A VILLAGE

Board of directors
as of 10/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mystraine Onoh

Hope For A Village

Term: 2024 - 2022

Jonathan Onoh

Financial Analyst

Mystraine Onoh

President / Founder

Crystal Lathim

Secretary

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/5/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/04/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.