CHICAGO YOUTH PROGRAMS INC

CYP Gives More

aka CYP   |   Chicago, IL   |  www.chicagoyouthprograms.org

Mission

Founded in 1984, Chicago Youth Programs (CYP) serves inner-city youth who do not have access to social services due to location, poverty, or availability. CYP strives to improve the health and life opportunities of at-risk youth through a comprehensive, long-term approach aimed at developing their capabilities. Recognizing that there are many obstacles to inner-city children's social, cognitive, emotional, and physical growth, CYP provides consistent programming in the areas of: Education, Mentoring, Recreation, Leadership Development, Preventative Health Care, College Prep, Scholarship Support and Career Assistance. All of their programs are free and CYP provides free transportation to and from programming to ensure access.

Notes from the nonprofit

https://chicagoyouthprograms.org/make-a-donation/

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Cinaiya Stubbs

Main address

5350 S. Prairie Ave.

Chicago, IL 60615 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

36-3635676

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CYP provides 25 comprehensive programs to at-risk youth, ages birth-25, living in the Washington Park, Near North/Cabrini Green, and Uptown/Rogers Park and Westside neighborhoods. Why these neighborhoods? CYP is dedicated to serving those least likely to have access to support. These neighborhoods have some of the highest rates of youth living in poverty out of all 77 of Chicago’s neighborhoods. In Washington Park, our largest community program, 86% of children below the age of 18 are growing up in poverty. The need and isolation poverty creates, combined with underfunded schools and a lack of affordable after school or summer programs, feed into a cycle of poverty that is difficult to escape. To combat this devastating reality, we make it our goal to empower each of our youth to escape poverty by attaining the skills and degree necessary to attain financial independence.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Programming

To effectively care for children, society must understand how poor health, educational underachievement, low self-esteem, inconsistent parenting and untreated behavioral problems can lead to poorly functioning adults who engage in gang violence, drugs, teen pregnancy, and other antisocial behaviors. CYP promotes the broad development of cognitive, behavioral, and social capabilities of youth born into high-risk environments using a multifaceted strategy that is comprehensive. Volunteers staff 30 programs from preschool through college. Programs provide one-on-one tutoring, mentoring, recreation, quality health care by volunteer physicians in donated space at Children's Memorial Hospital, preschool activities, arts & cultural programs, college and trade school preparation & placement, and scholarships. At each stage of a child's development, CYP offers a package of programs which adapt to their needs and interests. Recognizing the special needs of our population, all programs are free to youth and provide safe transportation when necessary. This, along with home visits, frequent phone calls, and attractive programming, has lead to a consistently high yearly rate of retention of youth in the program (94%) and long-term participation. CYP strives to operate programs that make real improvements in the long-term outcomes of at-risk youth in as efficient a manner as possible. All programs operate in donated space and are primarily staffed by over 650 volunteers, ensuring that we make maximum use of every program dollar. CYP tracks every program child in an extensive database. High yearly and long-term retention, an 85% rate of placement into higher education (many fold above community rates and 50% above state levels), teen birth rates less than one-third of city figures, and very low delinquency rates prove the program's effectiveness.

Population(s) Served

Chicago Youth Programs (CYP) provides two literacy programs for 3-6 yr olds:
1. Read To Me -- This program fosters the child's interest in written language while teaching age-appropriate literacy concepts. Read To Me pairs children with an adult volunteer, who trains the child on phonics and reads to them.
2. Parent Run Evening Preschool (PREP) --This program stresses the importance of parental involvement in their child's education. Trained by volunteer pediatricians, parenting and literacy experts, parents conduct small group phonics activities. Following the CYP-developed Path to Reading curriculum (also used by Read To Me), parents systematically and effectively teach their children to read, while gaining positive parenting skills and building their own self-esteem.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have access to healthcare

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

General Programming

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of high school graduates who are persisting in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

General Programming

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

95 out of 130 post secondary placements (73%) compared to the community at large which typically achieves only 33%

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

General Programming

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric reflects the number of youth in our long term program who report having an adult mentor, volunteer, or staff member they can trust. This is representative of over 90% of program youth.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Chicago Youth Programs (CYP) is to improve the health and life opportunities of at-risk youth using a comprehensive approach aimed at developing their capabilities.

We understand that in order to achieve the real, transformative change that is necessary to successfully climb out of poverty, there must be impact across the broad spectrum of a child's life, with the goal of sustaining their involvement. To that end, our multi-faceted approach is:

Comprehensive: CYP operates 25 regular programs for youth, providing free, quality healthcare by volunteer physicians, literacy, tutoring, mentoring, computer skill-building, higher education preparation, arts, culture, and recreation.

Accessible: All programs are free and provide free transportation, contributing to high retention rates and long-term participation.

Efficient: Our core programs are staffed primarily by volunteers with almost all programs operating in donated space.

Effective: Using a proprietary Student Retention and Tracking System, CYP tracks each child's short and long-term outcomes. As a result, we are able to provide timely and relevant intervention.

Staffing: CYP has a very experienced staff, several with graduate degrees in their fields, many of whom grew up in, or had family members grow up in, CYP programs. Our staff members are thus uniquely qualified to design effective programming for the challenges of youth growing up in poverty in their communities. We are also supported by over 600 volunteers drawn from colleges, universities, hospitals, and businesses.

Fiscal: A large part of CYP's fiscal stability is our extensive use of in-kind resources. By leveraging the use of a primarily volunteer staff and donated facilities, we are able to operate with maximum efficiency and ensure that program funds are used wisely.

Technological: Our programs are supported through a database that tracks the attendance and outcomes of each youth. We also use various channels of communication with families and volunteers (e.g. email, text, mail, phone calls, newsletters) to ensure efficient dissemination of important information and follow-up.

I. MEASURABLE OUTCOME OBJECTIVES
A. Retention Objectives: The first step in helping youth escape poverty and all of poverty’s
associated health
and social risks long term is to keep them in positive program activities long- term.
Program Wide Retention at least 93%. Result: CYP experienced very high rates of retention,
exceeding program goals. Ninety-eight percent of program youth returned from the year before. A
full 95% remained in the program and met high attendance standards.
Average Years of Program Participation Upon High School Graduation. Goal: At least 10 years.
Result: 6 years, with a range of 1 to 15 years. With the introduction of the youth from the Mayor’s Mentoring
Initiative (serving young men and women of color in grades 5-8) into CYP’s core program model, the
average years of participation was skewed down. These youth initially joined CYP as a part of
Chicago’s former mayor’s response to street violence in the city before transitioning into CYP’s comprehensive program.
While a hit to this particular measure, CYP is excited by their enrollment. Taking out these youth,
average years of involvement is 11 years.
Yearly Retention Grades 6-9 of at least 95% –is the ages they are first attracted to gangs and
other dubious activities, and historically the age group most at-risk for dropping out of Chicago
Youth Programs. Result: 97% of 6ᵗʰ through 9ᵗʰ grade teens returned to the program and a total of
90% returned meeting high attendance standards. Adding new programs and activities geared to this
population, providing more opportunities for engagement with one another, as well as increasing the
frequency and amount of time offered weekly resulted in increased participation and new enrollments.
B. Avoidance of At-Risk Behaviors:
Positive Outcome at Age 18 –at least 90% of youth will avoid all measurable delinquencies through
18 years old. Result: 100% of program youth who turned 18 during 2019-20 had a Positive Outcome at
Age 18, avoiding, among other things, school drop-out, criminal conviction, violence victimization
while participating in violence.
Teen Parenthood Rates: Goal–less than 1/3rd the last published city rates for ages 13 - 19. CYP
continues to encourage teen girls to avoid promiscuous behavior, empower them to resist
inappropriate and aggressive advances by teen boys and men, and pursue higher education.
Result- There have been no teen births for the past four consecutive years.
C. Education Objectives:
Tutoring Pre/Post Test Scores: Goal–at least 15% average improvement in testing of appropriate grade level
concepts that are consistent with Common Core standards. Result: The average improvement was well
above 15% in all grades, ranging from 20% to 40%.
Yearly passing Rates at least 95%: Achieved
High School Graduation Rate at least 92%. Result: 100% of high school seniors graduated June 2020.
College Placement Rates at least 92%: To date, 99% of 2020 high school graduates were placed into
higher ed.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

CHICAGO YOUTH PROGRAMS INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHICAGO YOUTH PROGRAMS INC

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mark Arshonsky

Ernst & Young

Term: 2020 - 2022

Mary Daly

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Tom Deem

The Gap, Inc.

Tom Fiske

Ernst & Young

Diamond McNulty

McNulty International

John Riley

Retired Educator

Scott Steward

Genius Lab

Aaron Cohen

GTCR

Andrew Davidson

MBRE

Raphael Dawson

Walton Street Capital

Joseph DiCara

Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Katie Fairbank

Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

Eric Hoffman

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Chirinjeev Kathuria

New Generation Power International

Kevin Kenning

K4 Advisory

Maureen Larson

Lettuce Entertain You

Jeffrey McIntosh

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Megher & Flom LLP

Sandra Sanguino

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Karen Sheehan

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/20/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/20/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.