Armed Services YMCA of the USA

Strengthening Our Military Family

aka ASYMCA   |   Woodbridge, VA   |  http://www.asymca.org

Mission

Founded in 1861 to provide humanitarian aid during the Civil War, the Armed Services YMCA (ASYMCA) is our nation's oldest military-family focused charity. Since its founding, ASYMCA has worked closely with the US Department of Defense (DOD) to fulfill its mission, to enhance the lives of service members and their families in spirit, mind and body through programs which address the unique challenges of military life. One of three charities with a relationship to operate on military installations, ASYMCA supports 75 installations across 18 states and Puerto Rico, serving troops and families. ASYMCA provides youth development, healthy living and social responsibility programs and services like after school mentoring, camp, early learning, childcare, food aid, deployment support, and more.

Ruling year info

1987

President and CEO

William French VADM, USN (Ret)

Main address

14040 Central Loop Suite B

Woodbridge, VA 22193 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3274346

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Military families move 6-9 times before a military child graduates from high school, 3 times more frequently than their civilian counterparts. Due to the service member’s upward trajectory, military families are faced with ongoing transitions that impact their financial security, and their physical and mental health. By offering programs that focus on Youth Development and Healthy Living, ASYMCA helps mitigate the negative effects of frequent moves and the ensuing isolation. ASYMCA programs and services enable military parents and children to make new friendships and feel part of a community. Through programs like Operation Hero and camp, military children develop emotionally and academically, and military spouses connect with others who have the same challenges. What results is improved resilience among military children and spouses, and a sense of wellbeing for the entire family. This allows the deployed service member to stay focused, and ultimately, to be successful and safe.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Operation Hero

Operation Hero is an afterschool enrichment program designed to address issues faced by many military children. Military children bear a tremendous amount of stress related to frequent moves, parental deployment, and trauma resulting from the wounding or loss of a mother or father. Operation Hero provides a safe environment where these children can express their emotions, receive academic and emotional support, and connect with peers who are experiencing the same challenges. The program provides tools (e.g. Operation Hero’s innovative homework app) and opportunities for military children to adjust positively to the challenges of military life.
Thanks to our donors, this no-cost program gives military parents the chance to get their children the help and support they need, without worrying about financial costs. Operation Hero is made possible through support from organizations like USAA Bank.

Population(s) Served

Forced frequent moves due to military orders is one of the unique stressors of military family life. Operation Little Learners provides military parents tools to enhance the developmental areas of their child and offers opportunity for early learning and bonding. The program also connects military families to a support network filled with other parents and children experiencing similar challenges. With a curriculum focused on phonics, writing, science, and math skills, each student graduates fully prepared for kindergarten having established a foundation for future social and academic success.

Population(s) Served

Children’s Waiting Room is a child care program located inside military and civilian hospitals that allows parents to attend scheduled appointments without the stress of having to find child care outside the hospital. When families have the ability to drop off their children inside the hospital at no or low cost, they are more likely to attend scheduled appointments, and in locations with Children’s Waiting Room hospital administrators report a 30% drop in no show rates. Siblings kept out of clinic areas have reduced exposure to other sick patients. Providing a child watch program at hospitals allows service members and spouses to make healthier health care decisions. Children's Waiting Room is made possible through support from organizations like Health Net Federal Services.

Population(s) Served

Camps and camping opportunities offered throughout the year at our branches and affiliate locations continue to be one of ASYMCA’s most popular programs. Camps encourage healthy living as part of our core mission of strengthening our military family, and provide much needed recreational and bonding opportunities for military children and families who have experienced multiple deployments. Camping provides a fun, educational and safe outdoor experience for military children and families to bond, make new friends and build their support networks by connecting with others who have similar backgrounds and experiences as members of the military community.

Population(s) Served

Child care and preschool have consistently proven to be an overwhelming cost for junior enlisted service members and their families. ASYMCA offers accessible, quality child care and preschool programs at affordable rates in order to prepare children for future success by teaching social skills, creativity, literacy, and fine & gross motor skills. Child care increases the military family’s financial security and well-being by enabling military spouses to seek work outside the home or continue their education, which may lead to future employment or improved employment opportunities. As a result, service members can stay focused on their mission while their spouses and partners provide vital financial resources for their family. Childcare is made possible through support from organizations like USAA Bank.

Population(s) Served

Operation Holiday Joy was initially established in collaboration with Woman’s Day Magazine and their readers to raise awareness and funds for military service members and their families during the holidays. Since 2004, Operation Holiday Joy supporters have donated more than $1.3 million for military and their families, enabling the purchase and distribution of more than 320,000 toys and the delivery of more than 25,000 baskets of food to junior enlisted families in need during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.

Population(s) Served

Operation Kid Comfort provides handmade quilts and pillows at no cost to the children of deployed active duty military service members. ASYMCA Volunteers craft custom-made quilts and pillows with photos of the service member to help children cope with emotional stress during a parent’s deployment. With your support we can provide comforting quilts to more children, making mom or dad feel closer to home.

Population(s) Served

Operation Ride Home provides financial assistance to active duty junior-enlisted military and their families to travel from their place of military service, back home for the holidays. Since Operation Ride Home began, a total of 6,410 individual junior enlisted service members and their family members have travelled from their bases to homes around the country for the holidays. Men and women from the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard have been assisted with travel to 47 of the 50 states.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who received mental health referral services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of in-hospital child watch visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of parents and children engaged in parent-child interactive early learning readiness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ASYMCA strives to strengthen our military families by focusing in three specific areas:
- Develop youth through programs that incorporate education, academic and social engagement.
- Enable healthy living through programs that promote standards for a lifetime of healthy eating and physical activity, and
- Foster social responsibility through programs which increase family resilience.

ASYMCA operates five Core Programs and a variety of other Services at thirteen individual Branches across the country, serving our largest military population and the one most in need, our junior enlisted service members and their families in each of our military branches. Additionally, ASYMCA partners with Affiliates from Y-USA to reach military members in communities without an ASYMCA presence. Specific strategies across the ASYMCA Enterprise include:
- Deliver standardized and accessible programs and services that can be replicated from one geographic area to another in order to provide a continuity of service to our military families.
- Connect families to information and resources to help them meet the unique challenges of military life.
- Partner with local military installations to identify areas of need in our military families and gaps between those needs and current programming.

The Armed Services YMCA (ASYMCA) has been providing services to junior enlisted military personnel and their families for more than 150 years. In 2017, we served 250,000 participants through 1.3 million points of service at 75 military installations across several hundred program sites.

One of three non-federal entities that operate on installations, ASYMCA is established and positioned to serve military families, providing programs which Strengthen Our Military Family. Such programs as childcare, camp, parenting classes, nutritional support, and health education help our military family overcome the challenges of military life.

All ASYMCA programs are designed to build the stamina of deployed military members by supporting their families. This critical support helps ensure that they remain focused throughout their training and deployments, contributing to their wellbeing while they strive to keep our country safe.

Founded in 1861 to provide aid to soldiers in the Civil War, ASYMCA is our nation's oldest military-family focused charity. ASYMCA has worked closely with the US Department of Defense (DOD) to fulfill its mission, to enhance the lives of service members and their families in spirit, mind and body through programs which address the unique challenges of military life. 1 of only 3 charities with a relationship to operate on installations in collaboration with the DOD, today ASYMCA supports 75 installations, across 18 states and Puerto Rico, serving young military troops and families. ASYMCA provides youth development, healthy living and social responsibility programs/services like after school mentoring, camp, early learning, childcare, food aid, deployment support, travel aid and more. ASYMCA is improving program standardization and accessibility, so programs may be replicated from one geographic area to another in order to provide a continuity of service to our military families.

Financials

Armed Services YMCA of the USA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Armed Services YMCA of the USA

Board of directors
as of 3/14/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Tilelli

Cypress International

Term: 2018 - 2019

Michael Basla

CACI

Matthew Benedict

MARCOA Media

John Bird

USAA

Derek Blake

La Quinta Inns and Suites

Kate Boyce Reeder

KRBR Consulting, LLC

Bob Burke

Bob Burke Consulting, LLC

John Butler

Health Net Federal Services

Kevin Campbell

J. J. Cawelti

DFW Airport

Marty Chanik

Vincent De Sio

YMCA Retirement Fund

Sharon Dunbar

General Dynamics Mission Systems

Michael Grady

David Halverson

Cypress International

Kevin Isherwood

GEICO

Neil Jarvis

Fujitsu Defense and National Security

Scott Laverty

Western Stone and Metals Corp.

Joseph Militano

Leonardo DRS

David Page

Brown-Forman

Richard Pattenaude

Ashford University

Melvin Spiese

Matthew Stover

Pam Swan

Veterans United Home Loans

Mitchell Waldman

Huntington Ingalls Industries

Vernon Wallace

Raytheon

Andy Walsh

William Zemp

Southern New Hampshire University

Kathie Zortman

Ricardo Chamorro

PENFED

Lawrence Hughes

7-Eleven

Andrea Inserra

Booz Allen Hamilton

Jeremy Martin

Bell

Meg O'Grady

Purdue Global

Tim Paynter

Northrop Grumman

Lauren Stevens

Northrop Grumman

David Scanlan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable