Greater Chicago Food Depository

From Hungry to Hopeful

aka Food Depository   |   Chicago, IL   |  http://www.chicagosfoodbank.org/

Mission

The Greater Chicago Food Depository, Chicago’s food bank, believes a healthy community starts with food. We are at the center of a network of more than 700 partner organizations and programs – food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, mobile distributions and other partners – working to bring food, dignity and hope to our neighbors across Chicago and Cook County. The Food Depository addresses the root causes of hunger with job training, advocacy and other innovative solutions. We are a proud member of Feeding America – the national network of food banks. By working to help those most in need go from hungry to hopeful, we truly become a Greater Chicago.

Ruling year info

1978

Principal Officer

Ms. Kate Maehr

Main address

4100 W Ann Lurie Pl

Chicago, IL 60632 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2971864

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Addressing the issue of food insecurity in Cook County, Illinois

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Partner Agencies

Working with a network of more than 700 partner agencies and programs including food pantries, soup kitchens and shelters, we provide food and hope for our neighbors in need every day.

While our network is the heart of the Food Depository’s response to hunger, the organization also operates programs and initiatives that address the evolving need in our community. Some of these initiatives are highlighted below.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Children need nutritious food to learn, grow and thrive. The Food Depository partners with schools and community organizations to offer food year-round in places where children and their families gather. Healthy Student Markets operate in schools to serve early childhood learners through college students. After school and during the summer, we provide healthy meals at parks, libraries and more.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Everyone should have access to fresh, healthy food, no matter where they live. Our mobile programs bring fresh fruit, vegetables and other nutritious food into communities that lack adequate access to affordable, healthy staples.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Food Depository is committed to providing food and support for veterans in Chicago and across Cook County. We respond to hunger among those who have served in our nation’s armed forces through a variety of innovative programs and partnerships. Food pantries located at two Veterans Affairs medical facilities distribute food weekly. Benefits Outreach specialists help veterans apply for the benefits they need to lift themselves out of poverty. We also collaborate to connect veterans experiencing homelessness with food, benefits and connections to additional community resources.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel

Joblessness and food insecurity go hand in hand. The Food Depository addresses this cause of hunger with Chicago’s Community Kitchens. This program prepares adults who are unemployed or underemployed for culinary and hospitality jobs that can lead to sustainable careers. In addition to hands-on training in a variety of culinary techniques, the program includes life skills training in topics like resume development and job interview skills. The program is effective at reducing unemployment and providing paths out of poverty: 90% of graduates are employed one year after completing the training.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Nourishing food is the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. Clients of food assistance programs often must make difficult choices that put their health at risk. By increasing access to healthy food options, we can prevent or mitigate diet-related diseases.

In partnership with local health systems, the Food Depository has designed and implemented a program that trains health center staff to screen patients for food insecurity. Those at risk are referred to nearby food distributions in the Food Depository’s network and our benefits outreach team. Participating health centers also write vouchers which patients redeem for fresh produce when our Fresh Truck mobile produce market visits their clinic.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2017

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2018)

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 1979

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Greater Chicago Food Depository works in every community across Cook County to provide food for hungry people while striving to end hunger. To bring that mission to life, the Food Depository's strategic Plan, Nourish, defines three goals we will strive toward in the next four years:

- Expanding access to nutritious food
- Partnering with and strengthening community-based responses to hunger and its root causes
- Inspiring and engaging our community to lift its collective voice to end hunger

To expand access to nutritious food, we will work to broaden the supply of food available to agencies. Second, we will work to connect eligible neighbors to the nutrition safety net.

We will collaborate with a broad coalition of community partners to more effectively meet the food and nutrition needs of the men, women and children we serve. We will build and implement a nutrition education education strategy to support healthy food choices. And, we will link food insecure neighbors to tools for economic stability.

Finally, as we strive to inspire and engage our community to lift its collective voice to end hunger, we will raise awareness and engage stakeholders on the issue of hunger. We'll advance an advocacy agenda to increase food access and protect the nutrition safety net and other programs critical for low-income individuals and families. And, we'll increase our impact in the community by being THE volunteer program of choice.

The greatest strength of the Food Depository is its incredible community of supporters and partner agencies. Thousands of people volunteer their time at the Food Depository every year. They inspected produce, repacked food, sorted food drive items, drove trucks, helped at events, and so much more. Without them, the Food Depository would not be able to achieve its mission.

Similarly, the Food Depository's network of 700 pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and programs provides the core of the organization's response to hunger. Every day, these agencies are on the front lines of the fight against hunger in every community across Cook County.

In addition to those two groups, the Food Depository understands the need to collaborate with other stakeholders in our community, including health clinics, school systems and lawmakers, if we are to end hunger.

See brief updates on each goal of the strategic plan, Nourish, below.

Expanding access to nutritious food: We continue to broaden the variety and availability of produce for our partner agencies. We are also working to grow our efforts to connect hungry neighbors to federal benefits.

Partner with and strengthen community-based responses to hunger: We have established and are growing partnerships with healthcare providers such as the Cook County Health and Hospitals System and ACCESS Community Health Network to distribute healthy food to patients struggling with hunger and health issues. We are also expanding partnerships with libraries, schools and more to offer alternative access to food for children and their families.

Inspire and engage our community to lift its voice to end hunger: In just the last year, we have - with the help of hundreds of supporters - successfully advocated for Illinois laws that are expanding access to SNAP for low-income families.

Financials

Greater Chicago Food Depository
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Greater Chicago Food Depository

Board of directors
as of 11/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Monica Brown Moss


Board co-chair

Marc Paulhus

Citizens Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes