Jewish Federation of Chicago

Together for Good

aka Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Chicago, Jewish United Fund of Chicago   |   Chicago, IL   |  http://www.juf.org

Mission

The Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago is the one organization that impacts every aspect of local and global Jewish life, providing human services for Jews and others in need, creating Jewish experiences and strengthening Jewish community connections.

As a member of the greater Chicago community, JUF also participates in the wider civic arena of addressing general community needs and problem solving for people of all faiths.

Ruling year info

1949

President

Lonnie J. Nasatir

Main address

30 S Wells St

Chicago, IL 60606 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2167761

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Chicago-area Human Services

The Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago supports various nonprofit organizations in the Chicago area that provide assistance to people of all faiths, including hot meals and groceries; utility and rent assistance; prescriptions and medical care for impoverished families; job training and placement for people who are out of work; therapeutic school and specialized care for children with disabilities; support services for Holocaust survivors; assisted living, specialized Alzheimer’s care and transportation for seniors; respite services for caregivers of frail seniors and people with disabilities; counseling, prevention and intervention services for troubled teens; and an entire continuum of prevention and therapeutic services for individuals and families in crisis.

Population(s) Served

Through its allocation to the Jewish Federations of North America, JUF/Federation supports services to nearly 2 million individuals in Israel and 70 other countries. These range from basic social service programs addressing needs of all age groups to formal and informal Jewish education/identity development. The major beneficiary organizations that engage in overseas work through support from JFNA are the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, the Jewish Agency for Israel and International ORT.

Population(s) Served

The Jewish world encompasses a vast array of needs, interests, perspectives and priorities, and JUF/Federation support reflects that tremendous diversity. Among the many programs and agencies that benefit are Birthright Israel, the major theological seminaries, the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, the Jewish Women's Foundation, United Against a Nuclear Iran, the Israel Action Network, the Chicago Jewish Population Study, JCERT Emergency Services, the Jewish Labor Committee, university Israel Studies programs, American Jewish World Service, preservation of Jewish cemeteries and more.

Population(s) Served

JUF/Federation connects community members to Israel, to Jewish life and to one another, transmitting a vibrant Jewish heritage that honors the past and looks with hope to the future. JUF is the largest funder of Jewish day school education in Chicago, provides tuition assistance to three in four local Jewish day school students, supports teen youth movements and programming, and communal resources for young adults, as well as the Chicago Board of Rabbis, the Spertus Institute for Jewish Learning & Leadership, the Aliyah Council of Greater Chicago and the National Foundation for Jewish Culture.

Population(s) Served

JUF/Federation creates exciting Jewish experiences that ignite a love of Jewish life, learning and community. We pioneer strategies to engage unaffiliated Jews of all ages and strengthen their Jewish identity and involvement, through parent-infant play groups, early childhood center tuition assistance, free Jewish children's books, Jewish camp scholarships and more. Other programs focus on Hillel and Jewish life on campus, screening and education about Jewish genetic disorders, Israel experiences for teens and young adults, volunteer networking, synagogue outreach, government affairs efforts, leadership development, JUF's Jewish Community Relations Council and more.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Meals, food bags and grocery cards delivered to highly vulnerable Chicago-area Jews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Individuals receiving free or highly-subsidized mental and physical healthcare

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Households in crisis receiving emergency financial assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Local Holocaust survivors maximizing their independence through in-home services, emergency financial assistance, group support, advocacy and socialization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Children with disabilities receiving intensive therapeutic services and education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Immigrants to Israel assisted with job preparation and placement, language skills, housing and socialization programming to help them integrate into Israeli society

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Disadvantaged but promising Israeli students immersed in educational opportunities designed to close the socioeconomic gap and ensure their future success

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Impoverished elderly and children throughout Russia and other Eastern European countries receiving food, medicine and heating fuel to sustain them

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Chicago-area Jewish families participating in Young Families engagement programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Jewish day school students receiving scholarships and/or tuition assistance at 15 local Jewish day schools

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Children engaged in formal and informal Jewish learning experiences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Synagogues, schools camps, colleges and agencies receiving JUF grants to enhance security

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

$1.2M was awarded in response to an uptick in anti-Semitic activity. An additional $1.7M was leveraged for a total of $2.9M in funding for new or enhanced security operqtions projects.

Chicago-area children who received financial assistance or subsidies for Jewish early childhood educational experiences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Families with young children who received free, monthly Jewish books and music through JUF's PJ Library program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2015 - PJ Library only

Jewish young adults who strengthened their connection to the Jewish homeland during JUF Birthright Israel free trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

College students participating in Jewish life on Illinois campuses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Young Jewish adults attending events focused on engaging the next generation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Community members volunteering their time through JUF's TOV Volunteer Network

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

JUF Breakthrough Fund grants for innovative efforts to meet local human needs, engage Chicagoans Jewishly, and strengthen Jewish communities in Israel & overseas

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

JUF/Federation gives help and hope to the most vulnerable through a network of local agencies and programs, transforming the lives of 500,000 Chicagoans of all faiths who are in need at every stage of life.

JUF/Federation stands in solidarity with Israel and the Jewish people worldwide, advocating on key issues, supporting humanitarian assistance for 2 million Jews in Israel and 70 countries around the world, and rushing aid to communities in crisis in Israel and beyond.

JUF/Federation advances Jewish learning and identity, funding the best in formal and informal Jewish education and connections to Israel.

JUF/Federation builds Jewish community and fosters a sense of peoplehood, engaging Jews of all ages and backgrounds in Jewish life and community.

JUF/Federation cultivates Jewish continuity from generation to generation, helping to transmit a vibrant Jewish heritage that honors the past and looks with hope to the future.

JUF/Federation brings the community together from across the spectrum of Jewish life to take part in collective action and ensure the Jewish future.

Through a combination of annual allocations and directed grants, we mobilize more than $200 million in financial resources, which we allocate to more than 70 affiliates, beneficiary agencies and programs that provide wide-ranging direct services and programs to populations in need across the metropolitan area and around the globe.

Among our local partner agencies are Jewish Child & Family Services (JCFS), Jewish Vocational Service (JVS) , Jewish Community Center of Chicago (JCC,) CJE SeniorLife, Mount Sinai Hospital, Associated Talmud Torahs, The ARK, EZRA Multi-Service Center, Maot Chitim, JUF Uptown Café, Response, Keshet, the Hillels of Illinois, SHALVA, and many more. Overseas partners include the Jewish Agency For Israel (JAFI) and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC).

Additionally, we work closely with the United Way, other sectarian and non-sectarian social service organizations, and many government-supported programs and agencies.

We have a sophisticated planning and allocation process, led by a partnership of staff and lay leaders, involving nearly 200 board and community members and four standing commissions and committees. This planning and allocations process is informed by periodic local population studies that examine the demographic composition of the Chicago-area Jewish community, identify unmet needs, and help us understand the status of community access to existing services. The demographic information gleaned—including population growth and suburban migration, household structure, the intermarriage rate, effects of the recession on local households and congregational membership—informs JUF/Jewish Federation and its agencies in designing and delivering needed community services going forward.

Since 1900, the Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago has proudly served as Jewish Chicago's central source of hope and help for people in need. Rooted in a commitment to Jewish collective responsibility, we provide for the most vulnerable members of our community.

JUF/Federation has a 90-member volunteer Board of Directors, thousands of volunteers for our programs and fundraising activities, 250 paid professional staff of the highest caliber, and some 36,000 gifts to our annual campaign. We are led by a President who has been at the organization's helm for more than 38 years and has won national and international acclaim for his leadership in the field of Jewish philanthropy.

We have an efficient infrastructure in place to raise and allocate funds. Our fundraising costs are less than a nickel per dollar. We are rated ""Aa3 with stable outlook"" by Moody's.
The Jewish Federation maintains offices in Springfield, Illinois, and Washington, D.C., to monitor and apply for government funding opportunities and to advocate on a variety of other issues important to our community.

JUF/Federation currently serves 500,000 Chicagoans of all faiths and 2 million Jews in Israel and 70 countries worldwide. We provide an aggregate $200+ million in funding to a network of humanitarian services encompassing 70 agencies and programs that care for people at every stage of life, regardless of their ability to pay. JUF/Federation's leadership role and centralized support services for our network of Jewish communal agencies offers tremendous cost-efficiencies. With combined fundraising expenses of only 4% of total income, we offer a return on investment that is broadly trusted.

With the vast array of needs that JUF addresses, there always will be more that could be done. Our constant objective is to assure that the infrastructure and resources always are in place and prepared to meet and adapt to whatever circumstances arise, and to be proactive in identifying them in their earliest stages.

We know there are tens of thousands of individuals who rely upon the services and programs offered by our affiliate and beneficiary agencies for daily support - and in many cases, for survival. Our goal is to continue increasing the allocations for our affiliate and beneficiary agencies, and to allow them to expand the services and programs they can provide—with the ultimate goal of eliminating wait lists for services.

Financials

Jewish Federation of Chicago
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Jewish Federation of Chicago

Board of directors
as of 7/3/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Andrew Hochberg

Next Realty, LLC

Term: 2018 - 2020

Bill Silverstein

Private Real Estate Investor

Wendy Berger

WBS Equities, Inc.

Steven Miller

Principal, Origin Ventures (finance)

Eric Rothner

Principal, Hunter Management, LLC

Harry Seigle

The Elgin Company

Alan Solow

Partner, Resolute Consulting, LLC

Michael Zaransky

MZ Capital Partner, Prime Property Investors LTD

Pam Szokol

N/A

Marcie Hemmelstein

Carylon Foundation

Joseph Wolf

Lake Shore Communities

Gita Berk

Skin Care Center

Robert Bond

Co-Founder & President, Bond Companies (Professional Real Estate Investment)

David Brown

Chairman and Principal, Much Shelist (law)

Mark Chudacoff

President & CEO, Midwest Truck & Auto Parts

Bruce Ettelson

Partner, Kirkland & Ellis (law)

Linda Fisher

N/A

Jason Friedman

Friedman Properties, Ltd.

Linda Ginsburg

Vernon & Park Partners, LLC

David Golder

Golder Investment Management

Dana Gordon

N/A

Hilary Greenberg

N/A

Andrea Grostern

Marketing Consultant, DoubleFlip Marketing

Joshua Herz

President, Associated Agencies (insurance)

Scott Heyman

Partner, Sidley Austin (law)

Dana Westreich Hirt

N/A

Deborah Schrayer Karmin

Karmin Schwartz Design

King Harris

Harris Holdings

Andrea Yablon

Presidednt, Diversified Health Resources

Cindy Kaplan

Field Holdings, LLC

Jason Peltz

Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP (law)

Wendy Abrams

Jeremy Amster

Tower Hill Healthcare Center

Peter Bensinger, Jr.

Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP (law)

Michael Fishman

Greenberg Traurig, LLP

Andrew Glick

Northern Trust Company

Jordan Goodman

Casterline Goodman Gallery

Steven Greenbaum

Senior Housing Group LLC

Ari Klein

Cushman & Wakefield of Illinois

Ann-Louise Kleper

Lewis & Davidson, Ltd.

Adrienne Kriezelman

Jennifer Leemis

Paradise 4 Paws

Brian Levinson

Healthcare Consultant, JB Healthcare

Marc Roth

Kim Schwachman

Morris Silverman

MS Management Corp.

Rabbi Alex Felch

Congregation B'nai Tikvah

Robert Ferencz

David Goldenberg

Resolute Consulting LLC

Craig Goldsmith

GCM Grosvenor

Sheri Hokin

Hokin Sternberg Insurance Services

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No