PLATINUM2024

Brightpoint

Strong Families. Thriving Children

Chicago, IL   |  http://www.brightpoint.org

Mission

Brightpoint seeks to advance the well-being of children by investing in families to disrupt the systemic and multi-generational cycle of racial, social and economic inequality. We envision an equitable world where all children and families thrive in strong communities.

Ruling year info

1933

President and CEO

Mr. Michael J. Shaver

Main address

200 W Monroe St Suite 2100

Chicago, IL 60606 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2167743

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Brightpoint works with families who do not have access to resources and support systems to prevent a moment of instability from becoming a life altering crisis through preventive based family centric programming and services. We offer prevention-based equity driven programming that puts families at the center. We know prevention works, and we are committed to working with families before small problems become life-altering crises.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Parent Support

The Parent Support services offered by Brightpoint are designed to recognize the parents unique and irreplaceable role in developing young lives. By educating and supporting parents, the incidence of child maltreatment is greatly reduced.

When families stay together: children function better socially, achieve in school and are less likely to require social services in the future. These services are also proactive, designed to intercede and provide assistance to parents before issues become greater social problems.

Our Parent Support program area offers: Prenatal Services, Home Visiting, Family Support & Fatherhood Programs.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Parents

The most important asset for child and youth wellbeing is the family and we must serve as effective partners for families because we believe families understand what they need. Our solutions include supports which are family centric and as diverse as our families to ensure we offer solutions to meet individualized needs. Brightpoint puts families at the center of every decision and believes that communities where we all work, play and live together can be strengthened through data-informed, collaborative and preventative solutions. We believe we must transform the current child welfare system and replace what we currently think of as child welfare services with what we know to be child, family and community well-being solutions.

Our Child Welfare Program area offers: Preservation, Stabilization and Foster Care programs.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Caregivers
Children and youth
Families

We provide comprehensive behavioral health services to parents, children and youth (ages 4 - 21 years old) across Illinois, including individual, family, and group therapy as well as connections to community resources such as medical providers, housing resources, and immigration guidance.

Our Mental Health & Wellness program area offers: child welfare counseling services, school based services, community based services, and violence, prevention and intervention programs.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Caregivers
Families
Children and youth

We meet families where they are, help them identify what they need to thrive, and then work hand-in-hand with them to build a strong foundation for their children in their critical early years.

Our Early Childhood Care & Education program area offers: Child & Family Centers, Home-Based Early Learning and Child Care Resources and Assistance.

Our Child & Family Centers are:
Carpentersville (Jerri Hoffmann Child & Family Center)
Palatine (Community Child Care Center of Palatine Township)
Chicago-Englewood (Mitzi Freidheim Child & Family Center)
Schaumburg (Marletta Darnall Child & Family Center)
Bloomington (Scott Child & Family Center)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Parents
Caregivers

Youth services play a critical role in providing young people with job training, mentorship, and violence prevention services. These programs empower youth to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in todays world, while also promoting positive relationships and a sense of community. By investing in youth services, we can help build stronger, more resilient communities and provide more equitable and accessible options for our youth.

Our Youth Services program area offers: Coaching & Mentoring, and Youth Counseling Services & Referrals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

El Hogar Del Nino 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provided services in these two pillars: Strong Families (Parent Support, Child Welfare, and Mental Health and Wellness) and Thriving Children (Early Childhood Care and Education and Youth Services)

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have a history of pushing boundaries, transforming systems andimproving practice. Our aspiration for children, youth and families to thrive leads us to these inescapable conclusions:

We will replace what we currently think of as child welfare services with what we know to be a child, family and community well-being solutions.

We will end the need for foster care as we know it. What was once a modern remedy is no longer the solution.

Prevention -
Expand the impact of our workforce: Grow diversity, capitalize on technology and increase collaboration. Partner with complementary organizations to improve the social determinants of health.

Family -
Transform our services and sector leadership to more proactively enable family and child well being. Reimagine our strategic identity: align with our aspirations and differentiate our work and impact. Decrease the financial risk from dependence on any single public funding source.

Equity -
Incorporate a racial equity and social justice emphasis to all that we do. Build governance capacity to be more diverse and generative. Setting and achieving their goal.

More families receive services they feel they need:
Connected to a coach, advocate or mentor
Supports built around family strengths and assets
Challenges do not become crises

Fewer children impacted by the child welfare system:
Fewer kids enter foster care
More children cared for by supported relatives
More parents reunited with children

More children and families thriving:
Stable employment at a family-supporting wage
Part of a strong social network
Setting and achieving their goal

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Brightpoint
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Brightpoint

Board of directors
as of 03/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Alan Conkle

PriceWaterhouseCoopers, LLC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/20/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/10/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.