ASSOCIATION HOUSE OF CHICAGO

CHICAGO, IL   |  www.associationhouse.org

Mission

We serve a multi-cultural community by providing comprehensive, collaborative and effective programs in English and Spanish. We promote health and wellness and create opportunities for educational and economic advancement.

Ruling year info

1961

President & CEO

Mr. Juan Carlos Linares

Vice President

Mrs. Julie Rodriguez

Main address

1116 N KEDZIE AVE

CHICAGO, IL 60651 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2166961

NTEE code info

Neighborhood Center, Settlement House (P28)

Community Mental Health Center (F32)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Association House fills the systemic gaps left by institutions that exclude Chicago's multicultural individuals and families in need. We develop evidence-based, trauma-informed programs in mental and behavioral healthcare, education, and workforce development. And we provide a coordinated, wrap-around service model for participants to address complex needs and improve their lives. Association House began in 1899 as one of the city's original settlement houses. At that time, our participants were mostly central European - and in need of education, training, and social services to help them adapt to life in a new country. We provided services that the city and State did not, and offered programs to improve our community's access and opportunity for participation in Chicago. Changing over the years, our participant community is still diverse - for many decades now mostly Latinx and African American - and demonstrate critical economic, health, and educational needs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Healthy Lifestyles Program

Our Healthy Lifestyles Program (HLP) educates youths, their parents, and members of the greater West Side communities that we serve on health and nutrition. We make factual health and nutrition information accessible to encourage long-term, independent healthy decision making through health, nutrition and cooking classes, and physical fitness activities. We also host an annual Back 2 School Fair in August for hundreds of children and families. We are certified to teach evidence-based Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) and Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) trainings.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Older adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2013

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2021

Awards

AmeriCorps Team of the Year 2013

National Council de la Raza

AmeriCorps Team of the Year 2014

National Council de la Raza

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, People of Latin American descent, Unemployed people, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric applies to participants graduating from our intensive, 8-week Financial Careers Training program.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Older adults, Adolescents

Related Program

Healthy Lifestyles Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our program's staff are certified mental health first aid trainers for youths and adults. Each year, our health trainings prepare nearly 1,000 attendees to identify and support mental health crises.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We attribute the latest year's income change decline with market volatility in the financial services employment sector - especially given operational changes due to COVID-19.

Number of students who demonstrate improved overall literacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Outcome data is represented as percentages (%).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to serve a multicultural community, and to promote health and wellness and create opportunities for educational and economic advancement. At the heart of this mission is our focus on improving quality of life for the individual. To this end, Association House’s goals are:

(1) To build participants’ competitive skills and increase their self-sufficiency.
(2) To design professional services and programs that are aligned with both community need and external opportunity.

Our one-on-one case management teams partner with individual participants to determine both their immediate needs and long-term goals. Many of our participants have a predominant economic, mental health, or educational need and/or aspiration. Through our process, we find that fully 20% of our participant community actively utilizes services in multiple areas. This level of complex and coordinated engagement leads our participants to higher levels of success.

Association House undergoes a rigorous evaluation through a national accreditation body - Council on Accreditation (COA) - every four years. As an accredited organization, our programs and services are ensured to maintain the highest ethical and operational standards in pursuance of our mission.

We also operate with internal controls that are integrated into all of our programs and service delivery and outcomes. Our Performance & Quality Improvement department implements a cycle of continuous evaluation and program planning. Through this engagement, our programs concept program design, establish measurable outcomes, identify and respond to challenges, and critically reflect on achievements and issues to plan for programmatic planning.

To best dignify and respect everyone that we serve and to meet the ever-changing needs of our community, we commit to diversity, equity, and inclusion. We maintain individualized plans to serve individuals who are Limited-English Proficient (LEP) or with hearing, vision, and speech disabilities. We prioritize the recruitment of staff who reflect the service population: where 1) 77% identify as Latinx or African American, 2) are bilingual, and 3) represent our participant community (e.g. live with mental health issues).

Each year, Association House reports on the impact of all our programs and services. Below is a snapshot of just some of our participant gains and programmatic achievements from our coordinated, wrap-around service model in 2020:

Directly served 4,323 participants through 30+ programs. High School - 55 students graduated and earned a high school diploma; 20 children of parenting students provided childcare and education. Behavioral Health - 400 participants received substance abuse treatment; 97% of BH participants avoided psychiatric hospitalization. Child Welfare - 135 children in foster care were placed in safe and nurturing homes. Community Health and Workforce Development - 46 financial careers training participants were placed in employment; 2,639 emergency food packages were distributed to families (a 19.6% increase across a 3-year average); $69,664 in approved public benefits support individuals with basic financial needs.

Financials

ASSOCIATION HOUSE OF CHICAGO
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ASSOCIATION HOUSE OF CHICAGO

Board of directors
as of 2/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Tadd Ingles

Ernst & Young

Term: 2021 - 2022

Tadd Ingles

Ernst & Young LLP

Cynthia Ullrich

Retired Banker

Ronald Kurz

Lone Mountain Investors

Paul Metzger

Retired Tax Attorney

Jennifer Tedjeske

Chapman & Cutler LLP

Hugo Rodriguez

ReMax 10

Helena Stangle

Acero School Network

Jeffrey Brubaker

Wabtec Corporation

Patricia Brown

Deloitte

Becky Brueckel

Foley & Lardner LLP

Jose Garcia

Northwest Community Credit Union

Nancy Johnson

Adtalem Global Education

Matthew Nugen

WEC Energy Group

Praseen Nath

Titanium Realty Group

Noam Avidov

IMC Trading

Kathleen Smith

BMO Harris Bank

Audra Wilson

Shriver Center on Poverty Law

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/05/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data