River Bend Food Reservoir

Feeding people today. Ending hunger tomorrow.

aka River Bend Food Bank   |   Davenport, IA   |  www.riverbendfoodbank.org

Mission

River Bend Food Bank leads the community-wide effort to end hunger in eastern Iowa and western Illinois. • L everaging partnerships to help people in need stabilize their lives • E ducating and engaging the public in hunger issues • A dvocating on behalf of hungry people • D istributing surplus food through a network of hunger-relief agency partners and programs • S triving to end hunger

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Michael P. Miller

Main address

4010 Kimmel Dr.

Davenport, IA 52802 USA

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Formerly known as

St. Stephen's Food Bank

EIN

36-3147342

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Charitable Food Distribution

River Bend Food Bank collects surplus food from about 1000 food donors and redistributes it to people in need through a network of 300 partner agencies across 23 counties in eastern Iowa and western Illinois, including food pantries, meal sites, shelters, and daycare facilities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Throughout the school year, River Bend Food Bank partners with schools and nonprofit afterschool programs to give at-risk kids food to take home for the weekend. Each week, partner sites receive individually packed grocery bags that contain at least 2 breakfasts, 2 lunches, and 2 dinners that a child can prepare without adult supervision. To respect the privacy and dignity of each child, school or program staff discretely place a bag of food into the child’s backpack each Friday. This food sustains them until they get another hot meal at school on Monday morning. For some of the 3,000 children who receive these bags each week, the backpack food provides their only nourishment between school meals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In coordination with local schools, River Bend Food Bank operates school food pantries – safe places within a local high-need school where its students and their families can receive food items when they pick up their child or attend a school function. School administrators select qualified families. The program’s goal is to offset food insecurity for children at a critical point in their development and stabilize their families while making it convenient to pick up food.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Sadly, seniors have become a fast-growing population of chronically hungry people in eastern Iowa and western Illinois; often they will not reach out for help. The Senior Hunger Initiative begins at the warehouse with “packing parties” at which volunteers assemble boxes with fresh produce for delivery to seniors in low-income elderly housing complexes. Vans deliver the boxes filled with items such as cucumbers, tomatoes, apples, and oranges. River Bend Food Bank or community volunteers unload the food and help the residents get the boxes to their apartments.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors

Food pantries at senior communities that do not receive deliveries provide a larger assortment of food than offered through the Senior Hunger Initiative. Volunteers (often seniors who live at the pantry site) come to the Food Bank to pick up food and then stock, organize, and distribute the food to their eligible neighbors. While seniors could take the bus to a nearby pantry, age and disabilities mean that many cannot ride the bus or easily carry on to a bus the large amount of food that we give them. The pandemic and its disproportionately negative impact on seniors leave many of them fearful of leaving their homes to attend a food pantry. Having the food pantry in their community makes it more convenient – and safer – for them to stock up on needed food items.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors

Approximately 150 times each year, River Bend Food Bank Mobile Food Pantries stop at designated locations throughout eastern Iowa and western Illinois to serve people in the areas of greatest need. In about two hours, each Mobile Food Pantry dispenses around 10,000 meals, enough to feed hundreds of individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Member of Feeding America 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Unemployed people

Related Program

Charitable Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annually, River Bend Food Bank measures the number of meals distributed, comprehensive of all programs the organization manages and all partner agencies through which food is distributed.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

River Bend Food Bank's overarching strategic goal is to distribute enough meals to fill the "meal gap" (the number of meals people in our service area miss, not by choice, due to lack of access and resources to get food) by 2025, tripling meal distribution in ten years.

River Bend Food Bank will do this by: increasing capacity to triple food distribution; continually driving improvement in processes and programs; improving nutrition through increased distribution of nutritious foods; leveraging technology to track efforts and adapt to future challenges; and firmly defining what it will take to leverage relationships and connect people in need to partnering organizations to put an end to hunger.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Any adult or child experiencing hunger in the Iowa counties of Clinton, Dubuque, Jackson, Muscatine, and Scott, and the Illinois counties of Bureau, Carroll, Fulton, Hancock, Henderson, Henry, Knox, Jo Daviess, Lasalle, Lee, Marshall, McDonough, Mercer, Putnam, Rock Island, Stark, Warren, and Whiteside.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Transportation was identified as a barrier to individuals in need accessing the food pantry partners nearest them. River Bend Food Bank recently launched a pilot program to take food orders from individuals in select high-need, underserved areas to deliver to the individuals' homes to alleviate this barrier.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By offering food delivery for individuals with transportation challenges, River Bend Food Bank has improved relationships and partners have referred individuals to this new program. This has expanded food access to vulnerable populations and built trust with the organization in underserved neighborhoods.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

River Bend Food Reservoir
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

River Bend Food Reservoir

Board of directors
as of 11/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Janet Mathis

The Development Consortium

Term: 2021 - 2026

Chris Beason

Ruhl & Ruhl Realtors

Daniel Joiner

UnityPoint Health Trinity

Rob Leibfried

Honkamp Krueger & Co.

Chad Lewis

Robert W. Baird & Co.

Jan Martin

Project Success

Janet Mathis

The Development Consortium

Matt O'Brien

John Deere

Kevin O'Hara

Arthur J. Gallagher

Ben Patterson

Lane & Waterman

Tami Petsche

Quad Cities Chamber of Commerce

John Weber

Our Lady of Lourdes Church

Marie Ziegler

John Deere (retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/19/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.