Lawrence Hall

Serving Children, Families and Communities since 1865

Chicago, IL   |  www.lawrencehall.org

Mission

Lawrence Hall is a community based service agency embracing at-risk youth and their families by instilling resilience, healing and changing lives for good.

Ruling year info

1943

Chief Executive Officer

Kara Teeple

Chief Program Officer

Mr. Sean McGinnis

Main address

4833 N Francisco Ave Lawrence Hall

Chicago, IL 60625 USA

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Formerly known as

Lawrence Hall School for Boys

Lawrence Hall Youth Services

EIN

36-2167771

NTEE code info

Group Home, Residential Treatment Facility - Mental Health Related (F33)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care

The Foster Care Program provides safe, nurturing homes for children who have been removed from their birth families due to abuse and/or neglect. These experiences are extremely traumatic for the youth. Lawrence Hall takes every measure to ensure that the foster child is provided with supportive foster parents and caseworkers that are sensitive to that trauma. In addition, children receive additional supports in the form of individual and family therapy. The child’s successful transition to their long term placement, whether it is to their birth family, guardianship, or adoption resource, is aided by these supports

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents
Family relationships

The Child and Family Treatment Center is Lawrence Hall’s most acute level of care and a valued placement option when abused and neglected youth need residential treatment to stabilize their behaviors.

It is designed to treat youth with severe emotional behaviors. The youth have survived repeated traumatic experiences including physical abuse, neglect, abandonment, violence, and separation from their loved ones. Youth at the Child and Family Treatment Center learn how to improve social skills, develop coping mechanisms, form healthy relationships, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. The treatment teams work in collaboration with the youth, their families, therapists, and other supportive people in the youth’s life to ensure care is youth guided, family friendly, strength based, and trauma-informed.

The primary goal of the Child and Family Treatment Center is to provide a treatment intervention for the most severe emotionally challenged youth, preparing youth and their families for the youth’s successful return. If the youth can’t return home, the next least restrictive family based environment is pursued.

Note that residential treatment also includes expressive therapies like music therapy, and therapeutic recreation and canine therapy.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Young men
Adolescent boys
Preteen boys

Transitional Living Program, the first step in our two-step older adolescent living programs, serves youth between the ages of 17 and 21. The goal of each program is to help youth successfully complete high school and gain work experience along with helping the youth build a support system wrapped around them for long term stability.

Youth in the Transitional Living Program live in one of four locations which are staffed around-the-clock with Lawrence Hall Life Skills Educators. Training groups teach budgeting, employment skills, career planning, financial competence, time management, and basic apartment upkeep in order to prepare them to move to an independent living situation.

Lawrence Hall’s Older Adolescent Programs annually serves more than 100 young adults who through their history of being abused and/or neglected have suffered severe trauma. The program provides comprehensive services designed to meet the individuals needs as they prepare to lead productive lives on their own.

The Older Adolescent Program has two levels: the Transitional Living Program-serving youth between the ages of 17 and 21, and Independent Living—serving youth between the ages of 19 and 21. The goal of each program is to help youth successfully complete high school and gain work experience along with helping the youth build a support system wrapped around them for long term stability.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
Social and economic status
Family relationships

A fully-accredited Therapeutic Day School and Diagnostic Education Program specialize in educating children and adolescents with emotional challenges, behavior disorders and learning disabilities that inhibit success in public school settings. Our students participate in academics while receiving specialized care through our unique therapeutic programs including arts education, culinary arts, service learning and recreation. We help them to develop the skills and resources they need to return to public school settings prepared to achieve and graduate, enter the workforce, college or a vocational school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with learning disabilities

Specialized Services are additional therapeutic and supportive services for youth to treat trauma, stabilize behavior, promote wellness and teach self-management skills essential to living independent and successful lives. These therapies include: Canine Therapy, Music Therapy, Therapeutic Recreation, The Youth Advisory Council, and Expressive Therapies.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Job training, placement and mentoring. With it's office located in Chicago's South Shore community, Project Work helps at-risk youth secure and retain employment through its programs; MY TIME (Mentoring Youth To Inspire Meaningful Employment) IYIP (Illinois Youth Investment Program), WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act), and HOPES (Hospitality Opportunities for People Reentering Society) programs. This program at Lawrence Hall also is part of the One Summer Chicago program. Youth are also involved in youth leadership programming through many local organizations we have partnerships with.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2011

North Central Association of Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement - Accreditation 2011

Awards

School of Excellence 2011

National Association of Special Education Teachers

School of Excellence 2012

National Association of Special Education Teachers

Financials

Lawrence Hall
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Lawrence Hall

Board of directors
as of 8/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Glori Rosenson

Director of Outreach, International Society for Stem Cell Research

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mrs. Rebecca Coke

US Central Region Transfer Pricing Leader, Ernst & Young, LLP, Chicago

Term: 2021 - 2023

Daniel Boshardt

Alex. Brown

Al Chircop

Independent Consultant

Jayne Coyne

No Affiliation

Paul Biebel

Cook County Criminal Courthouse, Retired

Rebecca Coke

Ernst & Young, LLP

Edwin Lennox

Retired Baxter International, Inc. & Allegiance Corp

David Merjan

Owner, Epona Rising

Scott Lee

United Airlines

Glori Rosenson

International Society for Stem Cell Research

Andrew Oleszczuk

No Affiliation

Marguerite Quinn

Circuit Court of Cook County, Law Division, Jury

Steve Melchiorre

Stratosphere Networks

Megan Morrissey

Perkins Coie

William Quinlan

Quinlan Law Firm, LLC

Christopher Wilson

Baker Botts LLP, Washington DC

Jeffrey Singleton

The Project Factory, Inc.

Sue Blomberg

Therapist, Private Practice

Mayer Grashin

PharmaCann, Inc.

Germaine Harris

Alliance Bernstein

Sam Hill

Community Volunteer

Rahul Kapoor

University of Chicago Medicine

Listner Martinez

Listiner Inspires

Andrew Oleszczuk

Community Volunteer

Nicole Quaisser

LM Restaurant Group

Glori Rosenson

International Society of Stem Cell Research

Nirav Shah

Protiviti, Inc.

Wendy Siegel

Millennia Consulting, LLC

Christine Torres

Brookfield Properties

Shelia York

Cook County Assistant States Attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability