PLATINUM2023

Hadley

Expand Your Sights

aka Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired   |   Winnetka, IL   |  http://www.HadleyHelps.org/

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Mission

Hadley’s mission is to create personalized learning opportunities that empower adults with vision loss or blindness to thrive - at home, at work and in their communities.

Ruling year info

1954

President

Ms. Julie S Tye

Main address

700 Elm St

Winnetka, IL 60093 USA

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EIN

36-2183809

NTEE code info

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

People with vision loss are more likely to experience isolation, balance problems, falls, and risk of early death. The incidence of visual impairment increases dramatically with age, and older adults who develop vision loss are also more than twice as likely to fall into depression. Furthermore, it is well established that poverty is highly correlated with vision loss, and low-income individuals with vision loss may be less likely to seek medical attention. The National Eye Institute reports that the population of people who are blind or visually impaired is expected to more than double in the coming decades, increasing from 4.2 million in 2015 to 8.9 million in 2050. Older adults are the fastest-growing age group who are new to vision loss. Since 2015, the population of people with vision loss aged 65 and older has increased by 7%. This generation will live longer, and many will face several years of striving to live independently with vision loss due to age-related diseases.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Educational Programs and Public Awareness

Hadley offers practical help, connection, and support, free of charge for everyone, with or without visual impairment. While content is designed for older adults who are new to vision loss, anyone with a visual impairment, as well as their families and professionals supporting them, also benefit from Hadley’s resources. At Hadley, people with vision loss can learn how to safely prepare food, label medication bottles, or use the low vision features on a smartphone to read email and more. These educational resources are designed to help keep visually impaired people connected to expert help and one another. Personalized online settings, live support from experts, and more than 600 how-to video and audio workshops, discussion groups, and podcast episodes are just a few of the components that make Hadley a life-changing tool for visually impaired adults.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments
Older adults
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, People with vision impairments, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Educational Programs and Public Awareness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Before launching its new platform, Hadley collected quantitative data primarily based on course enrollment and views of videos on external sources, such as YouTube.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

When someone turns to Hadley, they find the help they need, when they need it. Rather than waiting months to see a vision rehabilitation counselor, they have immediate access to resources and experts that can help them navigate this difficult transition. Because people have the opportunity to learn from and interact with others across the Hadley community—including Hadley’s Learning Experts and others facing similar challenges—the experience of vision loss becomes less lonely and isolating. Instead of focusing on what they cannot do, Hadley shows them what they can do—and how to do it.
There is something for everyone at Hadley, whether it is reading braille, tips for using assistive technology, or adaptive techniques to complete daily tasks that are made more difficult with vision loss. Hadley’s resources have always been free of charge and can be accessed on Hadley’s website. Hadley’s programs are free so that expense is not a barrier.
Individuals can easily register with Hadley and begin their learning immediately. When learners create an account with Hadley, they may choose the font size and color contrast to accommodate a variety of vision conditions. These settings are saved and remain in place whenever a learner returns to the website. Content is tailored to learners based upon their choices, feedback, preferences, and other interactions. Learners can also receive personalized, one-on-one support from Hadley’s Learning Experts, who are specialists in the vision rehabilitation field. With scalable technology, Hadley is uniquely positioned to serve the rising population of people facing vision loss and empower them to meet the challenges that lie ahead.

For 100 years, Hadley helped learners thrive through an academic service delivery model, with months-long courses facilitated by an instructor. Hadley served approximately 3,000 people each year who enrolled in 10,000 courses annually. While that worked well in the 20th century, adults in the technology-driven 21st century prefer to learn at their own pace and in short intervals. On the eve of Hadley’s second century of service, we realized that we were not reaching the growing number of older adults experiencing age-related vision loss. This population needs practical tips for completing familiar activities in new ways. Hadley reimagined how it can provide this assistance, culminating in the launch of a brand-new online learning platform on July 1, 2020.
Following months of development, guided directly by input from individuals with low vision and blindness, Hadley has overhauled its online educational interface. Personalized settings, live support from experts, and more than 600 how-to video and audio workshops, discussion groups, and podcast episodes are just a few of the components that make Hadley a useful tool for visually impaired adults. Individuals can easily register with Hadley and begin their learning immediately. On the new site, learners enable customized settings to suit their needs. When learners create an account with Hadley, they may choose the font size and color contrast to accommodate a variety of vision conditions. These settings are saved and remain in place whenever a learner returns to the website. Content is tailored to learners based upon their choices, feedback, preferences, and other interactions. Learners can also receive personalized, one-on-one support from Hadley’s Learning Experts who are experts in the field. With scalable technology, Hadley is uniquely positioned to serve the rising population of people facing vision loss and empower them to meet the challenges that lie ahead.

While developing Hadley’s new learning platform and workshops, users tested the prototypes throughout the process to make improvements. Prospective users and professionals provided invaluable feedback that helped modify the prototypes for accessibility, functionality, and ease of navigation. Using an iterative approach, Hadley is conducting ongoing evaluation to inform the new learning platform. As Hadley designs and creates new workshops, the organization actively seeks feedback from older adults regarding their needs. Feedback groups include members of low vision support groups, leaders from low vision service organizations, and the 2,000-member Hadley Advisory Panel, which is comprised of people who are visually impaired, vision rehab professionals, and family members of those with a visual impairment.

Last year, more than 25,000 learners created accounts on Hadley’s website and accessed workshops more than 66,000 times with a 70% completion rate. For comparison, the benchmark for completion rates of online content is generally between 5 – 15%. Highlights from the last fiscal year are listed below:
• Hadley launched a new braille workshop series, Braille for Everyday Use, to teach visually impaired learners to read letters, numbers, and punctuation using tactile braille. Learners in Braille for Everyday Use receive a workbook comprised of lessons with both braille and large print on each page. To deliver this unique product, Hadley partnered with an external vendor to print the large print portion of the workbook. Hadley embosses braille onto the large print pages and assembles the workbooks at its Winnetka headquarters. In FY22, 1,400 learners ordered nearly 4,000 workbooks.
• Hadley launched over forty Technology workshops, with several new workshop series and a variety of updates to existing content. Hadley released several new series on Apple products, such as iPhone/iPad for low vision and AirTags for low vision and screen reader. Hadley also published workshops that help people develop computer skills, such as using a built-in magnifier or using Google Docs with a screen reader. Finally, Hadley launched workshops to help learners read books using Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD), which is a clearinghouse for the entire catalog of digital books and magazines available through the National Library Service (NLS). Last year, more than 4,700 learners accessed Technology workshops 19,000 times.
• Hadley released twenty-four episodes of its Hadley Presents podcast. Episodes cover a wide range of topics that are of interest to blind or visually impaired listeners. Examples include “13 Favorite Kitchen Gadgets,” “Eye Doctors on Common Eye Conditions,” and “Tips for Living with Vision Loss and Dementia.” Last year, Hadley Presents received over 23,000 listens and 1,600 audio downloads, increases of 77% and 6%, respectively, over FY21.
• Hadley also hosted 128 Discussion Group sessions in FY22, covering a variety of topics, such as tips for gardening or traveling with vision loss. Discussion Groups are 1-hour interactive sessions led by Hadley Learning Experts. Last year, more than 6,000 learners participated in Discussion Groups, nearly double the number of participants in FY21.

In addition to developing new workshops, Hadley plans to fully establish its mentorship program, which is currently in a pilot stage; expand its Spanish-language content; and continue exploring dynamic partnerships to reach new audiences. In FY23, Hadley initiated several new partnerships, including with CVS to develop workshops on the new CVS Pharmacy Spoken Rx and Lumata Health to bring Hadley's resources to thousands of patients served by ophthalmology practices that use Lumata Health's services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Hadley
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hadley

Board of directors
as of 08/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Mark Stephan

Thomas Weisel Partners LLC (retired)

Term: 2025 - 2022

Steven V.L. Brown, M.D.

Chicago Glaucoma Consultants

Dewey B. Crawford

Foley & Lardner LLP (ret)

Thomas C. Denison

The Chicago Corporation

Scott B. Dickes

Hadley Capital

Barbra Bukovac

Price Waterhouse Cooper - Mid-Central Region

Sandra C. Forsythe

Civic Leader

Paul Gallo

Visa (ret)

Louis S. Harrison

Harrison & Held, LLP

Stace A. Hilbrant

401(k) Advisors, LLC

Louise A. Holland

Civic Leader

William T. McClain

401(k) Advisors, LLC

Gordon Montgomery

Antenna International

Lynne D. Montgomery

Civic Leader

Bradley E. Rendell

Rendell Sales Company

Garrick M. Rice

Sterling Partners

Juergen M. Stark

Voyetra Turtle Beach, Inc.

Mark F. Stephan

Thomas Weisel Partners LLC (ret)

Julie S. Tye

President, Hadley Institute

Allen A. Weaver

Prudential Capital Group

Jennifer Wainwright

Civic Leader

Andrew J. Cittadine

Monopar Therapeutics

Paul W. Earle, Jr.

Earle & Company, Inc.

David A. Falter

Acorn Growth Partners

Michael A. Gold, Esq.

Gold & Gold

Ann Carter

Dexcom

Mitch Greenwald

Cloudbakers Holdings

Mindy Rendell

Hadley Woman’s Board

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/03/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.