TreeHouse Inc

Ending Hopelessness Among Teens

aka TreeHouse   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  www.treehousehope.org

Mission

To end hopelessness among teens.

Ruling year info

1984

Principal Officer

Mr. Timothy Clark

Main address

5757 Wayzata Blvd

Minneapolis, MN 55416 USA

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Formerly known as

Family Hope Services dba TreeHouse

EIN

36-3287099

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

TreeHouse is on a mission to end hopelessness among teens. 31% of high school students report feeling sad or hopeless almost every day for two or more weeks in a row, causing them to stop doing some usual activities (CDC, 2018). TreeHouse serves 7th-12th grade students primarily in the Twin Cities metro and has locations in 6 other states. We address hopelessness in teens that is systemic or situational and it shows up in all demographics. Systemic hopelessness has roots in teens facing ongoing heartbreaking challenges such as poverty, abuse, neglect, absent parents and unstable home life. Situational hopelessness shows up when a teen experiences a romantic break up, disappointment or short-term struggle. Hopelessness doesn’t just affect the individual teen. It has a compounding impact, breaking down relationships, families, and communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Support Group

We create a safe space for teens to talk about what's really going on in their lives. These opportunities are either in person and virtual. Through Support Group, teens get to practice vulnerability and receive support from peers and adult leaders. Through our partners, we are serving teens in 11 states and growing.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

We gather a second time during the week to intentionally learn more about our God-given purpose. These times are designed to help teens develop the spiritual and personal life skills needed to grow into healthy young adults.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

When a teen joins TreeHouse, they have the opportunity to get connected with an adult mentor. Through this, teens get dedicated one-on-one time with a safe, caring adult who serves as a consistent presence and a voice of love in their life.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

We offer personalized coaching to help teens create an educational or vocational track for their future. This includes college application assistance, ACT/SAT prep, vocational discernment, and interview prep.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

TreeHouse provides opportunities for teens to have fun, learn about themselves, and connect with God in a deeper way. This includes sporting events, retreats, service projects, and social activities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

ECFA 1988

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals for every TreeHouse teen begin with establishing healthy internal beliefs and skills. Teens learn to form healthy relationships with peers and mentors, build coping skills to navigate obstacles in life, move toward a stronger relationship with a loving God, and discover personal value and purpose.

When these internal beliefs are established, teens display positive external behaviors and attitudes. Teens graduate high school, engage in an educational or career path after high school, decrease negative mental health symptoms, and develop hope for their future.

Teens aren’t the only ones who benefit! When these internal beliefs and skills and external expressions can be seen in a teen’s life, we believe it will make a significant contribution to the communities in which teens live –unleashing untold potential for all of us.

These goals are accomplished through participation in our multi-faceted program offerings and in the context of long-term, trusting relationships between a caring adult and a teen experiencing hopelessness.

Our balanced and rigorous programs meet the social, emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual needs of teens. TreeHouse provides a safe environment for teens to receive support, guidance, and practical skills in making better choices today to live as healthy adults tomorrow. We have high expectations for our teens, and we encourage academic effort and vocational pursuits to improve their lives and the greater community.

TreeHouse’s program and curriculum is based partly on Bonnie Benard’s resiliency model showing that teens thrive when given high expectations, caring relationships, and meaningful opportunities to contribute. Her research is based on a study of children born into extremely stressful situations where parents are mentally ill, addicted, abusive or who live in impoverished circumstances. She found that all human beings have an innate ability to have resilience, but there are key elements that when present will alter or reverse the potential negative outcomes of youth living in highly stressful environments, such as poverty. TreeHouse provides the key elements of caring relationships, high expectations, and meaningful opportunities to contribute.

TreeHouse also uses a best-practices approach modeled after Gisela Konopka's research and study of troubled adolescents to create the caring community teens need to combat the hopelessness they experience. Finally the Search Institute informs TreeHouse's work to build Developmental Assets in teens, empowering them to develop coping skills and greater resiliency, so they are able to overcome the negative effects of their systemic or situational hopelessness. Based in youth development, resiliency and prevention research, the Developmental Assets framework has proven to be effective and has become the most widely used approach to positive youth development in the United States. In fact, research shows that levels of Assets are better predictors of destructive behaviors than poverty, family structure or other demographic differences.

Our extensive history and experience, as well as our results, demonstrate that TreeHouse is effectively making a difference in the lives of youth in the Twin Cities. TreeHouse, in collaboration with Wilder Research, regularly evaluates the impact of our programs in teens’ lives. Together, we have found that our teens are making tangible strides relative to our goals for every teen:
• 73% believe they’re lovable, capable, and worthwhile
• 78% give support to their peers
• 69% stand up against negative peer pressure
• 80% have goals for their future

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We continually evaluate the needs of our teens and their progress toward the goals and truths we want for them. The responses help us identify our most effective approaches and to adjust less effective approaches. With Covid-19, we had completely adjusted over night to full virtual service. As social distancing has worn on, we have continued to learn from teen and staff feedback to adapt and connect in new ways.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Teens can be reluctant to complete surveys.,

Financials

TreeHouse Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

TreeHouse Inc

Board of directors
as of 6/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Dave Mortensen

President & Co-Founder, Self-Esteem Brands


Board co-chair

Lindsay Polyak

Cohen Taylor Executive Search Services

Joe Dunsmore

Digi International, Inc.

Roy Ferber

No Affiliation

Becky Lerdal-Huff

No Affiliation

Jim Kolar

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Jeff Carver

Real Resources, Minneapolis

Mark Lewis

InfoSource

Mark Thompson

No Affiliation

Jeffry Parell

National ReMarketing

Richard Stanek

Hennepin County

Wayne Swenson

AdvisorNet Financial

Julie Nelson

KARE 11

Lindsay Polyak

Executive Talent Solutions

Jan Gniffke

Bruce Locklear

Eagle Ridge Academy

Kari Palmer

Schuler Shoes

Tim Clark

TreeHouse, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data