PLATINUM2024

National Anti-Vivisection Society

Advancing Science Without Harming Animals

aka NAVS   |   Chicago, IL   |  www.navs.org

Mission

The National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) is dedicated to ending the exploitation of animals used in science.

NAVS promotes greater compassion, respect and justice for animals through educational and advocacy programs based on respected ethical, scientific, and legal theory. Supported by extensive documentation of the cruelty and waste of vivisection, NAVS works to increase public awareness about animal experimentation, to promote positive solutions that advance humane science, to support the development of alternatives to the use of animals, and in cooperation with like-minded individuals and groups, to effect changes which help to end the unnecessary suffering of animals.

Ruling year info

1934

Executive Director

Kenneth Kandaras J.D.

Main address

444 N. Wells St. Suite 406

Chicago, IL 60654 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2229588

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

Other Services (D60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) is dedicated to ending the exploitation of animals used in science. As a respected leader of advocates for animals and better, more humane science, the National Anti-Vivisection Society is working to put to rest the myth that animal research is a necessary evil" and to end the practice of using animals in product testing, biomedical research and education. Through our work, NAVS aims to modernize scientific research and science education for the benefit of humans and animals alike. NAVS strives to create a more humane world that doesn't rely on cruel, unproductive animal testinga world where we find cures for diseases and nurture future scientists without harming animals. Our aim is to replace the use of animals in laboratories and classrooms with modern, humane, and human-relevant solutions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

PUBLIC EDUCATION AND AWARENESS

NAVS’ Public Education and Awareness program aims to further the public knowledge about animal experimentation and about positive solutions that advance humane science, while enhancing NAVS’ role as a national leader in supporting the development of alternatives to the use of animals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NAVS’ Student and Educator Outreach ensures that educators are made aware of dissection student choice laws, that teachers and students have access to dissection alternatives, and that students are not punished for requesting dissection alternatives. Our outreach also works to change student attitudes toward dissection while encouraging science fairs to reward projects that do not rely upon animal experimentation.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NAVS’ Science Initiatives shed light on the inadequacies of animal models; support scientific endeavors that develop, validate and implement alternatives to animals in research and education; and work to ensure that validated alternatives are accepted by U.S. regulatory agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NAVS’ Legal and Legislative Initiatives advance positive advocacy for animals while reinforcing NAVS’ position as the premier resource for information on current animal law and legislation.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The NAVS Sanctuary Fund provides emergency funding for sanctuaries across the U.S. that provide safe, permanent homes for animals "retired” from research laboratories, as well as for animals impacted by natural and man-made disasters. To date, NAVS has awarded more than 300 Sanctuary Fund grants totaling nearly $1.3 million.

Population(s) Served
Adults

NAVS is committed to supporting a variety of special initiatives, both within our organization and in cooperation with other animal advocacy groups whose purpose reflects the mission of NAVS. These efforts help save animal lives today while paving the way for long-term and positive change for animals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants given via NAVS' Animal Sanctuary Assistance Program (ASAP)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

SANCTUARY FUND

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

NAVS' Animal Sanctuary Assistance Program (ASAP) provides grants to sanctuaries receiving animals released from laboratories. Sanctuaries are vetted and evaluated by NAVS to determine eligibility.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NAVS' ultimate goal is the elimination of animal use in product testing, education, and research.

Through our work, NAVS helps educators identify and implement safe, cost-effective, humane dissection tools; scientists develop important models for human-relevant research that does not rely on the use of animals; animals find the sanctuary of a forever home after lives spent in research; and advocates advance policies that end the exploitation of animals used in the name of science.

Our goals are to end the use of preserved animal specimens in dissection activities in science classrooms, to encourage the adoption of human-relevant testing methods over outdated animal models, and to support the transition of animals from laboratories into sanctuaries or adopted homes.

By changing the way that laboratory and life sciences are taught, we can educate a new generation of students and scientists who are aware of and value humane methods of research. The future of science is cruelty free.

NAVS has developed a wide range of educational programs that present compelling evidence that using animals as models to benefit humans in the laboratory and classroom is both scientifically flawed and morally unacceptable.

Our PUBLIC EDUCATION AND AWARENESS PROGRAM aims to further public knowledge about animal experimentation and about positive solutions that advance humane science, while enhancing NAVS' role as a national leader in supporting the development of alternatives to the use of animals.

Our STUDENT AND EDUCATOR OUTREACH ensures that educators have access to dissection alternatives and that students are not punished for requesting dissection alternatives. Our outreach also works to change student attitudes toward dissection while encouraging science fairs to reward projects that do not rely upon animal experimentation. NAVS' Biology Education Advancement Program (BioLEAP) at BioLEAP.org, is a comprehensive resource for students and teachers interested in biology education resources that do not harm animals.

Our SCIENCE INITIATIVES shed light on the inadequacies of animal models; support scientific endeavors that develop, validate and implement alternatives to animals in research and education; and work to ensure that validated alternatives are accepted by U.S. regulatory agencies. Through the International Foundation for Ethical Research, which is funded by NAVS, grants are awarded to researchers who are developing alternatives to the use of animals in science.

Our LEGAL AND LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES advance positive advocacy for animals while reinforcing NAVS' position as the premier resource for information on current animal law and legislation. Our "Take Action" advocacy emails go to thousands of advocates around the country as opportunities warrant.

Since our founding in 1929, NAVS, inspired by a vision of a world filled with greater compassion, respect, and justice for animals, has worked forand has achievedsteady progress in the struggle to end the cruelty and waste of animal use in research, product testing, and education. As one of the few national organizations focused solely on ending the exploitation of animals used in science, NAVS has, over the past 95 years, built relationships with educators, scientists, attorneys, and animal advocates across the country.

Our BioLEAP offerings help teachers replace classroom dissection with non-animal models without hindering student performance. A comprehensive high school curriculum for life sciences teachers provides professionally developed resources they can leverage to raise awareness of and further explore the 3Rs of animal use in science: replacement, reduction, and refinement.

NAVS' efforts to encourage the development and adoption of non-animal testing models include providing an annual grant to the International Foundation for Ethical Research, which funds the work of early career researchers focused on non-animal, human-relevant models.

NAVS is fortunate to have active supporters comprised of individuals, corporations and foundations in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Their passion for, and commitment to, our mission provides us with a strong, broad base of continued financial support which allows us to advance our shared goal of advancing better, more humane science.

NAVS has continued its proud tradition of animal advocacy for more than 90 years. Because of NAVS, scientists around the world are receiving support in their efforts to replace the use of animals in product testing with better, more humane methods of research; post-research adoption laws are being passed, allowing animals to find homes instead of being euthanized after they are no longer being used in laboratories; and more consumers are aware of the cruelty of using animals in product testing and are choosing to shop cruelty free.

NAVS' work to educate students and legislators about student choice laws and policies, which guarantee the right of students to pursue a science education without harming an animal and without compromising their grade, has resulted in the passage of laws at the state level and given students tools to use to opt out of dissection exercises. In support of making science education more humane, NAVS has provided BioLEAP Classroom Grants to educators around the country to allow them to incorporate humane tools into their life sciences curricula. In addition, since 2002, NAVS has given Humane Science Awards to talented high school students participating in international science fairs to reward them for outstanding projects that advance science without harming animals.

Since 1985, NAVS has invested millions of dollars in the work of the International Foundation for Ethical Research to support scientists in their efforts to develop, validate, and implement human-relevant methods that replace the use of animals in research, education, and product testing. Since then, more than 75 grants have been awarded to promising scientists to advance their projects.

There is greater awareness and understanding of the inadequacies of animal models to predict what is safe and effective for humans as well as the potential of more human-relevant methods to address the health and safety needs of people while replacing the use of animals.

NAVS continues to make financial support available quickly to sanctuaries and animal rescue organizations who are receiving and caring for animals released from research labs.

Despite our successes, there is still much to be done. NAVS looks toward the day when no animals are harmed or killed in a misguided attempt to benefit humans.

Financials

National Anti-Vivisection Society
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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National Anti-Vivisection Society

Board of directors
as of 04/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Mann

Mary Ann Ligon

Joseph McHugh

Peter O'Donovan

Thomas Mahoney

Maria Enright

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data