PLATINUM2024

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JUVENILE & FAMILY COURT JUDGES

For Every Court and Every Child

aka NCJFCJ   |   Reno, NV   |  www.ncjfcj.org

Mission

The MISSION of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges is to provide all judges, courts, and related agencies involved with juvenile, family, and domestic violence cases with the knowledge and skills to improve the lives of the families and children who seek justice.

Ruling year info

1975

CEO

Joey Orduna Hastings

Main address

PO Box 8970

Reno, NV 89507 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2486896

NTEE code info

Professional Societies & Associations (B03)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (I12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges is devoted to ensuring justice for every family and every child in courts throughout the country. As the largest and oldest judicial membership and training organization in the nation we serve an estimated 30,000 professionals in addressing the needs and issues concerning child welfare, family law, domestic relations, juvenile justice and human trafficking that are confronted daily in the juvenile and family justice system.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NCJFCJ 87th Annual Conference

The 87th Annual Conference features top tier presentations on current and cutting edge topics that will inspire, provoke, and precipitate discussions about issues facing the juvenile and family court system. The conference will also include plenary sessions highlighted by topic specific training tracks on family law, juvenile justice, child welfare, and family violence; as well as tracks featuring practical and innovative solutions. This conference is historic as it is the first annual conference to be held on tribal lands. The NCJFCJ 87th Annual conference will be held July 21-24, 2024 at the Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass in Phoenix, Arizona.

Population(s) Served

The purpose of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) Implementation Sites Project is to build on the success of our Model Courts Project by engaging selected jurisdictions in cutting-edge program, policy, and initiative development to reduce the number of children in foster care and improve the outcomes for children in care.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The NCJFCJ has advanced social change in courts and communities across the country by providing cutting-edge training, technical assistance, and policy development on issues related to the effects of abuse across a lifespan. The NCJFCJ's projects have enhanced the safety, well-being, and stability of domestic violence victims and their children by improving the response of criminal, civil, and social justice systems.

In 1999, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) published Effective Interventions in Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment Cases: Guidelines for Policy and Practice. This publication, commonly referred to as “the Greenbook” due to its green cover, helps child welfare, domestic violence service providers and family courts work together more effectively to serve families experiencing violence. Since the Greenbook’s release, dozens of communities around the country have used it to improve their policies and practices and developed enhanced coordination among courts and social service agencies to better serve families in need.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Families

Join us in Cleveland, Ohio for the 2024 National Conference on Juvenile Justice. This conference is a vital and important educational opportunity for judges, probation officers, detention facility employees, and other stakeholders in the juvenile justice system. This conference will explore gaps in services, discover new and improved practices, share cutting edge research, and motivate participants to explore positive case outcomes for youth involved in the delinquency system.

Some of the featured topics will include: alternatives to detention, trauma-informed justice, cross-over youth, deep-end youth, teen dating violence, ending solitary confinement, domestic sex trafficking of minors, anti-shackling alternatives, racial and ethnic disparity, school pathways to the justice system, brain science, child development, mental health, juvenile and family treatment drug courts, LGBTQ issues in the juvenile justice system, and unaccompanied minors in immigration.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

One of the largest and oldest judicial membership organizations in the nation, the NCJFCJ serves an estimated 30,000 professionals in the juvenile and family justice system including judges, referees,

Number of paid participants in conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of conferences held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The NCJFCJ host 2 national conferences annually.

Number of meetings held with decision makers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The NCJFCJ Board of Directors meets 3 times per a year.

Number of diversity training courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

2024 National Conference on Juvenile Justice

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

DEI Roundtables are conducted at both conferences annually. Additionally, NCJFCJ offers ongoing trainings and access to a DEI Toolkit.

Number of periodicals distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Juvenile and Family Court Journal focuses on issues of interest to the field of juvenile and family justice, including child abuse and neglect, juvenile delinquency, domestic violence, substance abuse

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges’ (NCJFCJ) mission is to provide all judges, courts, and related agencies involved with juvenile, family, and domestic violence cases with the knowledge and skills to improve the lives of the families and children who seek justice.

The NCJFCJ’s vision is for a society in which every family and child has access to fair, equal, effective, and timely justice.

To reach this vision, judges and court professionals need resources, up-to-date best practices, and peer connections to do the best they can for their communities. Leveraging its more than 80 years of experience and proven track record, the NCJFCJ aims to meet these needs by providing judges, court professionals, and other influential stakeholders with forward-thinking training, premier research, and a membership community of like-minded professionals to help them make the best decisions for those they serve.

The NCJFCJ developed six strategies for increasing its impact and ensuring organizational effectiveness. These strategies cut across training, research, and membership, as well as NCJFCJ’s operations for the next five years:
1. Increase member, staff, and partner diversity
2. Amplify messaging and marketing to expand reach of services and brand
3. Increase membership
4. Diversify revenue by pursuing fee-for-service opportunities
5. Engage state decision-makers
6. Align internal structure and processes

The NCJFCJ has a tremendous opportunity and unique ability to leverage its proven track record, talented leadership, staff, board, partners, and committed membership to strengthen its brand, expand its reach, and serve more diverse membership in communities across the country.

The NCJFCJ’s leadership continues to expand and diversify. Our Board of Directors consists of leaders from judicial officials to private sector representatives who are committed to the mission, work and success of the organization. In addition to the Board, the NCJFCJ is supported by various committees that are the catalysts of change in the work for children and families who seek justice. The NCJFCJ also established the Amicus Council which will increase national awareness, visibility, and engagement in the work of the organization by carrying forward the commitment to building financial support that helps increase our cutting-edge training, research, and technical assistance.

The NCJFCJ’s talented staff not only conducts cutting-edge research and design thought provoking programs but actively works to identify collaborators and challengers to stimulate new ways of thinking and approaches. The NCJFCJ staff, based in two national offices, represents a myriad of professions, representing more than 60 different degrees of education, including the fields of law, psychology, sociology, criminology, public administration, social work, and administration.

Since 1937, the NCJFCJ is the oldest judicial membership organization in the country, serving an estimated 30,000 judicial and court professionals to address the needs related to child welfare, family violence, domestic relations, juvenile justice and more complex issues that are confronted daily in the juvenile and family court system.

The NCJFCJ’s leadership team, staff, Board of Directors, and committees have recently accomplished the following to address and support many of these needs:
• Granted special consultative status by the United Nations (UN) Economic and Social Council for its experience in providing judicial education to juvenile and family law professionals
• Hosted the first-of-its-kind convening of organizations representing judges and practitioners within the judiciary and legal profession for the inaugural Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Summit to collectively determined where the largest gaps and opportunities to diversify the profession are
• Launched a new website that highlights initiatives, progress, and projects in all 50 states including D.C.
• Established new programs, resources, and educational opportunities for judicial officers and court professionals that address the latest and most recent trends including: the link between animal cruelty and interpersonal violence, the intersection of domestic violence cases and firearms, the role of judicial leadership in addressing the opioid epidemic to provide substance abuse treatment and support, and more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JUVENILE & FAMILY COURT JUDGES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JUVENILE & FAMILY COURT JUDGES

Board of directors
as of 01/30/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Honorable Gayl Branum Carr

Commonwealth of Virginia 19th Judicial District

Term: 2023 - 2024


Board co-chair

Honorable Robert R. Hoffman

Judge in the Texas 452nd Judicial District

Term: 2023 - 2024

Kathleen A. Quigley

Pima County Juvenile Court

Amanda N. Heath

Superior Court Judge, Augusta Judicial Circuit

Donald B. Gimbel

Geneva Advisors LLC

Gayl Branum Carr

Fairfax, Virginia

David B. Katz

Essex County-New Jersey Superior Court

Wenona Belton (Ret)

Juvenile Court of Fulton County, Georgia, Atlanta Judicial Circuit

Bobbe J. Bridge (Ret)

Founding President and CEO of Center for CHildren & Youth Justice, Seattle, Washingtonench

Tiffany Brown

Partner, Blanchard, Krasner & FrenchCourt of the District of Columbia

Patricia Cafferata

Esquire, Reno, Nevada

Shelia Calloway

Davidson County Juvenile Court Judge, Nashville, TN

Laurie Clark

Denver Juvenile Court

Jamie L. Cork

First Judicial District Bench, Hastings, Minnesota

Faith Graham

Lafayette, Indiana

David Hejmanowski

Court of Common Pleas, Delaware County

Robert Hoffman

452nd Judicial District, State of Texas

Aurora Martinez Jones

Travis County Judge Austin, Texas

Beth S. Dixon

District Court Judge, Rowan County

Angela Fonnesbeck

First District Court, Logan, Utah

Major Sheffield Ford, III

CEO, Raven Advisory, LLC

Anne K. McKeig

Minnesota Supreme Court

Michael Newell

Family Court, State of Delaware

John W. Parker

Great Falls, Montana

Jane Pearl

New York City Family Court

Tiffany Sizemore

Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas

Rodney Thompson

Mercer County Superior Court

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data