FANNIE AND JOHN HERTZ FOUNDATION

Freedom to Innovate

aka Hertz Foundation   |   Pleasanton, CA   |  www.hertzfoundation.org

Mission

Through the Hertz Fellowship, the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation provides the nation’s most promising graduate students in science and technology with five years of funding, valued at up to $250,000, and the research freedom to pursue innovative ideas with real-world impact. All Hertz Fellows are inducted into the Hertz Community, a 1,250+ member network of leaders in science who regularly collaborate to seek solutions to science's greatest challenges.

Ruling year info

1948

President

Robbee Kosak

Main address

6701 Koll Center Parkway, Suite 250

Pleasanton, CA 94566 USA

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EIN

36-2411723

NTEE code info

Public Foundations (T30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hertz Fellowship

The Hertz Fellowship provides the nation’s most promising graduate students in science and technology with five years of funding, valued at up to $250,000.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Academics

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Hertz Foundation is committed to enhancing our nation's security and economic vitality by building and nurturing our pipeline of leaders in science and technology.

Through the Hertz Fellowship, we provide the nation’s most exceptional graduate students in science and technology with five years of funding, research freedom during their doctoral work, and mentorship and networking opportunities throughout their careers to pursue innovative solutions that address our nation’s, and the world’s, most pressing challenges and promising technological opportunities.

Key to fueling these leaders in science and technology is programming offered through the Hertz community, the network of more than 1,200 Hertz Fellows that includes many of our nation’s most accomplished science and technology leaders and disruptors. The community offers a variety of programs, including internships, professional mentoring, research collaborations, and workshops to fuel fellows’ professional impact and success.

The Hertz community’s intimate size and representation across a diverse array of fields creates a powerful engine to support professional endeavors and collaboration. It provides a unique resource to recruit world-class talent into their academic, private, and government institutions, as well as to identify potential research collaborators, partner on technology commercialization, and identify and invest in early-stage companies.

The past year has shown the power of investing in our nation’s future science and technology leaders. Amid a global public health crisis, emerging threats to cybersecurity, expansive environmental catastrophes, and global insecurity, it is our nation’s scientists, engineers, mathematicians and computer scientists—many of them Hertz Fellows—who have and continue to provide trustworthy breakthroughs and technological advancements that have already saved lives.

That’s why we aim to give Hertz Fellows unparalleled research freedom and flexibility during their doctoral work and access to their peers in the Hertz community throughout their lives. By enabling Hertz Fellows to pursue bold ideas, potent collaborations, and promising opportunities, we empower them to apply their talent where it is most urgently needed—from the future of healthcare and the environment to the security of our nation and the world.

Strategy 1. Enhance the Hertz Fellowship Model
- Secure additional funding to increase annual fellowship awards to 25 annually.
- Expand student programming to include more in-depth career mentoring, soft-skill development and expanded internships to enrich their readiness to hit the ground running in their careers of choice.

Strategy 2. Create a One-of-a-Kind Community of Hertz Fellows
Our goal is to offer career development and collaboration opportunities that empower Hertz Fellows to solve our nation’s most pressing challenges.

One of the Hertz Foundation’s most powerful differentiators is the lifelong support we provide to our community of more than 1,200 Hertz Fellows, including mentoring, professional development workshops, and networking opportunities. Through this community, our Hertz Fellows are equipped with a set of peers and collaborators–spanning scientific disciplines, geography, and multiple generations–to help them develop ideas and offer professional support at every stage of their careers.

We have hired a new Director of Community, who in collaboration with the chair of our Fellowship and Programs Council, will be working with select volunteers around the country to develop enhanced programs that amplify the career success of all fellows, from those currently in graduate school to more senior fellows who are established in their careers.

Strategy 3. Enhance Diverse Pipelines to Fuel Innovation
The Hertz Foundation believes that by diversifying the nation’s pipeline of leadership in science and technology, we can help fuel the pace and significance of our nation’s science and technology advancement and global leadership. Therefore, we have established two objectives:

Attract a more diverse pool of fellowship candidates reflecting the most promising STEM PhD talent in the US, regardless of their collegiate background, race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, and age. By doing so, the foundation can discover and fund even more promising young scientists whose creative approaches to their work hold the potential for shattering frontiers and benefiting our nation.

We expect our fellows to be leaders in their disciplines as well as their professions in every respect throughout their careers. Therefore, we aim to support and mentor fellows in best practices to attract, lead, and nurture diverse and exceptionally high-performing teams.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Hertz Fellows, volunteers, partners, donors, and friends of the foundation

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We began our strategic planning process by asking Hertz Fellows to characterize the Hertz Fellowship experience and how they believe it can have the most impact in the future. Respondents told us that the Hertz Fellowship was an important part of their career success and the Hertz community provides lifelong value. In response, we hired a new Director of Community, who in collaboration with the chair of our Fellowship and Programs Council, is developing enhanced programs that amplify the career success of all fellows, from those currently in graduate school to more senior fellows who are established in their careers. We launched a new online mentoring series for our fellowship recipients and are working with major corporations to share more about jobs and internship opportunities.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Hertz Foundation for years has incorporated feedback from the very Hertz Fellows we serve, including through surveys, informal feedback, and volunteer participation in our Fellowship and Programs Council. This model has enabled us to tap into the knowledge and expertise within the community while providing a hands-on opportunity for fellows looking to support the evolution of the fellowship program and our numerous career development programs. This has helped us refine the fellowship selection process, enhance the programming we offer, and sharpen communications to become ever more transparent in our goals and operations. Community members eport they feel more engaged, connected, and valued by the foundation, which in turn, has led to more opportunities to partner with them.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FANNIE AND JOHN HERTZ FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FANNIE AND JOHN HERTZ FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 05/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. David Galas

Pacific Northwest Research Institute

Stephen Fantone

Optikos Corporation

Paul Young

Goldman, Sachs & Co. (retired)

Carla Newman

Grumble Dog

Michael Ansour

March Partners LLC

Carol Burns

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Elise Cawley

Roger Falcone

UC Berkeley

Samuel Fuller

Analog Devices (retired)

Dan Goodman

ASM NEXX Inc.

Rosemarie Havranek

Philanthropist

Dick Miles

Texas A&M University

Amir Nashat

Polaris Venture Partners

Cooper Rinzler

Breakthrough Energy Ventures

Monika Schleier-Smith

Stanford University

Ray Sidney

Dove Mountain

Lee Swanger

Exponent Inc

Philip Welkhoff

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.