PLATINUM2024

Lawrence Hall

Serving Children, Families and Communities since 1865

Chicago, IL   |  www.lawrencehall.org

Mission

Empowering those who have experienced trauma by providing healing, stability, and community connection.

Ruling year info

1943

Chief Executive Officer

Kara Teeple

Chief Program Officer

Mr. Sean McGinnis

Main address

4833 N Francisco Ave Lawrence Hall

Chicago, IL 60625 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Lawrence Hall School for Boys

Lawrence Hall Youth Services

EIN

36-2167771

NTEE code info

Group Home, Residential Treatment Facility - Mental Health Related (F33)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care

The Foster Care Program provides safe, nurturing homes for children who have been removed from their birth families due to abuse and/or neglect. These experiences are extremely traumatic for the youth. Lawrence Hall takes every measure to ensure that the foster child is provided with supportive foster parents and caseworkers that are sensitive to that trauma. In addition, children receive additional supports in the form of individual and family therapy. The child’s successful transition to their long term placement, whether it is to their birth family, guardianship, or adoption resource, is aided by these supports

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents
Family relationships

The Child and Family Treatment Center is Lawrence Hall’s most acute level of care and a valued placement option when abused and neglected youth need residential treatment to stabilize their behaviors.

It is designed to treat youth with severe emotional behaviors. The youth have survived repeated traumatic experiences including physical abuse, neglect, abandonment, violence, and separation from their loved ones. Youth at the Child and Family Treatment Center learn how to improve social skills, develop coping mechanisms, form healthy relationships, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. The treatment teams work in collaboration with the youth, their families, therapists, and other supportive people in the youth’s life to ensure care is youth guided, family friendly, strength based, and trauma-informed.

The primary goal of the Child and Family Treatment Center is to provide a treatment intervention for the most severe emotionally challenged youth, preparing youth and their families for the youth’s successful return. If the youth can’t return home, the next least restrictive family based environment is pursued.

Note that residential treatment also includes expressive therapies like music therapy, and therapeutic recreation and canine therapy.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Young men
Adolescent boys
Preteen boys

Transitional Living Program, the first step in our two-step older adolescent living programs, serves youth between the ages of 17 and 21. The goal of each program is to help youth successfully complete high school and gain work experience along with helping the youth build a support system wrapped around them for long term stability.

Youth in the Transitional Living Program live in one of four locations which are staffed around-the-clock with Lawrence Hall Life Skills Educators. Training groups teach budgeting, employment skills, career planning, financial competence, time management, and basic apartment upkeep in order to prepare them to move to an independent living situation.

Lawrence Hall’s Older Adolescent Programs annually serves more than 100 young adults who through their history of being abused and/or neglected have suffered severe trauma. The program provides comprehensive services designed to meet the individuals needs as they prepare to lead productive lives on their own.

The Older Adolescent Program has two levels: the Transitional Living Program-serving youth between the ages of 17 and 21, and Independent Living—serving youth between the ages of 19 and 21. The goal of each program is to help youth successfully complete high school and gain work experience along with helping the youth build a support system wrapped around them for long term stability.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
Social and economic status
Family relationships

A fully-accredited Therapeutic Day School and Diagnostic Education Program specialize in educating children and adolescents with emotional challenges, behavior disorders and learning disabilities that inhibit success in public school settings. Our students participate in academics while receiving specialized care through our unique therapeutic programs including arts education, culinary arts, service learning and recreation. We help them to develop the skills and resources they need to return to public school settings prepared to achieve and graduate, enter the workforce, college or a vocational school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with learning disabilities

Creative Therapies complement our traditional talk therapy, since many of our youth find it easier to express their trauma in a way that engages more than just speech. This allows youth in DCFS care to tap into their creative sides while clinical therapists provide individualized treatment, allowing the youth to explore their feelings, manage behaviors, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem. Our In-house Creative Therapies: Art Therapy, Music Therapy, Therapeutic Recreation. Our Partner-based therapies include: "Creative Therapies complement our traditional talk therapy, since many of our youth find it easier to express their trauma in a way that engages more than just speech. This allows youth in DCFS care to tap into their creative sides while clinical therapists provide individualized treatment, allowing the youth to explore their feelings, manage behaviors, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem: Canine Therapy, Therapeutic Theater, and Wilderness Therapy.

Population(s) Served

Job training, placement and mentoring. With it's office located in Chicago's South Shore community, Workforce Development helps at-risk youth secure and retain employment through its programs; MY TIME (Mentoring Youth To Inspire Meaningful Employment) IYIP (Illinois Youth Investment Program), WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act), and HOPES (Hospitality Opportunities for People Reentering Society) programs. This program at Lawrence Hall also is part of the One Summer Chicago program. Youth are also involved in youth leadership programming through many local organizations we have partnerships with.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents

The effects of trauma ripple through communities, resulting in mistrust, separation, and oftentimes violence. Our Community Wellness program helps rebuild community trust and connection through restorative justice initiatives, community events and resource groups, violence prevention programs, and case management. In addition, Lawrence Hall provides both mental health and career-focused clinical therapies with each of its programs. Youth in Workforce Development as well as Community Wellness programs benefit from a variety of therapeutic services, and Lawrence Hall is one of two agencies in Chicago that receives referrals for youth with problematic sexual behaviors who need extra mental health support.
Lawrence Hall currently has the following Community Wellness programs:
Service Coordination and Navigation (SCaN) Program, Justice Advisory Council Recidivism Reduction Program (JAC), Violence Prevention, Mentoring and COVID-19 Community Response Workers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Unemployed people
Low-income people

Where we work

Awards

School of Excellence 2011

National Association of Special Education Teachers

School of Excellence 2012

National Association of Special Education Teachers

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of patient restraints used (mechanical and physical holds)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child and Family Treatment Center (Residential)

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Lawrence Hall collects restraint data in our Residential Treatment Facility and our Therapeutic Day School. We monitor this and look for trends. We are always focused on a reduction in restraints.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Lawrence Hall
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Lawrence Hall

Board of directors
as of 02/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rebecca Coke

US Central Region Transfer Pricing Leader, Ernst & Young, LLP, Chicago

Term: 2023 - 2025


Board co-chair

WIlliam Quinlan

Partner, Quinlan Law Firm, LLC

Term: 2023 - 2025

Daniel J Boshardt

Alex. Brown

Al Chircop

Independent Consultant

Jayne Coyne

No Affiliation

Paul P Biebel

Cook County Criminal Courthouse, Retired

Rebecca Coke

Ernst & Young, LLP

David Merjan

Owner, Epona Rising

Glori Rosenson

International Society for Stem Cell Research

Andrew Oleszczuk

No Affiliation

Marguerite A Quinn

Circuit Court of Cook County, Law Division, Jury

Megan Morrissey

Perkins Coie

William Quinlan

Quinlan Law Firm, LLC

Jeffrey E Singleton

The Project Factory, Inc.

Sue Blomberg

Therapist, Private Practice

Germaine Harris

Alliance Bernstein

Listner Martinez

Listiner Inspires

Andrew Oleszczuk

Community Volunteer

Nicole Quaisser

LM Restaurant Group

Glori Rosenson

International Society of Stem Cell Research

Nirav Shah

Protiviti, Inc.

Mike Wechselberger

GSK

Tom Stocks

Elston Capital Partners, LLC

Kevin Byrne

Gallagher

Vipin Bhatia

Digital and Tech

DeAnna Jones

NEPC, LLC

Henry Horace

Associate Dean of Instruction, City Colleges of Chicago

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/28/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/10/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.