Housing, Shelter

Habitat for Humanity of Omaha

aka Habitat for Humanity of Omaha   |   Omaha, NE   |  www.habitatomaha.org

Mission

Habitat for Humanity builds strength, stability, and self-reliance through shelter. Serving Douglas and Washington counties in Nebraska, Habitat Omaha works to eliminate substandard housing by providing low-to-moderate income families with opportunities to successfully achieve and maintain homeownership while improving the safety, appearance, and value of neighborhoods.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since 1984, Habitat for Humanity of Omaha has served more than 1,800 local families. In 2019, support from generous individuals, businesses, philanthropic foundations, and the faith community helped Habitat Omaha to empower more families and revitalize more neighborhoods: • 56 homes were built or renovated and sold to low-income families • 81 critical home repairs were performed • 82 weatherization (energy efficiency) projects were completed • 68 properties were improved by Rock the Block beautification • 37 blighted and dangerous structures were demolished • 82,000+ volunteer hours were served in support of the Habitat Omaha mission Donations of time, talent, and treasure have made and will continue to make our work possible. Thank you!

Ruling year info

1984

CEO

Mrs. Amanda Brewer

Main address

1701 N 24th St

Omaha, NE 68110 USA

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EIN

36-3283625

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Omaha Habitat for Humanity

1 - To build decent, affordable houses in partnership with low-income families. Since 1984, 448 houses have been built/renovated.
2 - To provide opportunities for community service through various volunteer programs, including partnerships with Workforce Development, General Assistance, and the Community Corrections Center of Omaha. The number of volunteers that have participated and benefited from our programs tops 12,000 annually.
3 - To operate a retail store selling new and used building materials (called a ReStore in Habitat parlance) to fulfill a three-fold purpose: to raise funds for Habitat's primary construction program, to make low-cost building materials available to the community, and to reuse saleable materials and thereby help preserve our environment.

Population(s) Served

Habitat Omaha’s Homeownership Program serves families whose income is 30% to 60% of median for the Omaha area. Many families who qualify live in unsafe, unsanitary or crowded rental units as the need for decent, affordable housing in the Omaha metropolitan area continues to grow. Each Partner Family is required to complete up to 350 hours of Sweat Equity before purchasing their home. Sweat Equity involves working on the construction site as well as attending educational sessions related to financial planning, budgeting, home maintenance and the creation of healthy neighborhoods. Habitat homeowners pay 100% of the appraised price of their home through a 20 - 30 year, no-interest Habitat loan. Since 1984, Habitat Omaha has constructed more than 484 homes in partnership with low-income families and over 12,000 annual volunteers. We will build or renovate up to 45 homes in 2016.

Population(s) Served

Habitat Omaha’s Home Repair program helps current homeowners, whose income is between 25% and 100% of median for the Omaha area, restore their houses and improve the fabric of their neighborhoods. Each Family Partner must hold a clear title to and be living in their property and demonstrate good financial standing. Home Repair Family Partners are required to repay their no-interest Habitat Omaha loan within 10 years. In addition to serving as the lender, Habitat Omaha collects bids and proof of insurance from contractors and oversees the project to ensure satisfactory completion of work. Since 2008, Habitat Omaha has completed 326 Home Repair projects. We will complete another 65 in 2016.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Launched in April 2011, Habitat Omaha’s Project Demolition addresses the critical need to remove blighted houses in our community. It is estimated that there are more than 3,000 properties listed as unsafe/unfit for living by the City of Omaha with another 800 on the demolition list. Most of these properties are concentrated east of 42nd Street. Despite increased efforts by the city to address this concern, fewer than 70 of these houses have been torn down each year. Habitat Omaha’s Project Demolition works with public and private partners to identify these properties (often times in close proximity to schools and other developments) and tear them down to make way for a new home or space to meet a need in the community. Removing these blighted structures helps to eliminate havens for crime and squatters, increases surrounding home values, improves community pride and makes future investment in the neighborhood more likely. Through December 2015, Habitat Omaha has torn down 155 blighted houses.

Population(s) Served

Our Neighborhood Revitalization program (NR) is a multi-faceted, block-by-block community development model that marries all Habitat Omaha's programs with data collection and coalition building for more significant neighborhood transformation. As building programs are implemented within a focus area, the NR team works to strengthen the neighborhood association, provide referrals to address other community needs and bring people together through special events and beautification projects. Focus areas include Deer Park in South Omaha and Kountze Park in North Omaha. More neighborhoods will be adopted into this successful program moving forward.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

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External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Habitat Omaha relies on the donation of time and talent from thousands of people annually to help construct homes; keeping them affordable for the low-income families that purchase them.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Habitat Omaha relies on the generosity of many to strive toward a community where everyone has a decent place to live.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each year, Habitat Omaha helps more families realize their dream of homeownership or complete critical home repairs than the previous year. Habitat Omaha strengthens families and neighborhoods.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Since 1984, Habitat for Humanity of Omaha has worked to eliminate substandard housing in Douglas and Washington Counties, with a focus on blighted areas of North and South Omaha. And as long as substandard housing exists, efforts will remain steadfast.<br/><br/>The need to address substandard housing in North and South Omaha is staggering. One hundred percent of the families served by Habitat for Humanity of Omaha are considered "very low income" by HUD guidelines. Specifically, ten percent of these families live below the poverty line which is higher than the national average (U.S. Census Bureau 2006). The community need is great; Omaha is ranked 3rd in the U.S. for African-Americans living in poverty and nearly 60% of children living in North Omaha live beneath the poverty line (1st in the U.S.). According to the Omaha Planning Department director, Omaha has critical shortage of decent, affordable housing and to make matters worse, the City of Omaha more than 2,800 houses on the City's unsafe, substandard list and more than 800 on the demolition list. The need to address these statistics is crucial.

Habitat Omaha changes lives and transforms neighborhoods by building new or renovating homes, completing critical roof and exterior repair projects on owner occupied houses and demolishing condemned houses. Together, Habitat Omaha's programs strive to provide low to moderate income families with opportunities to successfully achieve and maintain homeownership while improving the safety, appearance and values of neighborhoods. <br/><br/>Habitat Omaha serves families whose income is 30 to 60 percent of median for the Omaha area. Each Partner Family is required to complete up to 350 hours of sweat equity before purchasing their home. Sweat equity involves working on the construction site as well as attending a series of educational sessions related to financial planning, budgeting and home maintenance and repair. Every home owner pays 100% of the appraisal price of their home through a 20 - 30 year, affordable Habitat loan. Habitat's goal is to create successful homeowners who will improve their quality of life and transform neighborhoods. <br/><br/>2016 By The Numbers<br/><br/>0 Families Received Free Houses<br/>4 Global Village Trips (Bulgaria, Cambodia, Costa Rica and Portugal)<br/>42 Homes Completed (new and renovated)<br/>41 Blighted Homes Demolitions<br/>79 Faith Congregations Engaged<br/>91 Critical Home Repair and Rock the Block Projects Completed<br/>100+ Children Who Now Have Their Own Backyard<br/>200+ Families Impacted<br/>8,000+ Total Sweat Equity Hours Completed by Habitat Omaha Family Partners<br/>12,000+ Total Volunteer Shifts<br/>63,000+ Habitat ReStore Customers Served<br/>64,000+ Total Volunteer Hours<br/>$450,000+ Paid in Property Taxes by Habitat Omaha Homeowners

Habitat for Humanity provides a 'hand up, not a hand out' to families needing just a little help. Habitat Omaha is a trusted and highly effective leader in the community working to end substandard housing. With a strong foundation of constituents, including committed family partners, Advisory and Board of Directors members, individual, corporate and foundation donors, as well as the City of Omaha and many partnering agencies, Habitat Omaha is well positioned to continue making an impact in the community.<br/><br/>Growing from a volunteer driven organization in 1984 to employing 75 people today, Habitat Omaha has invested the resources necessary to continue growing and serving more. Because of Omaha's Habitat ReStore sales and homeowner mortgage payments, 100% of donor dollars are applied to program expenses. Nearly 90% of Habitat Omaha's budget is spent directly on programs and services.

The work of Habitat Omaha is very tangible. Success is measured by the number of houses built and renovated, the number of critical exterior roof and repair projects completed, the number of condemned houses demolished and the number of families served.

Since 1984, and with the help of more than 12,000+ annual volunteer opportunities, Habitat Omaha has served more than 1,400 local families and more than 450 worldwide through programs and services. Total valuation of Habitat Omaha homeowner properties is more than $24 million and Habitat Omaha homeowners contribute more than $450,000 in local property taxes annually.

Financials

Habitat for Humanity of Omaha
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Habitat for Humanity of Omaha

Board of directors
as of 7/14/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Drew Collier

Union Pacific (retired)

Buck Heim

Kutak Rock

Drew Collier

Connie Ryan

Streck, Inc.

George Achola

Burlington Capital

Rollie Johns

CSG International

Levi Scheppers

Nebraska Orthopaedic Hospital

Julie Fritz

Community Volunteer

Caren Woodruff

Cisco (retired)

Jeff Gordman

Jeff Gordman Advisory, LLC

Keith Jankuski

CHI Health

Marcos Hernandez

US Bank

Bob Dalrymple

Bank of the West

Javier Fernandez

OPPD

Dan Houghton

Buildertrend

Ryan Iwansky

D.A. Davidson & Companies

Laura Nelson

First National Bank

Angel Starks

Nebraska Realty

Brian Miles

Bridges Trust

Cynthia Grayson-Gooch

Metropolitan Community College

Teri Mercer

McCarthy Capital

Gustavo Oberto

Lindsay Corporation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

affordable housing, homeownership,Habitat,community development,no interest mortgage,faith group,habitat international,restore,home maintenance,environment