Center for Conflict Resolution

aka CCR   |   Chicago, IL   |  www.ccrchicago.org

Mission

CCR's mission is to work with individuals, communities, courts and other institutions to manage and resolve conflict.

CCR accomplishes its mission by:

* Providing outstanding mediation services with a priority for people of limited means, those without access to these services, nonprofits, and institutions supporting the public and community interest.

* Delivering high quality, performance-based mediation and conflict management training.

* Educating the public and increasing awareness about conflict resolution.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Ms. Cassandra Lively Ph.D.

Main address

11 E Adams Ste 500

Chicago, IL 60603 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-2997680

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Dispute Resolution/Mediation Services (I51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR) improves access to justice and provides the highest quality pro-bono mediation services to clients of limited means. CCR also trains individuals, businesses and other nonprofit organizations in conflict resolution and communication skills.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mediation Services

CCR provides free mediation services to litigants and community members involved in a variety of disputes. Example case types include small claims, foreclosures, landlord-tenant, family, small business, community and religious organizations and criminal misdemeanors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CCR provides mediation training for individuals, community organizations, law firms, schools and volunteers.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mediation Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Court filings were down as a result of COVID-19, resulting in a temporary dip in average clients served per month in 2020.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCR aims to be the premier provider of community mediation services in the Midwest, raising awareness about the benefits of mediation and making the highest-quality mediation services accessible to those who could not otherwise afford it.

CCR will achieve its goals through the following strategies:

Partnering with the Circuit Court of Cook County to ensure all appropriate cases are referred for mediation.
Serving the community during the eviction crisis in the wake of COVID-19 by providing mediation and case management services in Cook County's Early Resolution Program.
Offering 6 40-hour mediation skills trainings to members of the public each year.
Partnering with area law schools in clinic programs to train new mediators to serve clients.
Delivering at least 15 conflict management and communication skills trainings to organizations, units of local government and business each year.
Leveraging relationships with community organizations, units of local government, and other referral partners as well as appropriate traditional and social media, to garner case referrals from clients who are not currently parties to litigation.

CCR benefits from the services of more than 180 highly skilled and trained volunteer mediators to deliver mediation services and mediation and conflict management/communication training. CCR also leverages the resources of its Board of Directors, Auxiliary Board and Volunteer Council to support the organization's mediation and training programs.

CCR has continually handled at least 1,500 cases per year. Staff and volunteers must continue to work with our partners in the Circuit Court of Cook County to ensure appropriate referral of cases, particularly where judges and court personnel may change. CCR works closely with partner organizations, like the Court, to innovate. For example, CCR's new program at the Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, funded by Impact Grants Chicago, trains youth at the JTDC in conflict resolution, and then provides an opportunity for youth to participate in a mediation session with a family member or other key individual in their lives, to plan for successful community re-entry.

CCR has recently partnered with the City of Chicago on a pilot program for Community-Police Mediation, which will run from January 2022-June 2022.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Anyone with a conflict in Cook County, IL (and some in the greater 6-county area).

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    New scheduling practices for intake and mediation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It gives the clients we serve a chance to actively influence the way we deliver services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Center for Conflict Resolution
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Conflict Resolution

Board of directors
as of 9/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ceylan Eatherton

Ceylan Eatherton

Marvel Johnson-Hines

Gene Cahill

Richard Berman

Christa Cottrell

Erin Kartheiser

Melissa Hirst

Matthew Jenkins

Jack Block

Steven Gilford

Richard Aaronson

Brian Gold

Yondi Morris

Kenneth Gunn

Justin Polach

Eric Yeager

Jaran Moten

Cathay Lancaster

Michele Jochner

Hon. Patrice Ball-Reed

Elizabeth Chiarello

Katie Stevens

Frank Dery

Camille Grant

Marisel Hernandez

Todd Steenson

Andrew Sheppard

Kathleen Carlson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/23/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.